Naspers Skybridge

The Naspers Skybridge is a pedestrian link between the CTICC 2 building and the Naspers building. The client tasked the architect with designing a new bridge between the new CTICC 2 building and the NASPERS building. This would aid in daily access for Media24 staff, as they did not have enough parking of their own and could then utilize some of the parking bays in the CTICC buildings. This new bridge had to link CTICC 2’s Second Floor with NASPER’s Fourth floor, roughly 13.5m above the road level.

The architects developed various concepts for the design of the bridge. Inspiration was taken from the shape of a tree, interpreted in different architectural expressions. Through workshops with the client (both CTICC and NASPERS) and the professional team, multiply small-scale physical models were built to convey the different design ideas, including an option of steel laser cut panels that form a sculptural support and leaf-pattern balustrade, and another version with steel support “branches”. Ultimately, the design was refined to form a simple yet “raw” aesthetic, with the architectural and structural logic informing the details. A composite wood decking floor in a staggered pattern was used to enhance the “raw” aesthetic, with Rheinzink roof sheeting chosen for aesthetic and practical reasons due to the slanted and curved roof. Panoramic views of the city can be experienced through the full-height glass façades.

Due to the location of the entrances to the buildings, the bridge curves for about half of its length. This creates an interesting architectural experience as one crosses the bridge, while making it possible to see the bridge’s exterior from the inside. Structurally the challenge was to support the curved section only on two columns, with the end part at the CTICC not being able to be supported by the existing building (thus creating a large cantilever that had to have minimal movement at the façade entry point).

The bridge was always envisaged as being constructed out of steelwork – to allow maximum views to the sides and to enable construction with minimal disruption to the street below. The bridge structure comprised mainly Universal Beam and Column sections, with some angles added to support the flooring and a CHS safety rail for window cleaning.

Engineer Interview

Challenges arose due to the weight of sections, which made moving these sections a challenge during both fabrication and erection. The bridge sections were assembled into just two pieces adjacent to the road, allowing these two large pieces to be erected using a 440t crane during a road closure on a Sunday. The two parts had never been spliced together before erection, with all dimensions being theoretical. The first real fit was therefore on site, and everything fitted perfectly.

Another challenge was erecting the bridge on a windy and rainy day, forcing the contractor to wait for a lull before lifting.

Since the bridge was modelled in 3D, an IFC export was provided to the contractor to aid them in the shop drawing process. In turn, they provided their fabrication model in 3D for approval by the engineer and architect, which ensured that the aesthetic intentions of the professional team could be met.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork October 2018
Completion date of full project March 2019
Tons of structural steel used  
Structural profiles used UB, UC and CHS sections
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding No cladding
Cladding profile/ type used Rheinzink
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 165m2
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Anchor Steel Projects
Client/ Developer Cape Town International Convention Centre
Architect Osmond Lange Architects + Planners
Structural Engineer Sutherland
Quantity Surveyor Turner & Townsend
Project Manager Lukhozi Engineers
Main Contractor Superway Construction
Steelwork Contractor Anchor Steel Projects
Steel Erector Anchor Steel Projects
Cladding Supplier Two Oceans Metal
Cladding Contractor Naturally Slate

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CTICC Skybridge

The CTICC Skybridge was intended as an above-ground link between CTICC 1 on the West of Heerengracht Street and CTICC 2 on the East. The client asked the Architects to design an enclosed pedestrian skybridge to connect the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC 1) with the CTICC East Expansion (CTICC 2) across the busy Heerengracht Street. Development of the CTICC skybridge was considered critical in enabling the two buildings to function as a single integrated international events hosting venue and providing a seamless visitor’s experience.


The curved skybridge with its slender slanted steel columns has an unusually dynamic aesthetic from outside. The curved route inside provides a dynamic visual experience as one moves across the bridge in anticipation of an obscured end destination. The indirect travelling direction guides the visitor’s gaze outwards and across the historic Heerengracht Street and allows the bridge to become a unique destination in its own right. This purposefully iconic structure pays tribute to CTICC’s core purpose of ‘connecting people’.

The bridge was always envisaged as being constructed out of steelwork – to allow maximum views to the sides and to enable construction with minimal disruption to the street below. Universal Beam and Column sections were chosen to frame the concrete floor and roof, which were both cast in sections in between these steel members, with support provided by Bondek sheeting. Universal Column sections were also chosen for the Vertical members, in order to frame the glass panels.

