Woolworths DC/ Communications Park

The purpose of the Distribution centre is to manifest in the hardware of the design, the most economical structure, and spatial format that is a combination of built budget, robustness and efficient product flow. The spatial make-up of the entire campus must both serve the myriad of possibilities in terms of vehicle use externally and internally, but also in terms of product storage, staging, incoming goods and out-going goods. Future proofing is a heavily considered aspect. The logistical design is the intertwined set of flows, identifying efficiencies and exploiting them as well as any overlapping synergies and putting this into reality. The architecture needs to respond to all of these.

The brief to the Architect was to co-ordinate the considered logistics, to build to a set budget in the most robust manner and to future proof in terms of a 5 year, 10 year and 15 year vision with multi campuses in mind. The DC also needed to be as vermin proof as possible and simple in terms of upkeep and cleaning.

The project was always going to incorporate steel into the design, as this becomes the most economical and column free way to extend a “shed” type space over a vast span, allowing free flow and staging areas for numerous product flows.

The structural framing is a simple truss and girder configuration, all connected down by steel columns onto what essentially is a vast concrete ring beam that surrounds and protects all the low level docking stations. The economy and design principle that makes this otherwise semi-unconventional, is that 2 separate grid structures were used throughout the build; one below for the concrete portals and one above for the steel. The concrete responds to the most efficient dimensions for maximising docking stations, being extremely robust, and the second grid responding to the steel structure above in the making of the most economical spanning steel structure above. The steel structure is a combination of I-sections, H-sections, Channels, Angles, Circular hollow sections, and Cold formed lipped channels. All these different sections were used for their different qualities to fulfil specific functions whether it’s a sag bar or a bearer beam.

The cladding was a simple vertical clad design, the IBR sheeting was fixed broad flute out with a Colourplus AZ 200 material. The upper 1100mm of the vertical cladding is a continuous polycarb sheet which tucks behind a large structural gutter, then Lapps onto the Colourplus AZ 200 sheeting below. The cladding starts here and is fixed as a single span extruded sheet to the drip trim slightly above the brickwork on top of the continuous concrete ring beam. The resultant gap between the sheet and the brickwork is closed with flashing. The polycarb sheeting to the top, allows natural light to filter into the warehouse and at a level where the building enjoys air extraction, thus allowing the light without contributing to the heat loading of the space. The natural light contributes to our green points in terms of access to the outside, humanising the space, and saving on the day time lighting.

In terms of the fabrication, the major issue we experiences was in terms of the steel accuracy and the cladding and roofing sub-contractors’ challenges with the system implemented. In a building of this scale it is virtually impossible to survey and hand over with everything level and true. We found the implemented cladding and roofing systems were able to deal with the challenges, but with special focus from the design and sub-contracting team. The resultant meetings met with agreement in terms of getting the structure and the covering membranes to work together, especially when fast track is integral to the project. The systems we have developed will certainly be used as a template going forward and improving these aspects of implementation.

The first major aesthetic consideration in terms of the roofing and the cladding, was to use conventional roofing in terms of budget, but to interchange with different colours so as to realise the client’s corporate identity. These simple colour changes brought focus and visual dominance to the office and important ancillary functions of the large scale warehouse complex. This also acts as an intuitive architectural signage within the functionality. The complex can immediately be identified to be owned and run by the client we represent regardless of the specific corporate signage hung from various locals.

The second aesthetic consideration was for the ancillary office buildings to have exaggerated clad elements as barge boards, so as to conceal the guttering, RWDP’s and steel structures behind, without necessarily extending the structure unnecessarily. This also served to neaten the appearance and contributing to the corporate image as mentioned above.

The project teams worked extremely well on this project, as we engaged with logistical experts prior the tender and had advanced the design to such an extent before tender. The building inspector had also commented that in all his years he had never seen such an accurate and finished building as compared to the approved council drawings he was walking with. We are extremely proud of this.

We enjoyed working closely with the contractor, the sub-contracting parties, the suppliers as well as the design team in terms of reaching our goal, well. We were pleased in developing an extensive set of documents handed to the client, dealing with guarantees, warrantees, assembly guarantees, snag remedy documentation and schedules identifying repair materials, repair details, anti-weathering agents and a comprehensive maintenance plan in relation to all that was done. This was also done with regard to the surrounding air as industrial fall out.

