Metal Cladding in South Africa – Overcoming the Scourge of Misinformation

In these unsettled times it is depressing to note the proliferation of misinformation being spread on social media particularly pertaining to practices within the metal cladding industry. There are many assertions made by companies and contractors claiming to comply with or following an omnipresent unidentified ‘code.’ In this context a building code is the American term for building regulations, a set of rules that set the minimum standards to be achieved when designing and/or constructing building works to ensure public health and safety. Such regulations are normally mandatory in terms of an act of parliament.

All building work in areas under the jurisdiction of a local authority including any addition, conversion, renovation, restoration, sub-division or alteration,  but excluding electrical are bound by the National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act (103 of 1977) more commonly referred to as the National Building Regulation. The regulations are divided into twenty three categories pertaining to the different aspects of building such as administration, design, public safety, walls, roof, etc. In essence they set the minimum requirements for all aspects of building work. Compliance with the regulations can be achieved by either rational design, rational assessment (both to be undertaken by a competent person, as defined in the Act, for the different disciplines), use of methods, systems or materials carrying Agrèment certification or compliance with the deemed to satisfy non-mandatory provisions of the SANS 10400 series of standards which describe a method of design or construction that is deemed to comply with a particular functional regulation, The parts of the 10400 series are matched to the categories of the National Building Regulations (NBR’s). Imbedded within the NBR’s and SANS 10400 series are a limited number of obligatory SANS standards. All other standards and codes of practice are voluntary.

Supplementary to the NBR’s local authorities impose mandatory By-laws and in some instances the Conditions of Title for a suburb impose restrictions, an example of which is the restriction on galvanised metal roofs in some residential and commercial suburbs.

In addition to the NBR’s the Standards Act (8 of 2008) provides for the establishment of the SABS as the topmost national institution for the development, maintenance and promotion of South African National Standards (SANS), Other important objectives are to promote quality (best practice) and standardisation in connection with commodities, products and services and to render conformity assessment and related services.

Another trick is to claim compliance with a particular standard (code), which to the unsuspecting would mean full compliance with every clause, and to then unashamedly comply with only a select few clauses and disregard the rest. There have been instances when enquiring as to which specific ‘code’ is being referred to a foreign code is quoted which may not meet all the requirements of the NBR’s.

So the next time you are the recipient of these claims of compliance establish which code and whether it is full or only partial compliance and most important of all does it comply with the NBR’s.

COVID19 Update from dti – 2 June 2020

Dear all

 

In view of the current depressed state of the economy, and the high level of importation by retailers, there is a need to ensure sustainability of local manufacturing capacity.  We would therefore like to identify products that your industries have capacity to readily produce for supply into the local retail market.

Please see the downloadable spreadsheet below as a start, however, if there is any information that we may have missed, kindly add on.

I would appreciate feedback by Thursday 11 June 2020. 

Regards

 

Nyakallo Dlambulo (Ms)

Director : Ferrous Metals

Industrial Competitiveness and Growth

 

 

The Department of Trade,Industry and Competition (the dtic)

CAMPUS

77 Meintjies Street

 Sunnyside PTA 0002

Direct line:   +27 (0) 12 394 5713

Email:           NDlambulo@thedti.gov.za

Website:       www.thedti.gov.za

Document download links:

The Protea Network: helping businesswomen blossom!

South Africa’s steel sector is forging an online business women’s network, the Protea Network, where women working in the predominantly male-dominated steel and other market sectors can connect, build relationships and support one another’s development.

The Protea Network was launched by specialist large steel equipment fabrication company Betterect’s Managing Director Nicolette Skjoldhammer in April this year, to provide women in industry with the opportunity to connect and mentor each other.

“I started the Network after I was challenged to establish it by my colleagues in the steel sector. These women are all dealing with similar career challenges individually, and were looking for a common source of collective connection and support,” Skjoldhammer says.

The Protea Network is also endorsed by the South African Institute of Steel Construction (SAISC), of which Skjoldhammer is currently the Chairperson.

“The Network will facilitate conversations among women who feel isolated in male-dominated industrial sectors and help them to build relationships with each other.

In this country, women tend not to have the ‘boys’ club’ bonding element of sport – which cuts across such potentially divisive factors as cultural or financial considerations – and brings men with similar sporting interests together. So businesswomen need a mechanism, such as the Network, for facilitating the same sort of bonding,” she remarks.

The Network will also give its members with an opportunity to provide and receive mentorship – which will lead to the advancement of women in the steel, industrial and other sectors,” Skjoldhammer advises.

She goes on to explain another reason that it is important for women to build connections with each other, is the perception that their skills are inferior to those of their male counterparts.

“This perception unfortunately really works against women, as it creates remuneration disparities and limits the career opportunities available to them. Furthermore, it sees them leaving the male-dominated sectors when they hit the so-called ‘glass ceiling’, shrinking the pool of talented women who could develop and progress. The Protea Network will therefore be a constructive movement, which assists talented women to grow and assume their rightful positions of leadership and authority within their respective sectors.”

Skjoldhammer adds that while some women may feel discouraged about their career prospects in the current economy – which has undoubtedly been very adversely impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic and national lockdown – there are always opportunities for growth, even in a shrinking economic environment.

“The key is to find the growth points in the economy and to connect with them – this is why the Network is so crucial and so beneficial. The steel sector was, for example, already under severe economic pressure before the Covid-19 crisis took hold: however, there are still several determined and innovative companies in this market which are turning the challenges into successes.”

Skjoldhammer also envisions that the Network will embolden women to ‘speak up and step up’ – and to increasingly make their mark across industry – although she also cautions against an overly self-centered approach.