Circular hollow sections, however, were chosen for the diagonal members to minimise the disruption of the view. The same members were also used for horizontal bracing at the roof and floor level, to keep the section sizes down. Large circular hollow sections were also used for the slanting support columns.

Engineer interview:

Challenges arose due to the weight of sections, which made moving these sections a challenge during both fabrication and erection. The bridge sections were assembled into

just two pieces adjacent to the road, allowing these two large pieces to be erected using a 440t crane during a road closure on a Sunday. The two parts had never been spliced together before erection, with all dimensions being theoretical. The first real fit was therefore on site, and everything fitted perfectly.

Another challenge was the temporary support of the bridge during erection. This was overcome by introducing the temporary towers, which made the installation much simpler and safer.

Since the bridge was modelled in 3D, an IFC export was provided to the contractor to aid them in the shop drawing process. In turn, they provided their fabrication model in 3D for approval by the engineer and architect, which ensured that the aesthetic intentions of the professional team could be met.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork September 2018
Completion date of full project November 2018
Structural profiles used UB, UC and CHS sections
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Anchor Steel Projects
Client/ Developer Cape Town International Convention Centre
Architect Convention Architects – a JV between Makeka Design Lab cc, SVA International (Pty) Ltd and van der Merwe Miszewski Architects (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Sutherland
Quantity Surveyor Turner & Townsend
Project Manager Lukhozi Engineers
Main Contractor Superway Construction
Steelwork Contractor Anchor Steel Projects
Steel Erector Anchor Steel Projects

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CCBSA Mezzanine Office

The purpose of the project was to extend the existing storage facilities at Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, CCBSA,  Pretoria west plant. This included a mezzanine office building to be used as a delivery office for the warehouse. The building had to span 21m and be high enough to allow forklifts to pass underneath. In addition, the building was to be constructed in the existing warehouse and whilst the warehouse remained operational.

The brief to the architect

The brief from the client was that forklifts had to be able to drive underneath the office building. This resulted in a truss configuration that spanned 11m and had a clearance of 4.8m

The architectural concept was largely driven by function. The architect had a number of constraints to work with: (i) A building that spans 21m would have to be a truss type structure, and (ii) the truss had to have  transverse elements that works in tension. These members were likely to be large UB sections.

The idea from the get go was to provide an aesthetically pleasing structure with lots of coke red in.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

A brick structure with a steel truss roof was considered but due to the large spans and limited time available for construction, it was clear that a steel truss would be the most effective solution.  The steel truss was manufactured in the contractor’s workshop and merely assembled on site. This allowed for minimal disruption to the warehouse that remained in use throughout the duration of the project.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The 21m spanning truss is made up of I beams. I beams were used due to good stiffness to weight and therefore cost ratio. The fact that I beams are regularly available also added to this choice.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

Roof cladding was added to protect the gypsum ceiling in the event that the existing roof leaks. The side panels were cladded with soft boards where possible and with glass framed in aluminium where required.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The structure was assembled under an existing canopy making carnage very difficult. Note that the warehouse remained operational thought the duration of the project. As far as possible, parts were assembled and manufactured off site. Small sections of the warehouse was barricaded off to allow for the construction work. In addition, the contractor had to avoid forklifts that continued to load and off load coke trucks in the warehouse.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding   in this project?

The inclined I beams in the truss were cleverly cladded with aluminium framed glass.  Clearance for deflection was allowed for to avoid cracking of glass. The clear glass and red board cladding resulted in an aesthetically pleasing structure.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The project team consisted of a WSP project manager Tumelo Makubo, Architect Riette Postma from Flaneur Architects and Structural lead Johnnie Strydom from WSP.  WSP and Flaneur Architects works closely with the CCBSA Factory manager, Alan Clark.  Alan provided clear directives of what was required from CCBSA’s side and since WSP, and Flaneur have deliver a number of successful projects in the past, some of which was for CCBSA, the working relationship was professional and vibrant.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork26 September 2018
 Completion date of full project26 November 2018
Tons of structural steel used17 tons
Structural profiles usedUB Sections
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator WSP
Client/ Developer CCBSA
Architect Flaneur Architects
Structural Engineer WSP
Quantity Surveyor JS & Associates Quantity Surveyors CC
Project Manager WSP
Main Contractor WNR Construction Group
Steelwork Contractor RSB Contracts
Steel Erector RSB Contracts
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
RSB Contracts
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
RSB Contracts

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

No.1 Silo Bridge

The requirement for a pedestrian bridge link between two office buildings was borne out of the need of Allan Gray’s expanding workforce as they out-grow their head office capacity at No.1 Silo building in the V&A Waterfront. Allan Gray and the V&A Waterfront together with the architect and engineers developed the idea of a linking bridge between the No.1 Silo building and the adjacent Clock Tower building to allow the internal flow of employees between the buildings.

