Gamsberg Zinc Project

The Gamsberg Zinc Project is significant in that it will exploit one of the largest known, undeveloped zinc orebodies in the world. It was discovered almost 40 years ago and held undeveloped in the asset portfolios of various mining companies and subsequently, it was acquired from Anglo American by the Vedanta group in 2011. The Project comprises of an open pit mine and a dedicated processing plant.

ELB Engineering Services (Pty) Ltd were appointed as the EPC contractor for the engineering, procurement, construction and commissioning of the 4mtpa Zinc Concentrator, associated infrastructure and bulk infrastructure scope including a 20km overland power line and 30km overland water line and treatment facilities. 

A critical feature of Gamsberg’s development is its approach to biodiversity. The Project is being developed in the ecologically sensitive Succulent Karoo Biome, a designated biodiversity “hotspot” and one of just 35 “biodiversity hotspots” in the world. This has required extensive engagement with key stakeholders – government, NGOs and landowners, – which has resulted in a unique biodiversity offset agreement.

At peak, more than 3,400 people were employed by Vedanta Zinc International and business partners being the peak of Gamsberg’s construction. Around 700 people are currently employed permanently at the Gamsberg mine. Recruitment of local community members – in the first instance from local communities such as Pella, Pofadder and Onseepkans, and then from Namakwa District and the rest of the Northern Cape – was an obligation for all of the business partners working on Gamsberg and a priority for Zinc International itself. Of the people already deployed on the project, more than half are from local communities and the Northern Cape.

What was the brief to the architect?

No architect was involved or engaged on the project specifically for the industrial and mining structures. However, Von Bruun Architects were contracted for the LSFB portions of the project which were specifically the laboratory, change house, canteen and administrative buildings. The brief to the architect was to design and develop a system which could be largely fabricated in works off site, transported to the project works and erected with a minimum of on-site work. Given the high cost of skilled labour and erection on site, there was a material advantage to fabricating as much as possible in workshops off site and to limiting on-site work to the erection of modular units.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Preference was given to the use of structural steel as a structural commodity in the process plant design due to the remoteness of the site and limited construction resources available in the vicinity of the site.

This added value thus resulted in high standards of quality and delivery due to the works being undertaken in the controlled environment of the fabricator’s workshop and also reduced the requirement for site based resources.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

As the steelwork structures on this project covered the full spectrum from light lattice and trussed frames for cable and pipe racking to structures supporting large dynamic loads and overhead traveling cranes, from modular overland conveyor sections to a cantilevered stockpile feed conveyor, the project required the use of a very broad range of hot and cold rolled standard sections as well as made up plate girders.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

Cladding was used extensively to the roofs of substations, conveyor gantry doghouses, roofs and walls of the filter press building, compressor house and the like. In general, the cladding was conventionally applied IBR-profile 0.58mm.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

Due to the remoteness of the Gamsberg site in the Northern Cape and the limited access to construction materials, a clear strategy was adopted to consider alternative solutions for the construction of all non-process related buildings on the project. Through adopting the LSFB solution of the Assay Laboratory, Administration, Canteen and Changehouse, the site based resource requirements were significantly reduced during the construction period thereby improving the safety of the overall construction activities at the site through minimising congestion and interface management.

The LSFB design philosophy also proved to be more flexible in terms of accommodating late changes brought about by the fast track nature of the project. The inherent prefabricated nature of the LSFB reduced the construction time frame associated with the structural frames and opened up parallel working fronts for the installation of the services accommodated in the wall panels.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about the fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The Engineer designed all of the steel structures which was then issued to the various fabricators who also undertook the detailing work prior to manufacture.

It was incumbent on the Engineer and team to check that the detailing had been undertaken to the relevant codes and practices so as to produce complete shop-detailed fabrication drawings.

Close liaison with the fabricators afforded the Engineer greater control over the quantity and measure of steelwork.

Interfacing the details into the Tekla models resulted in significant time savings to the project.  Conceptual designs in-house, allowed the Engineer to tailor the fabrication of steelwork to suit the erection on site with specific emphasis on minimising small-piece assembly.

The two primary measures of the success of this process are the minimal requirement for site modification of fabricated steelwork and virtually zero interface errors to civil work and mechanical plant, then this process results unequivocally in success.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

 The project gave great scope to structural designers to carry out innovative and creative work. At the dictate of a somewhat fluid project schedule, designs often had to be adapted to retrofitting or to constructability with restricted access or to speed of fabrication and erection. One particular case in point being the design, detailing and erection (often retrofitting to structures already completed) of pipe and cable racks (latticed and framed or box trussed) as these were to a great extent site-run services which crossed already completed works or vehicle access ways.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The project setup was unique in that it comprised four distinct centres of execution across the subcontinent, including China, India and South Africa. The centre of gravity moved progressively from Beijing, where the process and basic engineering design was undertaken, Johannesburg where the detailed engineering to South African norms and standards was completed and all procurement undertaken, and finally to the Northern Cape during the construction phase. The engagement and involvement of the Owner’s Engineering team based in India formed an integral communication link throughout the project execution phase. The greatest lesson learnt in terms of communication across continents is the necessity of early engagement and team building across the broader project stakeholders, to gain a better understanding of cultural differences and approaches to engineering solutions and establish a common base of mutual respect and understand early on.   