Tons of structural steel used 835.5 Tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, Channels, Angles, Circular hollow sections, Cold-formed lipped channels
Cladding profile/ type used IBR sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 7653m2

 Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Woolworths (Pty) Ltd
Architect R&L Architects (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Aurecon Engineers
Engineer Aurecon Engineers
Quantity Surveyor iQS Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager MDSA Project Managment
Main Contractor Stefanutti Stocks
Steelwork Contractor Mazor Steel
Steel Erector Mazor Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Coil Manufacturer (Cladding Supplier) Safal Steel
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Photographer, Photo competition Fourth Wall Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

 

Woodlands Dairy – Uht Warehouse

The purpose of the project was to provide a new warehouse facility which would serve as a central distribution center for Woodlands Dairy UHT products.

Our Clients brief was to design a warehouse of 18000sqm which they would need to occupy on a specific date. An important requirement was that the facility would need to be sufficiently sealed to eliminate any dust ingress and the height needed to accommodate a pallet raking system.

The warehouse was to link onto an existing warehouse and had to maximize the site and would need to be able to accommodate future expansion.

The structure was always envisaged as steel. Due to the extremely tight programme and budget, the  appointed main contractor was requested to investigate alternative methods which could be a cost saving and accelerate his programme. The option of concrete columns where looked at. In the end steel was chosen due to the speed of erection and flexibility of construction. All steel was required to be hot dipped galvanized. Due to the lead time of galvanizing and limitations on steel section lengths, all internal steel was to receive a Sigma coating.

The columns supporting the building was a combination of minimal reinforced concrete internally and hot rolled structural steel I sections and H sections along the perimeter of the building. The roof was supported by structural steel trusses comprising hot rolled angles with hot rolled T-sections used as top and bottom chords. The trusses spanned onto structural steel girders of a similar construction than the trusses. Bracing members were circular hollow sections.

The sites irregular shape and conditions as well as the Clients request to maximize the site, meant the warehouse required to change in angle along its length as well as a change in level due to the site slope. This all made for some challenging structural junctions and sheeting interfaces.

Dust proofing the warehouse was challenging. Junctions between different sheeting profiles of roof bullnose, side cladding and gutter interface as well as where the side cladding terminated at the concrete floor perimeter upstand. The structure had to be enclosed prior to the concrete floor being cast.

If it were not for the fact that we were a well-established project team we would never have achieved the quality of facility provided in the extremely tight time frame given.

Tons of structural steel used 572 Tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, T-sections, Circular hollow sections
Cladding profile/ type used Saflok 410/TUFDEK
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Roof Sheeting 20 140m2

Vertical Cladding 6 443m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Woodlands Dairy
Architect MMK Architects
Structural Engineer Sigma Consulting
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Johnston & Rosser
Project Manager MMK Architects
Main Contractor WBHO Construction
Steelwork Contractor USS (Uitenhage Super Steel)
Steel Erector USS (Uitenhage Super Steel)
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Cladall
Corrosion Protection
Coating
PPG Protective & Marine Coatings
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
USS (Uitenhage Super Steel)
Photographer, Photo competition Impact Studio
Photographer, Other submitted images Impact Studio

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Wilcox Road

Purpose of the structure/project?

The structure is a large span logistics warehouse in Prospecton, near the Durban Port.

What was the brief to the architect?

Maximise the land for a user friendly logistics warehouse.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in the end?

Yes. The structure was lifted by 5m (during fabrication) due to tenant requirements. This was done with concrete columns and some revisions in shop to the steelwork.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used and why?

Castellated columns, lattice girders, angles, tubes, and 450MPa purlin sections.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation)

The greatest difficulty in the cladding was in the sheet length due to the Kliptite concealed fix used. In high winds and due to the roof height and location winds were often an issue and congestion on site only allowed for site rolling in specific areas, requiring additional labour to move sheets on site and up on the roof

Were there any challenges in the fabrication from the engineer’s design. Tell more about fabrication and erection process if difficult, complex, innovative

No.