Not far away from the site of the bridge is the defunct Collier Jetty that has a steel gantry structure along its length, historically used to convey coal and later grain. The gantry is constructed from conventional bolted angle trusses – the inspiration behind the truss form of the bridge with matching diagonal angle sections. 

The brief was thus to design and construct a bridge that would allow people movement over the 12,5m span. While it is a relatively short distance the challenge lay in designing a structure that would deal with the movement between the two buildings that are built on separate floor plates by catering for differential lateral and horizontal movements of up to 20mm.


Architect interview:

The Allan Gray building has a fully glazed double-skin façade supported off long cantilever fins which are sensitive to additional loads. The bridge, therefore, had to be fixed on one side only, and cantilever without physically touching the glazed façade. As such columns were introduced to support the bridge at the glazed façade allowing unimpeded movement against it. The two columns, 219mm CHS, are braced by 254x146mm universal beams forming a ‘portal frame’ on which the bridge rests and on the other side, it is bolted to the reinforced concrete frame of the Clock Tower building by way of a shear key detail.

Engineer Interview:

To maintain the view corridor between the two buildings, toward the working harbour, the architects motivated for a crossing at second-floor level. Limited space between the buildings, the delicate glazed façade and the limited crane load that could be applied on the podium level between the buildings meant the structure could not be erected in its entirety and craned into position – it needed to an on-site assembly, erected on a scaffold deck.

A rectangular girder comprising 200x100mm RHS sections was designed as the most efficient steel structure to span from the Clock Tower building to the ‘portal frame’ and cantilever a further 1,7m to the Allan Gray floor plate. A spliced connection along the length of the top and bottom chords created parts that could be handled on site. Rigidity is provided by expressed diagonal bracing visible externally as a structural ‘exo-skeleton’, painted red. 

The design team devised connection details between the various parts that expressed the junction of the steel members, in keeping with the industrial, maritime aesthetic. 100x100mm equal angles bolted to gusset plates brace the vertical SHS posts on  the sides of the bridge. 100x100mm SHS brace the underside and the roof level, expressed externally on the soffit and internally below the ceiling finish. Spigot connector splice details were required on the bracing diagonals to cater for the erection sequence.

Where the bridge passes through the double skin façade a flexible EPDM membrane allows for the required movement but also a weather seal. The membrane is protected by overlapping aluminium flashings.

The bridge links offices on two different floor levels – this is achieved by a sloping timber floor within the girder structure. Steel cleats on stub columns welded to beams along the length of the bridge support timber joists at varying heights.

Main Contractor Interview: 

Sidewall cladding is Snap Lock profile in Armour Grey colour, selected for its broad pan and narrow flutes with wide rib spacing. Set behind the diagonal bracing, the industrial aspect of vertical sheet cladding further ties the bridge to its maritime setting. Snap Lock is also used for the roof sheeting and in conjunction with a stepped aluminium flashing detail it creates a crisp silhouette of the bridge spanning between the two buildings. 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 05 / 09 / 2018
Completion date of full project 14 / 12 / 2018
Tons of structural steel used 8.1 tons
Structural profiles used RHS, SHS, CFLC, CHS

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding 10 / 10 / 2018
Cladding profile/ type used SnapLock
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 48m²

PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Loudon Perry Anderson Architects
Client/ Developer V&A Waterfront Holdings (Pty) Ltd
Architect Loudon Perry Anderson Architects
Structural Engineer Sutherland Engineers
Facade Engineer Arup Engineers
Services Engineer Solution Station
HVAC Engineer Arup Engineers
Quantity Surveyor MLC Group
Project Manager Principle Agent  Architect
Main Contractor R+N Master Builders (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Prokon Services (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Prokon Services (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer Bluescope Steel
Cladding Supplier Youngman Roofing
Cladding Contractor Metro Roofing 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

KTM Raceworx

Multi-story steel-framed buildings used in conjunction with cellular beams offer flexibility and adaptability for the steel structure. Steel is a common feature throughout the structure provided a faster reaction time than a concrete option.