“Sometimes, very sadly, women react to the feeling of being isolated or unsupported in business by regarding their female colleagues as threats, feeling that the only way to get ahead is to ‘stand on’ other women on their way up the corporate ladder. If they could rather join hands with other women, they will gain the confidence to express their opinions, show leadership and make their own distinctive contributions, in a far more constructive and mutually beneficial manner. This will go a long way to establish a more equitable balance throughout business,” she adds.

The Protea Network is therefore calling on all women in the steel and other industrial and business sectors to join, by signing up at www.proteanetwork.com. The Network is also actively looking for senior and knowledgeable women in industry and other business sectors to join and register as a ‘Protea’ – the forum’s designation for women with management or senior-level experience.

“Just as the famous saying goes that ‘no man is an island,’ no single woman has all the answers,” she quips. “Therefore, we encourage women at all levels to join the Network and add to the wealth of conversation and diversity within the forum.”

Skjoldhammer says that the objective of the Network for this year is initially to encourage and facilitate online forum membership, where members can engage on a daily basis. The next step in August will be to host a meaningful event, where women can further connect, engage and network.

“We envision that women will also frequently visit the online forum to interact with mentors and post questions on an ongoing basis. We want our members to regard the Network forum as a space in which they can enrich themselves and to grow in their careers and lives – and to encourage others to do so too,” she says.

“The long-term strategic intent of the Protea Network is to retain and develop women in industry, to grow the pool of opportunity and possibility for all South African businesswomen, and to nurture future female business talent,” Skjoldhammer concludes.

COVID19 Update from dti – 8 May 2020

Dear all

 

Kindly receive the below info for small and medium enterprises.

 

Kind regards

 

Nyakallo Dlambulo (Ms)

Director : Ferrous Metals

Industrial Competitiveness and Growth

 

 

The Department of Trade,Industry and Competition (the dtic)

CAMPUS

77 Meintjies Street

Sunnyside PTA 0002

 

Direct line:   +27 (0) 12 394 5713

Email:           NDlambulo@thedti.gov.za

Website:       www.thedti.gov.za

Document download links:

COVID19 Update from dti – 21 April 2020

Dear all

 

Please see the attached summary of  Covid-19 Funding Support , for ease of reference.

 

Regards

 

Nyakallo Dlambulo (Ms)

Director : Ferrous Metals

Industrial Competitiveness and Growth

 

The Department of Trade,Industry and Competition (the dtic)

CAMPUS

77 Meintjies Street

 Sunnyside PTA 0002

 

Direct line:   +27 (0) 12 394 5713

Email:           NDlambulo@thedti.gov.za

Website:       www.thedti.gov.za

Document download links:

COVID19 Update from dti – 9 April 2020

Dear All

 

Kindly note the following information which may be useful to you.

 

Regards

 

 

Nyakallo Dlambulo (Ms)

Director : Ferrous Metals

Industrial Competitiveness and Growth

 

 

The Department of Trade,Industry and Competition (the dtic)

CAMPUS

77 Meintjies Street

Sunnyside PTA 0002

 

Direct line:   +27 (0) 12 394 5713

Email:           NDlambulo@thedti.gov.za

Website:       www.thedti.gov.za

 

Document download links:

COVID19 Update from SARS – 30 March 2020

Dear Traders 

 

Please find attached for your information: Announcement by Minister of Finance on Tax measures to combat the COVID-19 pandemic  

 

This information has been also been published on: 

http://www.treasury.gov.za/comm_media/press/2020/20200329%20Media%20statement%20-%20COVID-19%20Tax%20Measures.pdf 

http://www.treasury.gov.za/comm_media/press/2020/20200329%20Explanatory%20Notes%20on%20COVID%2019%20Tax%20measures%20-%2029%20March%202020.pdf 

 

SARS social media platforms 

https://web.facebook.com/sarstax 

https://twitter.com/sarstax 

https://www.linkedin.com/company/sars/ 

 

Mineé Hendricks 

Executive: Private Sector Stakeholder Management (act) 

 

Tel +27 12 483 1729 

Cell  +27 82 453 3191   

Email:mhendricks@sars.gov.za 

271 Veale Street, Nieuw Muckleunek 

Landbank Building 

Document download links:

COVID19 Update from dti – 2 April 2020

Dear All

FYI

Please see the following link on the South African Government Support for business:

https://www.gov.za/Coronavirus/support-business

 

Kind regards

Nyakallo Dlambulo (Ms)

Director : Ferrous Metals

Industrial Competitiveness and Growth

 

The Department of Trade,Industry and Competition (the dtic)

CAMPUS

77 Meintjies Street

 Sunnyside PTA 0002

 

Direct line:   +27 (0) 12 394 5713

Email:           NDlambulo@thedti.gov.za

Website:       www.thedti.gov.za

COVID19 Update from dti – 27 March 2020

Dear All 

If you are providing essential service or goods, kindly provide us feedback on your experience on the following: 

  • issues with the police/ military 
  • any supplychain issues 
  • any positive or negative factor that may have affected operations 
  • issues with worker transportation etc 
  • any other issue  

I humbly request that you send us the feedback at 10h30 today, by replying to this email. Please indicate where your company is located as well. 

Kind regards 

Nyakallo Dlambulo (Ms) 

Director : Ferrous Metals 

Industrial Development Division 

 

The Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) 

CAMPUS 

77 Meintjies Street 

 Sunnyside PTA 0002 

Direct line:   +27 (0) 12 394 5713 

Email:           NDlambulo@thedti.gov.za 

Website:       www.thedti.gov.za