What is special/unusual/innovative/aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

No. However the Kliptite sheet offered an excellent solution to the client, design, and architectural requirements.

How did the project team work together (contractor involved early, challenges, ease of communication)

Excellent. An outstanding facility completed to the design specification, and forming an integral part of the port and Prospecton sector.

Tons of structural steel used 420 tonnes

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Cousins Steel International
Client/ Developer Newlyn Group
Architect Not provided by nominator
Structural Engineer Cousins Steel International
Engineer Arup
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Voeran Construction
Steelwork Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer SAFAL
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing
Cladding Contractor Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
 
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Insimbi Coatings
Photographer, Photo competition  
Photographer, Other submitted images  

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Tradeport City Deep

What is the purpose of the structure/project?

The main purpose of the structures is to serve as a warehouse facility.

What was the brief to the architect?

The warehouse to be designed with large internal column spacing, creating a versatile open storage area and dedicated racking layout with minimal loss of space due to column interference.  The warehouse spanned over a total of 30,000 m2 in total comprising of three storage segments inside with a 12m clear eave height

 Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes, a combination of a face brick plinth wall with cladding onto a steel structure above plinth wall with roof structure and canopies. A Structural steel truss system comprising of large span girder trusses and secondary lattice trusses was chosen to provide the required clear span attributes.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beam etc) and why?

A combination of hot-rolled H-, I- and Angle Iron sections were used in parallel with cold rolled lipped channels.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the Engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The uniformity in structural shape and sections selected for the design made the fabrication process easy where the erection process could be streamlined.

How did the project team work together (e.g. Contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)?

 The use of Tekla Structures as primary draughting tool facilitated in the communication between design, Engineer, Structural Steel Detailer, and Contractor. Quick response, effective communication, and the ease of understanding the structural scope, that combined with professional team meetings and inspections.

Tons of structural steel used 720 Tons
Structural profiles used        Profiles used were standard columns, beams, lattice trusses and girders (angle irons), some of the ties were Circular hollow sections and the purlins and girts used were pre-galvanized 2mm lip channel sections

 

The completion date of cladding September 2017
Cladding profile/ type used NOVOTEXi Roof Sheeting

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator KRU Detailing CC
Client/ Developer Fortress Fund Developers
Architect ICM Architects
Structural Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing CC
Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services
Quantity Surveyor Quanti Cost Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Fortress Fund Developers
Main Contractor SE Steel Fabrication
Steelwork Contractor SE Steel Fabrication
Steel Erector SE Steel Fabrication
Cladding Manufacturer Pinnacle Cladding
Cladding Supplier Pinnacle Cladding
Cladding Contractor Pinnacle Cladding

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Pepkor Warehouse

The purpose of the Pepkor Warehouse in Hammarsdale is to serve as a distribution centre for the Pepkor group. The distribution centre consists of the following aspects:

  • Total of 80 000m2 of covered warehouse space (180m wide and 440m long).
  • Main Ackermans office and a main Speciality office with 3000m2 and 1800m2 respectively.
  • A total of 4 node offices of 500m2 each.

The brief to the architect and the team for the structural portion of the project was the following:

  • Warehouse to be ±55,000m² for Ackermans and ±25,000m² for Pepkor Speciality in one building as per the Layout Plan.
  • Approximately 17.35m clear height to underside of eaves.
  • Reinforced concrete and structural steel all to Structural Engineer’s design incorporating appropriate corrosion protection where necessary.
  • Internal column spacing will based on a 33.2m x 30.5m grid (4 doors @ 8.3m centres = 33.2m).
  • The structure steel will be strengthened locally to allow for the installation of solar panels to a roof area of approximately 15,000m².

The warehouse was always envisaged to be constructed mainly out of structural steel. The main support columns of the warehouse were designed and constructed out of concrete up to 12.6m and 17m from FFL. The remainder of the structure was constructed out of structural steel.

The structural system used for the building was based on a girder truss system carrying lateral trusses that makes up the main elements of the roof. Various steel profiles were used for the building from hot rolled I-Beams, Angle irons, Circular hollow sections, cold rolled lipped channels and so forth.