Hollow precast units were used on the flooring system. These were easily installed and provided for a working platform throughout the construction process. This was helpful in speeding erection time as fewer beams are needed as opposed to the conventional metal decking applications.

Due to the long floor spans cellular beams aided as an economical solution for the structural stability of the floors. If normal beams were used for the flooring system instead of cellular beams, heavier section sizes would’ve been utilized with possible plate girders in some instances. This would’ve been a much costlier steel option thus the economic benefit of cellular beams was shown.


What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

Flagship showroom for KTM & Husqvarna, other retail showrooms & restaurant areas.

What was the brief to the architect?

Motorbike showrooms, workshops and restaurant areas

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes, upon recommendation of the structural engineer.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

Various cellular beams, H-profiles, I-profiles and hollow sections due to excessive floor spans.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Setting out of column foundations for different floor levels was complicated due to basement excavation and extreme weather conditions.  Erection process occurred in three stages.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding  in this project?

By incorporating cellular beams as main mezzanine floor bearers in the  structural design for aesthetic purposes and using the apertures for the H-vacand electrical systems.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)
Excellent co-operation.  Every challenge was resolved with professionalism and open communication.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork October 2018
Completion date of full project March 2019
Tons of structural steel used 116 Tons
Structural profiles used 305x102x28Kg/m , 305x165x45Kg/m 

203x203x52Kg/m , 503x171x45Kg/m Cell Beam ,

576x178x54Kg/m Cell Beam , 648x191x82Kg/m

Cell Beam , 760x210x82Kg/m Cell Beam

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding November 2018
Cladding profile/ type used 0.6 Chromadek Material .686 I.B.R. Profile, 

Fabricated Chromadek Insulated Panels

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 2500m/2
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Macsteel
Client/ Developer Multiplant
Structural Engineer JandC Structural and Civil Design
Main Contractor JandC Structural and Civil Design
Steelwork Contractor Riggers & Erectors
Steel Erector Riggers & Erectors
Cladding Manufacturer Arcelor Mittal South Africa
Cladding Profiler Clotan Building Systems
Cladding Supplier Clotan Building Systems
Cladding Contractor Clotan Building Systems

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Structural Steel Roof Over Blue Downs Swimming Pool

The Blue Downs swimming pool was developed in response to the City of Cape Town’s wish to provide a high-quality indoor public swimming pool to serve the Blue Downs community. It is intended that the pool should serve as both a general community facility as well a sporting facility for use during swimming competitions.

The design of the structural steel roof comprises a main roof over the swimming pool area, as well as adjacent subsidiary roofs over two separate public seating areas, an administration block and a lifeguard tower. The requirements of the architectural design were furthermore that the main roof should be supported only at the four corners, standing 35 metres apart on circular concrete water storage ‘silos’ (the silos are for storing rainwater run-off from the roof for use in the pool). Due to the architectural requirements and the large spans involved, it was considered that no other structural medium other than structural steel would be feasible.

The original architectural design called for a rounded double barrel-vault roof over the main swimming pool area, in accordance with which a thin shell-type roof structure was designed. Due to financial constraints and difficulty in engaging suit-able local steel fabricators prepared to carry out the work, which required extensive use of curved members, the design was subsequently revised during construction to the current pyramid shape. In carrying out the re-design, the new design was constrained to an extent by the configuration of the supporting reinforced concrete structure already constructed.
Because of the highly corrosive swimming pool environment, a duplex system of corrosion protection consisting of both hot-dip galvanising and painting was adopted. As the components of the toblerone trusses were too large for the galvanising bed, zinc metal spraying was used for these elements in lieu of hot dip galvanising. Inspection and testing of the zinc spray application was carried out by the Hot Dip Galvanizers Association in order to ensure compliance with the speci-fications.