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork Final installation of structural steelwork – September 2018.
Completion date of full project Operational Completion – 6 December 2018.
Tons of structural steel used 2 177t.
Structural profiles used SA hot-rolled sections S355JR:  

·           RSA, RSC, PFC, UB, UC

·           Plate Girders

 

Cold-formed sections:

·             CRLC purlins & girts

 

Platework S355JR

·             Chutes, bins, hoppers

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding Approximately October 2018
Cladding profile/ type used 0,56 / 0,8 IBR Chromadek: Kingfisher Blue N01029
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 8 142 m²
LSFB /  LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work Final building completed in October 2018.
Completion date of full project Operational Completion – 6 December 2018.
Tons of LSF used Approx. 60 tons.
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) Longest span 12m span  

Varies between 18 to 22kg/m2

Profiles used Z200 galvansied 550MPa 0.8mm flat sheet rolled on Framemaster profiler roll-former.
Type of cladding ·           Lamnaboard from Rigifoam with Terraco render  

·           15mm fIrec.heck boards from Knaus.

·           Internal 3mm rhinolite and washable paint.

·           Internal walls 102mm cavity batt from Isover.

·           Roof – 80mm polyurethane by Dalucon on 30mm purlins 0.58mm 550MPa.

PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator ELB Engineering Services
Client/ Developer Vedanta Resources
Structural Engineer Consultauri
Engineer ELB Engineering Services
Quantity Surveyor CD Venter Land Surveyors
Project Manager ELB Engineering Services
Main Contractor ELB Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Louwill Lefa (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector ELB Construction
Cladding Manufacturer Arcelor Mittal South Africa
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Abraham Hansen
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Louwill Lefa (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Westlake Warehouse Erf 50

The warehouse structure consists of a 23000 m² warehouse structure with a two-storey office block a concrete roof slab and a warehouse mezzanine floor. The warehouse is clad in pre-cast concrete tilt-up wall panels and steel cladding. Internal columns are provided at 32 m centres with lattice girders spanning in between. The portal consists of trusses centred at 8 m centres, with end spans of 24 m and an internal span of 32 m. Concrete columns were cast to 13.5 m above the finished floor level with steel columns to the roof height. The warehouse floor was cast to FM2 surface regularity.

Externally 5m cantilever canopies were provided over the loading docks with an 11 m cantilever canopy required over the side loading bays. The total steel tonnage for the project was 485Tons.

The challenges faced on this project was the fast-tracked construction programs and working at heights with these tall warehouse structures. The fast-tracked construction program resulted in detailing done within 2 weeks by KRU Detailing to give SE Steel Fabrication the edge in the market.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork June 2018
 Completion date of full project 12 December 2018
Tons of structural steel used 485 Tons
Structural profiles used Member sizes :Columns=UB245*146*31 Truss top chord=100*100*8 Angle Truss bottom chord=90*90*8 Angle; Top & bottom chord of Girder=UB254*146*31; Roof bracing 70*70*6 & 80*80*8 Angle; Sag angle=45*45*3 Angle; Purlins=250*75*20*2.0 & 250*75*20*2.5 CFLC; Girts= 200*75*20*2.0 

CFLC; Vertical bracing=165*3.5 CHS; Louver Frames= 200*15*4.0 RHS & 150*150.4.0 SHS. Die langste span op die gebou is 252 meter die gebou self.

CLADDING
 Completion date of cladding October 2018

Ultimate Heliport

A new Heliport for Ultimate Heli has been developed next to the N1 highway opposite the Mall of Africa, in Waterfall. The major structural steel aspects of the Waterfall Heliport are the roof structures and gantry crane beams for the two helicopter hangars positioned in Portion 2 and Portion 4 of the heliport.

Portion 2

Roof Structure

The roof structure of the hangar at Portion 2 of the Heliport consists of trusses occurring every 6.65 m or 6.60 m apart and spanning distances ranging from 23.66 m to 28.31 m. The trusses support purlins, roof sheeting and insulation. A portion of the hangar roof in one area is raised to a higher level in order to provide enough clearance for an overhead traveling crane to operate beneath the roof and above the helicopters. This portion of the hangar is used for maintenance of the helicopters.

At the western side of Portion 2, next to the N1 highway, reinforced concrete columns occur at every 6.65 m or 6 m whereas on the eastern side of the hangar, four reinforced concrete columns are separated by distances of 19.8 m,19.95 m and 19.8 m respectively. The large openings between the columns on the eastern side of Portion 2 is to provide enough clearance for the helicopter rotors when these are towed in and out of the hangar. Due to the large opening over these hangar doors, three structural steel girders spanning nearly 20m each have been provided to support the trusses between the columns. These girders also support the heavy Techentrup roller shutter doors which roll up vertically and weigh 1.4 tons each. The vertical deflection of these girders is limited to 10mm to ensure the smooth operation of the roller shutter doors.