The remarkable aspects of this project were the speed at which the steelwork was erected as well as the completion of the overall project. A total of 2500 ton of structural steel was erected (Main warehouse 2180 tons and canopies / offices 320 tons = 2 500 tons), with the erection commencing on 14 November 2017, and reaching completion of the main warehouse structure (2180 Ton) at the end of March 2017 (which includes a builder’s break). This remarkable achievement was achieved over a period of 90 working days to erect on average of 24 tons per day over a period of 4,5 months, using on average 8 cranes on site over the same period.

A sensitive construction program had the steel contractor under pressure from 19 August 2016 which was the date of appointment. Cadcon Steel Construction decided to enter in a joint venture with A. Leita Steel construction to reach the delivery various dates for erection. The on-site production required to meet the construction program resulted in an average of 485 ton of structural steelwork to be erected per month.

The entire project team worked together successfully throughout the entire duration of the project. Effort was made to design the structure in a manner that suits the various contractors involved at each step of the project to reach the various project milestones.

Tons of structural steel used 2 500 tons
Structural profiles used Hot rolled I-, H-, Angle section, Cold Rolled Lipped channels

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator EDS Engineering Design Services (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Rokwil Property Development
Architect T C Design Architects
Structural Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services (Pty) Ltd
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor MHS Consulting Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Dave Armstrong
Main Contractor Abbeydale Building and Civils (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon Steel Construction and Engineering
Steel Erector Fanie Leibrandt Steel Erectors
Cladding Manufacturer Macsteel Service Centres (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Macsteel Service Centres and Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Dram Industrial Coating
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Abbeydale Building and Civils (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images  

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mercedes Benz J-site Logistics Building

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

In order to reconfigure its processing operations for a new model, Mercedes Benz South Africa (MBSA) is looking to upgrade part of its facility based in East London. One of the upgrade works involves the construction of a new logistics building on J-Site within the East London plant. This project involves the construction of amongst other structures, the following:-

  1. a) J site Logistics building,
  2. b) Gate House to replace the existing
  3. c) Hawker Stalls to replace the existing
  4. d) Dry Link connection between the J Site building and the existing F11 Assembly building
  5. e) Truck Canopy

The client opted for a turnkey contract solution for the project and Stefanutti Stocks were appointed on February 2017.  AECOM were appointed by Stefanutti Stocks as their design consultants.

What was the brief to the architect?

The client’s aimed to construct a new Logistics Building with good accessibility for suppliers and a good connection to Assembly to feed the manufacturing process, with the building footprint maximising all available space on the site. The turnkey contractor was to propose energy saving initiatives which needed to be incorporated into the design.  The principal design philosophy is to provide a structural support arrangement which provides a robust and sustainable structural solution, ensuring the space provided is suitable for its intended use.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The Logistics building is approximately 21 000m2. A gridline system of 28m in the East-West direction and 15m in the North-South direction is used. The Logistics building has a structural steel roof with a slope of 2% (1.2 degree pitch).  Hot rolled IPE purlins are spaced at 3.0m and span 7.5m between the trusses. The trusses span 28m and are supported on girders spanning 15m. The trusses and girders are 2.2m deep and consist of UC’s for the top and bottom cords and double angles for diagonals. A clear height of 10m is allowed for between the floor and underside of the roof trusses. All services are therefore located within the roof cavity. To maximise the usable floor area and ensure flexibility for racking layouts, no vertical bracing was used.  This also ensured that expansion of the building could take place in all directions.  To obtain lateral stability, the concrete columns were used up to 8m above floor level and catladders with a perimeter parapet were provided for maintenance.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The exterior of the new building is largely an aluminium cassette facade to avoid corrosion, with corresponding insulation.  The roof is constructed with 2 layers mineral torch-on plastomeric waterproofing membrane that is each 4.5mm thick on 60mm fibre rock wool insulation board. The board is fixed to Safintra Saflok 700 0,8mm thick steel AZ 150 (inverted) sheets, which are in turn fixed to the purlins.  The non-standard 0,8mm steel Saflok sheet was rolled and load tested at the Safintra premises in Pinetown.  This was required due to both the load and spans being beyond the product catalogue guidelines, as well as the sheeting used in an inverted position to provide almost continuous support to the insulation board.  A complete mock-up of the roof system was built at Safintra’s premises for testing purposes as well as on site for the client’s approval.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Little in the way of fabrication and erection challenges were encountered due to the fact that the concept design involved all parties – steelwork contractor, shop drawing detailer and the steel erection team.  Available sections, lead times, splice positions and section lengths, transport and erection were all discussed and agreed on before final design commenced.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The roof design loads on the Logistics Building include future PV cell installation, the self-weight of the built-up roofing system, technical services and conveyor loading.  This loading is far in excess of the average industrial building loading, resulting in a potentially heavier overall structure. Savings on the steel tonnage was however made by breaking away from the norm in utilising hot-rolled purlins, designing out the requirement for sag bars, and truss and girder connections were fashioned to eliminate the need for gusset plates.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All design and contracting disciplines on the project worked within an integrated 3D environment. With the ability to interrogate models virtually before breaking ground on-site led to significantly less RFI’s and reduced critical clashes on-site when compared to traditional 2D based project workflows. Consultants generally create design intent models up to about an LODev (Level of Development) 300, on the J-Site Project we were able to run clash detection bi-weekly against the design Revit models using a combination of Autodesk BIM 360 Glue and Autodesk Navisworks software. The once fabrication models were completed by the steel fabricator in Tekla software, we were able to do our final clash detection checks against with models up to LODev 500. At this year’s Daimler Supplier Awards, which recognises Daimler’s suppliers for outstanding performance, Stefanutti Stocks Pty Ltd was recognised for its excellence in the Partnership Category for the Mercedes-Benz Logistics Warehouse and Gate Complex. This is a reflection of the collaboration on the project between all parties.