The main roof as per the revised design and as constructed comprises the follow-ing main structural elements: Pitched ‘toblerone’-type trusses forming the four corners of the pyramid shape, edge girders, and sloping secondary trusses.
The toblerone trusses are the primary structural elements, spanning diagonally across the pool between the supporting silos, and intersecting at the roof apex. The trusses work in combined bending and axial loading and rely on the lateral resist-ance provided by the four support points. The trusses support the ends of the purlins, the ends of the secondary trusses, and the translucent sheeting forming the facetted corners of the roof. Because of the potential for buckling in the slender axially-loaded trusses, diagonal bracing was provided in the plane of the roof to provide lateral stability.

The edge girders are placed along the perimeter of the main roof. Besides support-ing the side cladding and the outer sections of the roof, the edge girders assist in resisting the lateral support reactions from the sloping toblerone trusses. The edge girders on two sides of the structure also support the top edges of the subsidiary roofs over the seating areas.
The secondary trusses support the roof purlins, and are in turn supported at their top ends by the toblerone trusses and at their lower ends by the edge girders. In addition to supporting the roof loads, the secondary trusses are also used to provide lateral support to the chords of the edge girders.
The architectural requirements were for the structural steelwork to be exposed and to make use as far as possible of circular tubular members in order to be aestheti-cally pleasing. All main structural elements with the exception of purlins and sheeting rails, and including all knee braces and diagonal bracing, have therefore been fabricated using circular hollow sections. With the numerous intersecting members, welded connections between intersecting tubular members were in some cases rather complex, requiring careful fabrication.

A number of technical challenges had to be overcome in both the design and the erection of the roof structure. Due to the large span of the main roof, vertical midspan deflections of almost 60mm could be expected in the four edge girders. The interface between the main roof and the side roofs therefore had to be designed to accommodate this relative movement. In the case of the roofs over the administration building and lifeguard tower, this was accomplished by separating the side roofs from the main roof, and accommodating the movement by provision of sliding flashing joints in the cladding.
The erection sequence was established in consultations between the engineer and the steel fabricator, taking cognisance of the requirements of the design. The edge girders and toblerone trusses intersect at common corner elements, and these elements had to be installed at the beginning of the erection process. 

The corner elements had to be accurately placed in order to ensure proper fitting of the various trusses and girders. Because the toblerone trusses rely on the edge girders to withstand the lateral support reactions, the four edge girders had to be erected beforehand. This meant that the toblerone trusses had to be installed while working over the edge girders. One of the toblerone trusses was installed, remaining temporarily propped until the intersecting truss could be installed to provide stability.

Once these main members were in place, the secondary trusses and other structural elements such as bracing members and purlins could be installed. Because the design allows little tolerance for dimensional discrepancies, a high level of input was required by the steel fabricator in order to achieve the required accuracies.

Project Team

Developer/ Owner: City of Cape Town
Architect: ARG Design
Structural Engineer: Bergstan South Africa
Quantity Surveyor: LWA Quantity Surveyors

(R/A Waterson & Hoosai cc)

Project Manager: ARG Design
Main Contractor: Tempani Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor: Mazor Steel (Pty) Ltd

 

Makro Riversands

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The structure serves as a retail centre.

What was the brief to the architect?

To maximize space utilization and minimize construction time.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The main roof structure consists of girders and castellated rafters. Castellated beams were used for aesthetics and to reduce the overall weight of the sections along the span. Also to increase the spanning capabilities.CHS were used in the barrel vaults as an architectural feature.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The fabrication of the barrel vault needed to be completed to a tight tolerance in order to ensure correct fitment of barrel vault sky –lights.

It was complex due to the fast-track nature of the project. Whereby close coordination was required between the civil contractor, steel contractor, building contractor, sheeting contractor, fire services, mechanical services in order for the works to be completed in the required sequence within the building footprint.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The structural steel barrel vault arches on Makro structures have become a nationwide symbol of the Makro brand.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

MPW detailing office worked in close communication with the engineering and architecture team in order to ensure discrepancies were picked up within the detailing phase, to allow for adjustments to be made prior to fabrication. This resulted in a structural system which very closely resembled a Mecano set. Therefore it allowed us to reduce erection time on site. All contractors on site worked in close unison moving from section to section ensuring all the requirements were met timeously.

Tons of structural steel used 480 TONS
Structural profiles used CASTELLATED, TUBING, UC, UB

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator MPW Steel Construction
Client/ Developer Makro / Century Properties
Architect R&L Architects
Structural Engineer L&S Consulting
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager MPW Steel Construction
Main Contractor Concor
Steelwork Contractor MPW Steel Construction
Steel Erector MPW Steel Construction
Cladding Manufacturer Grs
Cladding Supplier Grs
Cladding Contractor Roofing Guarantee 
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition MPW Steel Construction
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Whalecoast Mall

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

Regional Retail Centre

What was the brief to the architect?