The roof structures for the hangars (Portion 2 and Portion 4) were analyzed using the Prokon frame analysis program with loading modelled in 9 different factored combinations. All the structural steel trusses and girders which form part of the roof structures are manufactured using circular hollow sections of varying sizes. The trusses consist of a horizontal bottom chord and a radiused top chord which follows the shape of the curved profile of the roof sheeting. The shape of the roof has been designed by the architects in the shape of an aero foil and the steel structure has been designed accordingly. The depth of the trusses at their deepest point is roughly 2.4 m. Vertical and diagonal chords connect the top and bottom chords spaced at 1.49 m along the length of the truss. The girder trusses comprise of horizontal top and bottom chords with vertical and diagonal chords connecting the two along its length.

Gantry Crane Beams

The gantry crane beams in the Portion 2 hangar under the raised section of the roof are designed to carry an overhead travelling crane with a capacity of 5 tons. This crane is necessary for the removal of heavy helicopter components such as engines and gearboxes. At the eastern side of the building the gantry crane beam spans 19.8 m and on the western side of the building the gantry crane beam is continuous and spans three lengths of 6.6 m each. The eastern gantry crane beam is made up of an 850 mm deep (16 mm thick) web plate and two 500 mm wide (20 mm thick) flange plates, with stiffener plates occurring every 825 mm along its length. The western gantry crane beam is made up of a 254 x 146 x 43 I-beam capped with a PFC200 x 75, with stiffener plates occurring every 510 mm along its length.

Portion 4

Roof Structure

The roof structure of the Portion 4 hangar is similar to that of Portion 2, except that the roof height remains constant along its length, at a similar height to the raised section of Portion 2. Trusses which support purlins, roof sheeting and insulation, occur at each gridline which are roughly 5.6 m apart and span 30 m.

At the western side of the hangar, reinforced concrete columns support each truss on a gridline, while at the eastern side (air side) of the hangar, four reinforced concrete columns are placed roughly 16.7 m apart. Due to these large spans between columns, three structural steel girders spanning nearly 16.7 m each have been provided to support the trusses between the columns.

As with Portion 2, large roller shutter doors which open vertically between each of the columns on the eastern side of the hangar provide enough clearance for the helicopter rotors when they are towed in and out of the hangar. However, since the roof is raised to allow for the operation of the overhead travelling crane beneath, the same girder trusses which support the roof trusses are not able to support the heavy roller shutter doors too. Therefore, an additional steel girder has been provided between each of the columns at a lower level to support the heavy Techentrup roller shutter doors which roll up vertically and weigh 1.3 tons each. The vertical deflection of these girders is limited to 10mm to ensure the smooth operation of the roller shutter doors.

Gantry Crane Beams

Similar to the Portion 2 hangar, Portion 4 was also designed to accommodate an overhead travelling crane with a capacity of 5 tons. The crane in Portion 4 however has been designed to reach the entire floor space and therefore gantry crane beams span across the interior of both the eastern and western perimeters of the hangar and are supported by the reinforced concrete columns. These cranes will in future be used for the removal of heavy helicopter components such as engines and gearboxes.

The gantry crane beam on the western side of the building spans roughly 5.6 m and is continuous along its length. Due to the small span between columns, this beam is made up of a 254 x 146 x 43 I beam capped with a PFC 200 x 75 and stiffener plates occurring every 510 mm along its length. On the eastern side (air side) of the hangar, the gantry crane beams have to span over the hangar door openings of 16.7m, and are made up of a 533 x 210 x 122 I- beam, capped with a PFC 300 x100 and stiffener plates occurring every 1000 mm.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork September 2018
Completion date of full project November 2018
Tons of structural steel used 130 Tons
Structural profiles used All Types of Profiles
SA content – if this is an export project All Types
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding November 2018
Cladding profile/ type used Kliptite 700 – 0.58mm thick Z200 C1S roof sheeting and side cladding
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Roof – 4454 m2 – 29397 kg
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator KRU Detailing
Client/ Developer Ultimate Heli
Architect Liquid Spaces
Structural Engineer Fortem
Engineer C-Plan
Quantity Surveyor CDL Quantity Surveyors
Main Contractor Liviero
Steelwork Contractor Central Welding Works
Steel Erector Central Welding Works
Cladding Manufacturer Pinnacle cladding
Cladding Supplier Pinnacle cladding
Cladding Contractor Pinnacle cladding
Corrosion Protection Paintwork Contractor Dram Trading
Roofing and Cladding Global Roofing Solutions
Nomination Document Submission KRU Detailing CC
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing CC

Louwlardia Pocket 3 Warehouse

The project features a two-story office block and a mezzanine office. The warehouse and offices were designed for dolomitic conditions with a post-tensioned surface bed (FM2 finish). The warehouse steel structure consists of two girder trusses with a 32m span that supports a total of 16 portal trusses spanning 32m on the sides & 24m internally. The average span for the purlins was 10.667m with one bay spanning 12m. Due to these large spans for the purlin a Metsec section was selected for the structural capabilities it gives compared to standard cold formed lipped sections.

The warehouse is roughly estimated at 16600 m² (excluding canopy area) with a total tonnage of 408t (canopy weighs 16t)

The steel structure was divided into four phases with the canopies as the fourth phase. The spring height for the warehouse is approximately 15,1m with reinforced concrete columns extending 13.5m above the surface bed to support the portals.