Tons of structural steel used ±818 tons including Truck Canopy
Structural profiles used Hot rolled open sections, cold formed lipped channels
Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Tufdek Aluminium Cladding, Safintra Saflok 700 steel decking (0,8mm thick) inverted roof sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 23 500m²    35tons (Roof), 8 700m²    155 tons (Side)

This project overview, motivation and technical information was provided by the project nominator. If you were a part of this project and notice that information is incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.


Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AECOM
Client/ Developer Mercedes-Benz South Africa
Architect AECOM
Structural Engineer AECOM
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Stefanutti Stocks
Project Manager AECOM
Main Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Insimbi Coatings
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Inoxa Manufacturing Facility

The Inoxa Manufacturing Facility project came about due to an international crockery manufacturer’s desire to open a manufacturing facility in South Africa. The facility manufactures products for the South African market, as well as for export.The client for this project was Shree Property Holdings (SPH), who developed the property for lease to Inoxa Manufacturing.

From the start of the project, SPH consulted with both Davgo and Steelkon Projects to find the most suitable structural steel solution for the specific site and client requirements. The tenant required a linear manufacturing process and product flow, which led us to the current design of a 50 metre wide by 350 metre long building.

The building is divided into 3 distinct zones, each with it’s own characteristics in terms of steel structure.The first zone is the Manufacturing Zone, which measures 50m by 143m. This zone comprises two 25ton overhead crane gantries, each with a span of 23m, both of which run the full 143m. The crane rail height is at 9.2m above FFL, and hence the eaves height is at

11.5 above FFL, to accommodate the gantry cranes. Lattice type columns were designed for this zone so as to mitigate against the horizontal deflections caused by forces induced by the cranes onto the rails. The crane beams were designed as compound members comprising I-section beams with parallel flanged channel section caps.

The second zone is the Polishing Zone, which an extent of 50m by 71.5m. Here the manufactured products are cleaned and polished before proceeding to packaging. This process requires ample headroom and the most uninterrupted floor space economically possible. For these reasons, the eaves height of 11.5 was retained, and a centrally located lattice transfer girder was designed to span 3 bays (18.5m), which meant only 2 internal columns were used over the entire 2,600sq.m footprint of the Polishing Zone.

The third zone is the Warehouse Zone, which an extent of 50m x 136m. This is where the finished products undergo QC, before being packaged, and then stored whilst they await distribution. Since the tenant did not require high level racking, the eaves height for this zone was reduced to 9m above FFL. The same roof design as the Polishing Zone was used to keep internal columns to a minimum.