Provide a First Class Retail Centre, providing a welcoming shopping experience. A cinema / theatre is mandatory to the development. Aesthetic of the centre is to compliment the area and not detract from the natural beauty of the surrounding environment. Building is not to overpower the site and block all views of the coastline from the R43. The centre is to accommodate for the local and outlying neighbourhoods, sufficient amenities and parking is to be provided to do this efficiently and provide users with a good shopping experience.

How did the project team work together?

Concept design co-ordinated between the Architect and Structural Engineer. Structural Engineer together with Steel contractor and Contractor workshopped concept to make use of the lightest structural members without compromising the aesthetic and function required by the Architect and Client. Models were shared to assist in reducing clashes on site and reducing on-site alterations to prefabricated steel.

Tons of structural steel used 784 ton

(including wall stiffeners and shopfront supports)

Structural profiles used Mainly I’s, H’s, C’s and angles, Cold-formed lipped channel purlins. Circular hollow sections

 

Cladding profile/ type used Cladding Profile:( Material: 0.53mm Colorbond Ultra Matt) ( Profile: Saflok 700) by Safintra Roofing.

 

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 33 000m²

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Whale Coast Village Mall (Pty) Ltd

HCI Propcom (Pty) Ltd

Sandbaai Development Trust

Shoprite Checkers

Architect JL Design

Bentel Associates International

Structural Engineer Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor MLC Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager MDSA Project Management
Main Contractor Isipani Construction
Steelwork Contractor Mazor
Steel Erector Mazor
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra Roofing
Cladding Supplier Safintra Roofing
Cladding Contractor Cladco Projects
Photographer, Photo competition Fourth Wall Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Videojet Paarl

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?
We were briefed to design the new VideoJet Paarl office and workshop, which is to set the tone for the future of this subdivision of the HG Molenaar brand. The location set at Driebergen Lane,Dal Josafat, on the street face of an existing factory setup, and needed to integrate itself with the existing building. HG Molenaar are pioneers in food process machines, and have the ability to manufacture any high end steel features – this project, would thus, as a showcase for their ability, in a new area of construction, be a sample for their existing and prospective clients, to assert instant respect, trust and faith, in HG Molenaar, to deliver what they promise.

The building is used as an office space, reception and workshop for the VideoJet brand, its MD, support staff and sales components.

What was the brief to the architect?
Iconic building that can be manufactured by HG Molenaar – ie use a lot of steel

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?
Yes it was simpler to connect to the existing steel structure, the client could make the structure, and it would be faster.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?
IPE 200 – Mainly – this section is considered for its aesthetic appeal as its structural strength – client wants to add on third floor at some stage
305x165x40 I Sections – All Beams
406x140x46 I Section – for its Cantilever
101.6×4.0 CHS Struts on Custom plates – with custom turned steel connections
25 Dia Solid rounds to Hang the bridge and floors
Y10 and Y12 Structural Steel to concrete reinforcement
Façade Lazercut screens by client hung on Steel angles – Sheets are 3000x1500x2mm Mild Steel

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)
Complexity – this was simple, we cut a few sample panels to see how we would fix, and whether the apertures were working – also checked the robust nature against potential theft and vandalism. The answer was simple – the design was very difficult to pin down with many stakeholders and opinions.
Innovation – simply used available technology – screens assist in controlling light and vandalism to glass facade

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.
At some stage there was a small 2-3cm discrepancy in height – the entire structure was jacked up and the error rectified with spacers.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?
All steel was worked and machined on site. The client’s involvement assisted greatly with the process. It was also 3-dimensionally pinpointed prior to construction – so the fixing and bolting was a precise mathematic.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)
Entire building was documented up front – no variations, no site supervision, no changes – smooth simple exact.