The challenges faced during the erection of the steel structure were mostly natural causes such as rain and wind that made working conditions difficult and thorough safety precautions were adhered to.

On the Main warehouse

 The large spans for the purlin whilst keeping the weight for the structure as low as possible, further the selection of available purlin sections (demand and supply) that can span the required distances was a challenge by itself.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork June 2018
 Completion date of full project 12 December 2018
Tons of structural steel used 408 Tons
Structural profiles used I-sections, Angles, Hollow sections, cold formed sections, metsec z & c sections, T- sections,

CLADDING
 Completion date of cladding October 2018
Cladding profile/ type used Horizontal = CRAFT-LOCK® 0.58MM G 300 S AZ 100 COLORPLUS RIBBED METAL SHEETING  

Vertical = IBR 0.53MM G 550 S AZ 100 COLORPLUS RIBBED SHEETING

LSFB / LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of full project Practical Completion = 12 December 2018
Tons of LSF used 7 Tons
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) No Truss, Beam Span Roughly 14.2m
 Profiles used I-Sections, Angles, Square Hollow Sections, Cold Formed Sections

JRL Brand Experience Centre – Lonehill

The top portion of the steel roof was designed to fall 3 ways in order to reduce the steel roofs height near the edges of the roof. Thus, preventing the steel structure sticking out over the 45-degree concrete sill beams looked at from ground level. This was done by means of trusses angle at 45 degrees to the primary truss as seen in the roof design. Trusses were set on a concrete nib that ran around the eaves in order to ease the fixing of the steel to the concrete frame.

Middle roof: This portion was less complicated than the top roof as the trusses all ran parallel to one another. An unconventional aspect was the fact that the adjacent cantilevered canopy was supported by this roof horizontal bracing, which was catered for in the design.

Warehouse roof: This roof was made up of a truss and girder system where trusses spanned approximately 14m and girders approximately 17m in order to correlate with the architect’s vision. Design was optimized by angling the trusses bottom chords and reducing depth where possible in order to save steel.

Canopy: The canopy is cantilevered off the side of the concrete frame thus eliminating steel stanchions and optimizing the space of the staging area.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 8 October 2018
 Completion date of full project 12 December 2018
Tons of structural steel used 32 Tons
Structural profiles used Beams; Trusses; horizontal bracing; Girders
Project Team Role Company
Nominator SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Client/ Developer SMH Group
Architect ICM Architectural Studio
Structural Engineer Themba Consulting Engineers Africa
Engineer Themba Consulting Engineers Africa
Quantity Surveyor Stuart Ray Skead
Project Manager Sacola Construction
Main Contractor Sacola Construction
Steelwork Contractor SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Steel Erector SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer Not provided by nominator
Cladding Supplier Not provided by nominator
Cladding Contractor Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection Paintwork Contractor Dram Trading
Nomination Document Submission KRU Detailing CC
Photographer, Photo competition Photography by Micaela

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Camp Jao

The completely rebuilt and revamped Jao Camp will retain the same high stilted main area built into the tree canopy, with more private areas in amongst the trees. The camp will comprise two villas and five twins with private plunge pools, lounge and dining areas, kitchen facilities plus en-suite bathrooms, including indoor and outdoor showers. The new Jao Villas, accommodating four people each in the two identical guest rooms, which share the main area, will feature a private vehicle, guide, chef and butler.

Why Steel was chosen

 “Over the years traditionally camps have been built using local hardwood and tinkers. This was not good as the forestation is a real issue. Certified plantation tinkers treated were the next step in the evolution of the Bush camp….. However, The CCX treated tinkers request a lot of maintenance and stress on the roads, service people, low of income dining maintenance and general frustration.

For this reason, we have worked to use pre-manufactured steel structures by SE Steel. This gives us a maintenance free structure that is manufactured off-site and assembled on our pristine site.”

“Having to replace our old substructures provided us with the opportunity to enhance the special features that we always loved about Jao, to make improvements and incorporate extra touches. We are making the most of our camp environment, with buildings set to blend into the tree canopy whilst offering stunning views and honouring our commitment to be as eco-sensitive as possible”, says co-owner of the Jao Reserve, Cathy Kays.

Lead architects, Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens, who designed the original Jao in 1999, shared their approach to the rebuild: “We have taken a fresh and contemporary approach to the sense of adventure Jao always had – creating a feeling of not knowing what to expect around the next corner, and the element of surprise and delight in this ever evolving sculptural architectural language. The architecture is a collection of different spaces that take the visitor on a spatial adventure as one enjoys being in the Delta The everchanging architectural structures take their clues from forms found in nature but in a fresh innovative way. Conventional materiality is replaced with a more eco- sensitive palette as the bouquet of spaces and sculptures evolves.

The way one is couched, protected from the environment, is blended into a series of highly sculptural emotive spaces that amplify the blur between the concept of shelter & art/ sculpture & architecture.

The visitor’s poetic mental space is taken to a higher level. The choreography of 24 hours in the Delta has been crystallised into structures that artistically house and heighten each event and ritual experienced when visiting Jao. A family of concepts have been evolved by the architects specifically for the Jao concept”.