Added to the main building, a semi-detached office structure was also designed and supplied to suit the tenant’s needs. The office structure comprised a suspended slab and roof, with floor area of both floors totaling 5,000sq.m. This was originally supposed to be designed as a concrete framed structure with a steel roof, however due to the tight time constraints the development faced, it was decided to rather use a steel framed structure to support the pre-stressed concrete T-beams & topping slab. The main load carrying beams had to be deep I-sections since the spans varied between 7.5m and 9m. These were compositely tied to the slab by means of Y12 shear connector bars.

The office roof also used a lattice transfer girder in the centre of the 35m span width, resulting in only 4 internal columns over the 2,500sq.m footprint.The steelwork and cladding portions of the job were completed on time and without any problematic incidents, mainly due to the meticulous design, detailing, and planning of the steelwork with one of the main objectives being to minimize the complexity of the rigging. One of the challenges faced was the interaction between the rigging of steelwork and the rigging of pre-cast concrete panels, since the latter required steel members to be temporarily removed so as to allow the concrete panels to be installed and plumbed with ease.

The end result of this project is a landmark building on the KZN North coast, which is both functional and aesthetically pleasing externally and internally. When standing inside the structure, one is not only struck by the pleasing geometry, vast uncluttered space, and striking yellow paintwork; but also by the beautifully detailed lattice columns and girders which create curious geometrical shapes as you move around within the building.

A very satisfied client also adds to the prestige of being involved with this project.

Tons of structural steel used 500 tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, Angles, CHS, Crane Rails, CRLC
Cladding profile/ type used IBR 686 Colourplus AZ150
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Approx. 20,000 sq.m

Project Team 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator DAVGO Steel Construction
Client/ Developer Shree Property Holdings
Architect Zadar Studio
Structural Engineer Steelkon Projects
Main Contractor Shree Property Holdings
Steelwork Contractor DAVGO Steel Construction
Steel Erector DAVGO Steel Construction
Cladding

Manufacturer

Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Future Steel
Cladding Contractor DAVGO Steel Construction

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Heineken Warehouse

What is the purpose of the structure / project?

The approximate 18 800m2 of warehouse area was constructed to provide the client with additional storage capacity for finished product due to increase demand and new logistics strategy implemented by the client.

What was the brief to the architect?

Expansion of the existing warehousing and supporting infrastructure to accommodate market growth and centralise logistic facilities for more cost effective and efficient operations. The project had to be completed in record time (5 months) as the client intended not to renew current rental agreements for existing warehousing, and the new warehousing had to be in operation before the client’s peak sales period over the December holidays.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The warehousing was initially envisaged by the client as imported tent structures cladded with canvas due to financial considerations. The professional team however showed that new predominant steel structure warehousing with IBR cladding built in similarly configuration to the existing predominant concrete structure warehousing proofed more cost effective and more suitable to the client’s environment and needs. Various reinforced concrete components of the existing warehousing were replaced with light weight structural steel components in the new warehousing, which resulted in significant functional and aesthetic improvements and at least 30% savings in building costs. 

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

After careful design considerations, the structural engineer identified opportunities to further optimize the new structural members by deviating from the heavy original structure which had been designed for European snow loads.  As a result hot rolled I-sections were used instead of cellular beams.  The original concrete box gutters were also replaced with steel girders and gutters in order to reduce cost and increase the speed of construction.  This demonstrated the versatility of structural steel as a construction material. The steel also provided the benefit of acceleration by not having to endure a curing period before the structural members could be loaded.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The cladding was specified as 0.58mm thick IBR Chromadek Z200 to suite existing warehouses. The cladding was supported by standard galvanized cold formed steel sections.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

Although the new optimized design showed an approximate 30% saving in weight, no light weight steel members (aluminium) were used on the project.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The construction programme necessitated the complete construction of the 18 800m2 warehouse inclusive of concrete raft foundations in a period of 5 months with 3 partial completion dates for sections of the construction.  This resulted in an extremely tight schedule for manufacturing and erection of the steel. Space frame steel trusses were constructed as cantilever canopies over loading bays. Overhead steel beams were used to increase span lengths between supports and subsequently reduce the number of internal steel columns to optimise floor stacking area. Historically concrete beams were used to support roof structures and box gutters, which were replaced with light weight steel girders in the new warehousing.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding  in this project?