 Tons of structural steel used +- 2 ton
Structural profiles used US203*203*46
  UB406*140*46
  UB305*165*40
  UB305*133*25
  PLT20*210
  PLT10*250
  PLT10*144.6
  PLT8*200
  L100*100*10
  IPE120
  FL12*250
  FL20*200
  FL12*180
  FL12*130
  FL10*220
  FL10*150
  FL8*90
  D20
  CHS101.6*4.0
 Cladding profile/ type used Sheet metal epoxy coated 2mm with lasercut profile
 Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 175.6sm², 4.95T

 Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Emerging Architecture
Client/ Developer HG Molenaar – Videojet
Architect Emerging Architecture
Structural Engineer Ekon Engineers and Project

Managers

Engineer    Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor    Not provided by nominator
Project Manager    Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor T R S Construction
Steelwork Contractor HG Molenaar
Steel Erector HG Molenaar
Cladding

Manufacturer

HG Molenaar

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Silo 3 and 4

No. 3 Silo consists of three independent apartment towers containing 79 high end apartments over 11 floors. The three towers are connected by two steel framed lift and stair cores enclosed in expanded aluminium mesh, providing spectacular views of the harbour and V+A precinct.

Silo 4 essentially forms the base for the apartment towers and contains an upmarket gym facility over two floors. A double volume pool pavilion faces onto Silo Square, with panoramic views of the new Zeitz MOCAA Gallery, Silo Hotel and surrounding Silo District public spaces.

Expressed materiality and appropriate detailing were considerations equally as important as resolving the functional and programmatic requirements of the brief.

The character of the building was developed as an interpretation of the inherent “gees, (or ‘spirit’), of the precinct as part of a working harbour. In response to the surrounding built environment, the team explored further the themes of ‘fit for purpose, working harbour elements’, and in its making exploited the possibilities of composite structures – concrete and steel working together – in order to maximise the clear floor to ceiling dimensions of the apartments. Concrete up or downstand beams were entirely avoided in order to maximise the views out all of the Apartments, bearing in mind the overall height restrictions imposed by the Planning regulations and consents achieved. Furthermore, in order to construct the expansive floor plates, without resorting to more concrete columns and beams, steel framing ‘tied back’ to the central shear concrete cores, is used to assist in accommodating the floor plate cantilever. This ‘additional steel’, has been consciously ‘picked out’ in colours referencing the cranes and other elements of working machinery in the surrounding dock yards.

The cast-in load bearing steel frames primarily consist of 50mm diameter solid carbon steel bars, adjustable custom reverse thread couplers, welded up 230×90 PFC frames, 203x203x46 H columns and intricate welded end plate connections. Solid bars were chosen for the high tension capacity with minimal lengthening when fully loaded and the custom couplers were chosen to allow for tolerance and future adjustability. The Virgin Active steel roof structure is made up of PFC girders and trusses with solid round bar cross bracing. The exposed round bar cross bracing aesthetic was followed through on the external steel stairs, steel lift shaft structures and the external walkway bridge.  

The installation and sequencing of the load bearing steel frames were by far the greatest steel related challenges faced on site. These frames were designed to work compositely with the concrete structure resulting overall in a more slender structure. These frames were installed concurrently with the concrete structure which impacted on sequencing of slab construction, post-tensioning and temporary backpropping. The interface between concrete and steel required works to be highly accurate to achieve the desired aesthetic of exposed steel and raw concrete as well as work compositely as intended. Communication and co-ordination between the architects, structural engineer, main contractor and steel sub-contractor early on in the project was instrumental in achieving this.

The steel components used throughout the building are integral to the building’s structural integrity. This is expressed through the bold use of colour, further highlighting the key ‘elements’ in the structural assembly. Yellow is used on the façade steel elements that support the cantilevering balcony concrete slabs, while red highlights the two circulation cores connecting the three towers.

Cladding materials, including Rheinzink and perforated metal panels were also selected to respond to the harbour industrial shed aesthetic.

The collaboration of consultants, contractors, sub-contractors, specialist advisors and client was integral to the successful completion of No.s 3&4 Silo.

Revit was used as a production tool by all consultants (as was required by the client), and allowed the sharing of a central digital model across all disciplines.

Tons of structural steel used 320.392
Structural profiles used Solid bars, PFCs,H & I sections, angles, cold formed lipped channels

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Sutherland
Client/ Developer V&A Waterfront
Architect VDMMA & Makeka Design Lab
Structural Engineer Sutherland Engineers
Quantity Surveyor MLC
Project Manager MACE
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor LJ Le Roux Industries
Steel Erector LJ Le Roux Industries
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Advanced Galvanizing
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
MRH Group
Photographer, Photo competition VDMMA

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.