The main area will feature both indoor and outdoor lounges, dining areas, a satellite kitchen and several private dining areas, along with a fire deck. The spa at Jao will be tucked in amongst the palms for privacy and is surrounded by water to provide a calming and tranquil atmosphere. The gym will be built on the edge of the island, presenting stunning views over the lush waterways, while the main pool, with its unique canopy pavilion providing shade, will project out into the floodplain with 270-degree views of the Delta.

A colour palette of creams, greens, soft purple and splashes of yellow will be used, incorporating a unique botanical theme with special emphasis placed on the water lily. A range of beautiful new furnishings will be crafted to reflect the theme. A mix of wood and light-coloured Eva-tech decking will contrast with the red balau wooden walkways and lighter floors in the internal areas. The walkways reflect the old camp and provide a striking difference to the room interiors, which will be more refined in appearance. Comfort is provided through cooling and heating systems, complementing the camp design. Using Climate Wizard, an Australian cooling system, the suites and villas will be cooled with an indirect evaporative cooler that delivers a large amount of cold air with no added moisture, for a fraction of the energy used by conventional air conditioning systems. Self-igniting Calore stoves will provide heating during the colder months.

Design choices amplify the eco-sensitivity of the structure. The steep angling back wall and roof are made with fibre roofing material, with the interior clad in fibre reed and the exterior clad in fibre palm tiles. The rest of the walls are constructed from a combination of canvas and gauze, with minimal glass in front of the bed and bath. Using aluminum frames, large parts of the front of the room will open up. The main structures are all made out of steel that is painted a gum pole colour. The roofs will also feature gum poles and latte poles to support the fibre roofing on the inside, with wooden plyboard to which the reed is attached. For maximum eco-efficiency, built walls will feature Cavitybatt insulation and an added board of plywood, with waterproofing and fibre palm attached to the top layer. We have made great use of natural lighting – parts of the roof feature sky lights covered with latte poles to provide shaded, dappled lighting. All buildings will have a latte verandah roof to provide extra shade.

A key feature is the museum and gallery, described by Rech and Carstens as follows:

“Imagine a building that houses all our thoughts pertaining to visiting the Okavango Delta This is how the concept of the Gallery and Museum was borne. This creates a centre where visiting scientists and researchers can present their research, and where items can be displayed for educational purposes. There are also always a large number of found objects that are interesting from a guest perspective as they give a greater understanding of the area such as local plants and animal bones, as well as geographical maps and artworks of the region. We are building a double volume structure that has the Gallery on the upper level- where these items can be displayed to greater effect, rather than just render them décor items and the Shop on the lower level. Among the Gallery items will be a series of prints from the National herbarium in Pretoria of Botanical pressing made by Cathy Kays great grandfather- E.E Galpin- who was one of the pre-eminent botanists of his time and has been called the ‘Prince of Collectors”. He left 16000 sheets to the herbarium and a number of plant species have been named after him. We are selecting plants of the region that he identified. Other items on display will be a series of animal skeletons, mounted and displayed like a museum, for educational purpose. The current plan is for a giraffe skeleton. Obviously, these are skeletons of animals that have died from natural attrition, so they take some time to source.” From waterways and lagoons to dry Kalahari grasslands, Jao’s location on a remote island in one of the most picturesque concessions in the Delta provides both land and water Okavango experiences, with day and night game drives all year round.

“We are delighted with the progress of the rebuild to date, and look forward to welcoming our guests back to our new and enhanced Jao Camp in 2019”, Cathy concludes.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork March 2019
Completion date of full project June 2019
Tons of structural steel used 330 Tons
Structural profiles used Tubes and I-Beams all cold rolled
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Client/ Developer Ngamiland Adventure Safaris (Pty) Ltd
Architect silvioRECH + lesleyCARSTENS Architecture and Interior Architecture
Structural Engineer PLB Engineers
Engineer PLB Engineers
Quantity Surveyor Q24U
Project Manager SE Steel Fabrication SE Steel Fabrication SE Steel Fabrication

QS4U

Main Contractor Lodge Builders Botswana
Steelwork Contractor SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Steel Erector SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer Fibre Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Auto Bavaria Waterfall Midrand

Auto Bavaria Midrand became the first black empowered Dealership in South Africa when it was purchased from BMW South Africa in 1998 by Andre Dreyer. Pamodzi Investment Holdings partnered with Andre Dreyer in 1999. In the twenty years of being one of the largest privately-owned Dealerships in South Africa, Auto Bavaria has gone from strength to strength; maintaining high levels of sales and service and consistently being one of the top Dealerships in the country.

The project features a showroom to one of the most desired brands in South Africa The Showroom steel structure consists of two girder trusses with a 59m and 57m span that supports a total of 10 portal trusses on the one side and 11 on the over side spanning 22.5m on the one sides & 17m on the other side internally. The average span for the purlins was 10.667m. Due to these large spans for the purlin and standard cold formed was selected for the structural capabilities. The showroom is roughly estimated at 4000 m² (including canopy area) with a total tonnage of 130t (canopy weighs 30- 60t)

Structural Steel Detailer interview:

The steel structure was divided into two phases with the canopies as the last phase. The spring height for the showroom is approximately 5m with reinforced concrete columns.