Light weight structural steel components replaced historic reinforced concrete elements resulting in more efficient and cost effective warehousing. Space framed steel truss canopies is more functional and aesthetically pleasing. Steel girders were also used in lieu of the original concrete box gutters.  Circular hollow sections were used for the loading bay canopies to compliment the warehouse aesthetically and also proved to be the most effective structural members that could accommodate the excessive cantilever requirements (12.5m).  Steel was also ordered early based upon workshop approval of certain components in order to speed up delivery and manufacturing.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The 5 months construction period was initially considered unrealistic with inherent risks to all parties involved. The new warehousing was however completed on time and within budget, which proofed to be a huge success. This achievement is attributed to the pro-active solution driven approach adopted by all team members from the start of the project.  Good governance, management, site control, communication, support and cooperation between all team members ensured that challenges were resolved timeously. 

Tons of structural steel used 692 tons
Structural profiles used Various I-Sections, PFC Channels, Equal Angles, CFLC and Circular Hollow Sections (CHS)
Cladding profile/ type used 0.58mm IBR Chromadek Z200 roof sheeting and cladding
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 27 135m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Heineken South Africa
Architect Designdex Architect
Structural Engineer ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Engineer ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Quantity Surveyor ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Project Manager ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Main Contractor AVENG Grinaker LTA
Steelwork Contractor BOKSAN Projects CC
Steel Erector BOKSAN Projects CC
Cladding Manufacturer Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
BOKSAN Projects CC
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
BOKSAN Projects CC
Photographer, Photo competition ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
  Fowlds Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Corruseal Warehouse

The 135 000m2 site is situated in Croydon in Cape Town and is bounded by the R102, the Eerste River, the railway line bordering Stellenbosch and the Steyne Road.  The Corruseal Group propose to construct a world class facility for the manufacture of corrugated cardboard for local industries.  Their requirement was a factory/warehouse of approximately 30 000m2 and associated offices of approximately 500m2 on two levels.  The factory/warehouse was to have a width of at least 150m and was to allow for future extension.  The eaves height was to be at least 6,5m.

The first challenge was to determine the overall shape of the structure.  It is this engineer’s opinion that the basic format of the structure should be determined by the engineer to achieve the most economical and efficient building.  Due to the overall size of the building, the most efficient roof structure was determined to be a barrel vault.  A double pitched roof would have resulted in an unnecessarily high apex with concomitant high gables and a significant increase in the quantity of steelwork and sheeting.  Costs of services too would have increased.  Valley gutters were not considered to be an option because of the potential for roof leaks.  A distinct advantage of the barrel vaulted roof is that when the slope is very flat rainfall runoff is negligible, but when the runoff is at its maximum, the slope is at its steepest.

An extremely large radius of 600m was selected for the curve of the roof for aesthetic as well as functional reasons to limit the height of the crown of the roof to reasonable proportions.  Natural lighting was introduced through the use of monitors which also enhanced the general aesthetics of the structure.  Secret fix Klip-tite sheeting was selected for its slightly deeper profile and its advanced clipping system.  Sheeting was kept to manageable lengths by dividing the curve into three approximately equal sections, with the middle sheet raised by 80mmto avoid a butt joint at the crown where slopes were extremely flat.

The curve of the roof made the use of cellular beams an obvious choice because of the ease of introducing a radius to the rafters.  Cellular rafters were selected also for their aesthetic appeal and their elegant proportions.

The second challenge was to determine column centres which would accommodate Corruseal’s large manufacturing plant, operating system and warehousing requirements.  Through a process of trial and error, the optimum grid for the structure was 6,75m in both directions.  Columns were fixed at 20.25mx13.5m centres with the curved cellular rafters spanning the 20,25m dimension and transverse parallel chord girders spanning 13,5m.  The overall size of the building (centre line to centre line) was set at 162x162m.

The structure was initially designed using steel columns.  However when it came to determining where to locate internal vertical bracing, every position selected clashed with  Corruseal’s operation and reinforced concrete columns were the only alternative.  This decision led to the columns being precast which helped to reduce the overall duration of the project.

For functional and aesthetic reasons cantilever rafters were introduced at the eaves.  This will ensure that rainwater will be discharged away from the sides of the building in the unlikely event that the gutters will be overtopped.  The cantilevers would obviate the truncated appearance on the sides if they were left off.

Detailing of the steelwork was achieved using Tekla software which ensured that only a few minor issues had to be dealt with on site.

Tons of structural steel used 596 TONS
Structural profiles used CURVED CELLULAR BEAMS & STRUCTURAL SECTIONS
 Cladding profile/ type used KLIPTITE 700 AZ 200 ZINCALUME 0.53
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 30000m²

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Macsteeel Service Centre SA
Client/ Developer Corruseal Group
Architect  
Structural Engineer Alan McNaughton & Associates
Main Contractor JNM Construction
Steelwork Contractor 1 Avellini Bros (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor 2 Union Steel
Steel Erector Union Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Blue Scope Steel
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

City Logistics Ceiling

Purpose of the structure/project?

The structure was designed and installed as a ceiling to bring the existing facility into spec as a functioning ESFR (Early Suppression Fast Response) warehouse. Due to the new tenant’s requirements to store tyres, the ESFR system requires the sprinklers at a precise height above the stored product, and consequently a ceiling within a specified ASIB range thereafter to optimise early warning parameters from smoke and heat.

Due to the underside of sheet being too high in approximately 8,800sqm of the warehouse, and the existing steelwork not being able to cope with the new sprinkler loads, the only option was to strengthen the existing steelwork insitu and thereafter provide a ceiling at the required height.

What was the brief to the architect?

To get the existing facility, recently vacated by the Mr Price group into spec for the new tenant, Goodyear.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in the end?

Not necessarily. There were investigations into using traditional ceiling boards and droppers. It was deemed due to the sprinkler weight that truss and girder strengthening was required in either regard, and the subsequent steel roof would be lighter and quicker. The entire project was on a compact and tricky program with significant pressure from the tenant for occupation dates.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used and why?

Hot-rolled: Angles, tubes, and plate.
Cold-rolled: 300mm purlin section and 302 Metsec Z-sections

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation)

All structural steel and cladding was retrofitted to the existing (strengthening) and new (ceiling) steelwork from inside the warehouse, off cherry pickers and scissor lifts. Due to the installation limitations and material handling the sheets were delivered in 4m lengths, as before, all off scissor lifts. Cladding had to span across 78m, in-between sprinkler droppers, lights, electrical cable trays, and at times in-between the existing lattice trusses.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication from the engineer’s design. Tell more about fabrication and erection process if difficult, complex, innovative

Large steel plates to carry the Metsec sections were cumbersome and difficult to install. Wind bracing and box sections (made from 300mm purlins) were installed above the existing truss beneath the existing roof. These were 11.2m in length and had to be lifted off access machines to over 13m and installed in highly restrictive conditions.

What is special/unusual/innovative/aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The steelwork was used to both strengthen the existing structure and provide a solution to the client/tenant’s need to successfully achieve the desired result and make this facility unique and superior to both parties.

How did the project team work together (contractor involved early, challenges, ease of communication)

Excellent. With numerous contractors on site working weekends, night shifts, and in confined areas the project team worked exceptionally well under improbable timelines.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Tons of structural steel used 110 tonnes
Structural profiles used Z – Sections, Angles, Plates
CLADDING
Cladding profile/ type used 0.50 IBR 686 Zincal AZ150
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 8800m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Cousins Steel International
Client/ Developer City Logistics
Architect RHA
Structural Engineer Sotiralis Consulting Engineering
Engineer Cousins Steel International
Quantity Surveyor Quantil
Project Manager Quantil
Main Contractor Cousins Steel International
Steelwork Contractor Cousins Steel International
Steel Erector Cousins Steel International
Cladding Manufacturer SAFAL
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA
Cladding Contractor Cousins Steel International
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Cousins Steel International
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Cousins Steel International
Photographer, Photo competition Cousins Steel International

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.