The challenges faced during the erection of the steel structure were mostly natural causes such as rain and wind that made working conditions difficult and thorough safety precautions were adhered to.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork March 2018
Completion date of full project July 2018
Tons of structural steel used 68 Tons
Structural profiles used Angles and CFLC and IPE’s Trusses – 60x60x4 and 60x60x6 Girders – IPEAA160  

Columns – Columns UC152x152x30

 

PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator KRU Detailing
Client/ Developer ABLAND (PTY) LTD
Architect Boogertman& Partners (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Kantley & Templer Consulting Engineers
Engineer Kantley & Templer Consulting Engineers
Quantity Surveyor Quanticost
Main Contractor Mike Buyskes Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Central Welding Works (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Central Welding Works
Cladding Manufacturer Pinnacle cladding
Cladding Supplier Pinnacle cladding
Cladding Contractor Pinnacle cladding
Corrosion Protection Paintwork Contractor Dram Trading
Nomination Document Submission KRU Detailing CC
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing CC

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

 

The Main Straight Office Park Building, Block C

The Boogertman + Partners building is a 2 storey structure, vs the 3 storey structures of the other 4 adjacent buildings. We wanted to maintain the same overall height per building for aesthetics and for as much volume as allowed, within an imposed height restriction. These restrictions guided us in the choice for a vaulted steel upper roof structure. The Apex is at exactly the maximum height allowed, to create a multi-volume production office space.

What was the brief to the architect?

The brief called for a division of spaces over 2 levels, for public (Meet /Make) and private (Work/Staff) space. Usable height was to be maximized, in effect creating space over 2 floors, usually used for 3 floors. A Higher floor to soffit height was also achieved. The upper ‘drawing office’ was to be enclosed in a light and airy enclosure, with maximum void space, and light penetration from a vast northern exposure.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The previously developed buildings, and other 2 buildings of the second phase where all concrete framed & roofed buildings. The one other building also reverted to a steel roof for programme reasons. The Boogertman + Partners building was planned and designed as a steel-roofed building, for quick construction, it’s ‘industrial warehouse’ aesthetic, and as a cost vs time consideration.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The large Steel portal frames, where designed as 456×190 H-sections, with cross bracing in 150 square hollow section tubes. The back of the portal frames rests on a concrete beam and the front ends extend down to ground floor level.

The space between portal frames is filled in with a framed glass curtain wall on both the north and south sides. The ridge is off-center, creating a mansard type aesthetic, similar to a warehouse type saw-tooth roof arrangement. On the south side, smoke ventilators are incorporated within the portal frame structure, in a vertical application. All AC & Electrical lighting services are exposed in the open double volume space. The bare steel was painted in corporate CI colours of Black and White with the B+P Orange as a highlight color. The external shading structure also needed to be integrated with the portal framing in a seamless fashion, using tubular steel sections.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The lightweight roof structure has quite a complex sandwich structure, to accommodate the external sheeting layer, intermediate insulation layers for sound, heat, air gap, and acoustic lower ceiling layer, all of which free-spans across the totally exposed steel portal frame. Long discussions with the acoustic consultant, Ivan Linn ensued to find the right balance between a lightweight, affordable roof, and the required sound attenuation & occupancy comfort levels.

Because all services were exposed, the fixing, suspension, and overall finish of lights and AC ducts had to be carefully planned. There was no ceiling void in which to hide any services.

GIve a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

The contractor’s programme was tight, and so also space on site for materials and maneuvering. A Spider crane was employed to lift and place pre-fabricated steel portal frame sections into place. Finishing of the steel and connections were carefully planned because all steel is exposed and visible, and welding had to be very neat.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about the fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The Structural Engineer, from Sutherland Engineers, worked closely with Iguana, the main contractor and Central Welding, the steel fabricators to comply with a very tight programme, shop drawing approval process and limited site access for erection of the steel framing. (more info from Sutherland/Iguana/Central welding)

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The steel portal framing and bracing is totally exposed and very much part of the overall aesthetic. Bright bold colour is used to dress & celebrate the steel structure. The steel portal frame is a strong & integral design element, framing the building, and identifying the double volume office space.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All parties, from the Architect, to the Engineers, the contractor and the fabricator worked hand in hand to overcome challenges. A lot of back & forth was needed to get everything just right. Any successful project has to rely on mutual respect, and individual contributions as well as a concerted team effort, all of which was prevalent in this project.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork April 2018
Completion date of full project June 2018
Tons of structural steel used 28.5 tons
Structural profiles used I Beams, SHS’s and CFLS’s
SA content – if this is an export project Yes done in SA
LSFB /  LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work April  2018
Completion date of full project June 2018
Tons of LSF used 4.38
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) None applicable
Profiles used Canopies and Screens 

 

Type of cladding KLIP-LOK 406’ PROFILE 0,58MM
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding May 2018
Cladding profile/ type used KLIP-LOK 406’ PROFILE 0,58MM
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 720m2
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Boogertman and Partners (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer RPP Developments
Architect B+P Architects
Structural Engineer Sutherland Engineers
Quantity Surveyor Pentad Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager CPD Project Management
Main Contractor Iguana Projects
Steelwork Contractor Central Welding Works
Steel Erector Central Welding Works
Cladding Manufacturer Brownbuild
Cladding Supplier Brownbuild
Cladding Contractor Steel Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Firstclass Projects

 

Durban Christian Centre – New Auditorium Campus

The “Jesus Dome” roof structure at the Durban Christian Centre was a well-known feature roof very visible on the sweep of the N2 coming into Durban. The auditorium burnt to the ground in a devastating fire in 2016 leaving the local congregation, some 3500 strong, without a place of worship. The rebuilt was commissioned in 2017 and the Team was gathered.

The Concepts

The Client wished to retain the memory of the original dome into the future, unfortunately, a shape which belies the modern understanding for acoustic performance. To produce a world-class auditorium the Architects, EPA, threw the memory of the dome up into the air and a tri-bifurcated arch was conceived. Simple, smooth extruded box shapes rising over a sheeted, duo-pitched and acoustically attenuated free-spanning roof structure. On plan confined onto a hexagonal concrete ring beam squeezed to focus on the stage.

There seemed little purpose, other than feature, for the arches if they were not to be used to hang the roof below. So two possible schemes were followed in parallel. One with no arches – the roof structure truss grillage made deep enough to free span, and a second with the arches used to hang the primary apex girder so economizing on the truss grillage. This gave cost comparisons to the Client in respect of the spend to achieve the arches over a more conventional structure.

Taking it to the Ground

Steel arches need pouncing points – for our structure, these were some 15m off the ground. Off shutter concrete prisms seemed to fulfill the need in every way. The primary arch buttresses needed to be slimmed to allow access on a restricted footprint so this arch was tied – the primary girder running under the primary arch forms the arch tie, interconnected in a bold move through large welded steel elbows set into the 2.5m wide reinforced concrete buttresses.

The secondary arch buttresses were free to sweep to ground along the steel arch thrust lines, or thereabouts.

For the balance of the roof structure, a chunky concrete ring beam sits atop 7m high concrete columns and tied into the double story structures at front and back of house.

Making the Geometry Work

The arches are, as a trio, wedged from a single sphere, with the origin deep below the floor slab. Each arch is the rind of a perfect slim slice through the origin of the sphere and as such, in radial section, is very slightly trapezoidal – this variation was so small that the shape could easily be rationalized to rectangular allowing the designers and fabricators to select UC sections radiussed about the major axis. The Hulabond cladding box adopted the final trapezoidal form. Round tubes were used for the lacing in combination with web plates.

With the concept realized and agreed with the Architect, the structural design team got to work developing a parametric algorithm in the visual programming environment of Dynamo, which works seamlessly with Revit. This was then used to solve the geometry of all of the arches by iterating through the parameters of the sphere, and the arch truss centerlines imported into the global OASYS analyses and REVIT models and ultimately into TEKLA.

Getting the Design Done

The internal truss grillage is a simple 6×6 grid, allowing the designers some latitude to offer up future-proofing for spot loads at the intersections, as well as providing a sensible patchwork for the arrangement of acoustic lining, services reticulation and suspended acoustic blades above the 3500 seated auditorium array.

Simple IPE purlins set up a bottom flange shelf frame for the acoustic lining and a platform for the Klip-Tite sheeting system. A clamped bracket was devised for all the in-roof services so that post erection drilling or screwing could be prohibited globally.

A series of global analysis models were set up, augmented by a suite of simpler two-dimensional model checks. The primary software used was the OASYS GSA Building Suite program allowing the import and export of geometry into and out of both Revit and Tekla.

Global buckling considerations paid attention to the arch arrangement, and overall stability, as well as serviceability for pre-cambers, and interim construction step models incorporating temporary support towers to protect the geometry during erection.

All the arches end with exactly the same “cheese wedge”, terminating on articulating pot bearings designed to resist pull-off (when the wind blows).

Getting to the Fabrication

Negotiating with a chosen fabricator, Impact Engineering was hotly debated at the outset. For such an iconic structure it is our view that this was a primary factor in the success of the project. Agreeing on fabrication methodology and understanding fabrication economies with the fabricators during the design development is a process most designers would wish for. We applaud our Clients and fellow Professionals for engaging in this way.

NJV decided from the outset to partner with a selected detailing house, Strutech 3D Modelling. The final negotiation TEKLA model became the fabrication model in a fluid process which eliminated in our estimate 4 to 6 weeks of critical path time.

Impact Engineering fabricated the arches as a whole, one in each of their fabrication sheds. Once complete they were carved up for blasting and painting. The arch crossover units were then preassembled for fit in the sheds before transport to site.

Innovating for Erection

Steffanuti Stocks have been exemplary in their attention to setting out of the large HD bolt sets ( note from Author: in 30 years of practicing as a structural engineer both here and abroad the use of survey and delivery of accuracy by both Steffanuti Stock and Impact Engineering was at a level of excellence I have not witnessed before).

Program necessitated that the arch pieces be pre-clad with the Hulabond panels almost entirely prior to lifting, this required coordination and care between Façade Solutions and Impact with only a small window of time after the fact to access the arches utilizing cherry pickers for snags and joint sealing.

An erection plan well considered reduced the temporary tower suite to two, one under each hanger intersection. To say that site access was tight would be an under-exaggeration, and every truss piece lift brought the site action to a halt and a gathering audience. Each piece was maneuvered into position, lifted and slipped into place – no double lifting, no cladding damaged and no site work required. After each lift pre-set survey points were checked and structural behavior deflections matched with expectations of the analytical OASYS models.

The eight tubular hangers lay green at the fabrication works until the primary girder was de-propped and then each was site measured and purpose made to fit. Once the arches were de-propped and the roof was hanging the trusses could be completed below the arch formation and the cladding installed.

The arches will be accessed for cleaning by rope access cleat methods devised under consultation, the cleats having been installed prior to the arch cladding.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork March 2019
Completion date of full project October 2019
Tons of structural steel used 280
Structural profiles used Hot rolled sections, nominal tubular
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding March 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite 700 0,53mm CIS
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 3300m2
Nominator NJV Consulting (Pty)Ltd
Client/ Developer Durban Christian Centre
Architect Elphick Proome Architects Incorporated
Structural Engineer NJV Consulting (Pty)Ltd
Quantity Surveyor Abakali
Quantity Surveyor (Lead) RLB Pentad Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager M3 Africa Consulting
Main Contractor Steffanuti Stocks Building KZN
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty)Ltd
Steel Erector CMGC Projects
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty)Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Phoenix Galvanising
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Top Coat
Fabrication detailing Strutech 3D Modelling
Corrosion Consultant          T.H.C.P.S.
Bearing Supplier Nova Engineering Works (Pty)Ltd
Access Consultant Façade Solutions
Arch Cladding Sub Contractor Scope Of Work

Razorbill Eco Construct – Shell Kroondal

Aecom was appointed by Shell to design, oversee and build the first green star rated Shell Ultra City in South Africa. Aecom saw the value of Light Weight Steel Frame building and appointed Razorbill who has 12 years’ experience in design, production, and construction of Light Weight Steel Frame. Razorbill’s design department transformed Aecom’s design into a lightweight steel frame structure. Shell /Aecom see the value of Light Weight Steel Frame constructionDeveloping the Light Weight Steel Frame steelwork designs to express the architect’s concept was a challenging exercise that would have been difficult to re-create in brickwork or in concrete whilst still meeting the parameters set out by the client.

The underlying drivers of the Shell Kroondal project on the N4 North West were cost, speed and environmentally friendly building methods which are especially apparent in the project promoting alternative building technology (ABT) and the role it could play in innovative development in South Africa. The project is notable for its lightweight steel structure featuring exposed lightweight steel trusses

Part of the requirement was to ensure that work opportunities were created for members of the local community and that there would be no impact due to the construction of the buildings on the adjoining wetland area.

The use of LWSF resulted in a significant reduction of transporting building materials as well as the use of materials that can be recycled at end of life.

World class Health, Safety, Environment and quality control measures were to have complied with that met the standards as required by Shell, Aecom and Pragma. In this Razorbill utilized a Health and Safety program that was tailor-made for the project and which was designed by an expert engineer with a vast experience in the mining, manufacturing and construction industry.

Razorbill utilised renders and finishing materials from Terraco which is proven worldwide and backed by a company with experience in all climate zones over the world. Extreme satisfaction was expressed by Shell International on the product and the speed of construction during their visits to the site during and after the construction of the buildings.

This is the future of building in South Africa and Africa, lightweight steel buildings have a much lower impact on the environment, rehabilitation of land is much cleaner and faster to achieve than with brick and mortar buildings.

LSFB /  LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work Aug 2018
Completion date of full project Oct 2018
Tons of LSF used 32.4 tons
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) 13 mtr unsupported / 26 mtr supported
Profiles used Framecad C-sections, 30mm and 20mm battens 

 

Type of cladding Exterior: 

. 12mm fibre cement boards

. Terraco exterior wall products

 

Interior:

. Gypsum 15mm firestop and moisture resistant boards

. Terraco interior wall products

 

 

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding Sep 2018
Cladding profile/ type used Exterior: 

. 12mm fibre cement boards

. Terraco exterior wall products

 

Interior:

. Gypsum 15mm firestop and moisture resistant boards

. Terraco interior wall products

 

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 3756m2, 36.379tons
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Razorbill
Client/ Developer Aecom
Architect Aecom
Structural Engineer Donnic Engineering
Engineer Razorbill
Project Manager Aecom
Main Contractor Aecom
Hot rolled Steelwork Contractor Marboe & Sons (Pty) Ltd
Hot-rolled Steel Erector Marboe & Sons (Pty) Ltd
LW Steel Contractor Razorbill
LW Steel Erector Razorbill
Cladding Manufacturer St Gobain/Marley/ Everite
Cladding Supplier Triangle Sourcing
Cladding Supplier Global Innovations
Cladding Supplier Terraco
Cladding Contractor Razorbill