Refinery Business Park

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project    

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

   

 

48 North Reef Rd,  

Wilbart,  

Germiston  

Google Maps link  
Project Team RoleCompany
Nominator 
Client/ Developer 
ArchitectCimato Moroldo Architects
Structural Engineer  
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor 
Project Manager 
Main Contractor 
Steelwork Contractor 
Steel Erector 
Cladding Manufacturer 
Cladding SupplierSAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding ContractorA&I Sheeters
CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding 31/09/2019 
Cladding profile/ type used Widedek – Thunderstorm and Saflok – Zincal  
Cladding area coverage  2000M² 
Cladding tonnage 50 tons   

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Ascendis Medical

 

Text by AOJ and Gregg Cocking / PRchitecture

This landmark project is located on a prime corner of the Boundary Park Industrial Park development currently underway in Northriding, Johannesburg. The site location and tenant’s large office staff complement led to a less conventional office and warehouse ratio of 60:40. “This model is seemingly becoming more common nowadays with a shrinking global economy and the improvements in technology. Many large companies with distribution facilities are downsizing and consolidating their operations,” says Alessio Lacovig of Architects Of Justice (AOJ).

The tenant, Ascendis Medical, is one such company. With a progressive directorship at its helm, it needed to consolidate three facilities into one to optimise operations and improve business efficiencies. This large and rather complex program was cleverly distributed by AOJ over three floors of P-Grade equivalent offices totalling 6 500 m². Apart from a strong focus around sustainability, the office was designed around two key principals from the onset, one being user experience and the other the creation of a statement building.



In the design, the office footprint was shaped around an irregular open courtyard to increase the perimeter façade. This maximises the building’s presence from the adjacent street intersection, increases the amount of natural daylight entering the building and enhances the external views from within the building. Both the shape of the courtyard and the longer perimeter façade result in a building that appears even larger from the major intersection on which the building is located, emphasising it’s importance as Ascendis’ new head office. The highly intricate and impressive glass corner entrance is the most striking architectural element of the building; shaped to improve passive solar control of the triple volume entrance foyer.

AOJ’s directive to make the building as prominent as possible, and the site conditions, whereby the building sits elevated from the road intersection, made it possible to include a 2 000 m² basement parking level, which at the same time improved earthwork cut-to-fill ratios and stormwater management. This elevation of the building also gives the main foyer and its linked walkways on all floors fantastic views as the surrounding contours fall to the north. “Maybe this was lucky in a way, but it ultimately came about from considering the design early on in the process and thinking of how we could make the most out of the communal spaces,” says Lacovig.


The Ascendis building was the first of four to be designed by AOJ at the Boundary Park precinct. “In order to secure Ascendis as a tenant, Orpen Group, the developer, first needed to illustrate the potential of the development and the site to them, which lead to an initial design pitch, by AOJ, to Ascendis for the building. “This pitch clearly went really well,” notes Lacovig. “With the site being at a major intersection on Malibongwe Drive, a very busy thoroughfare, the opportunity was there to make the landmark building.” The initial mindset focussed on creating a shimmering glass building to relate to Ascendis as a company which competes globally.  

Façade

“Our design was a response to the client’s desire for a fully glazed façade that would suit an international style of architecture, to fit with what is more commonly seen in areas like Sandton but that would costs less to build,” explains Lacovig. “The conventional way to achieve this is to use curtain walling because you’re trying to get glass to span floor-to-ceiling over several floors, and you subsequently need double or triple performance glazing, which further pushes the price up.”
AOJ’s approach was different; they identified the two aspects of most value when making a ‘glass building’, being the user experience from the inside and what the building looks like from the outside. By running the glazing continuously across the length of the office, and from the ceiling height down to 800mm above the floor (effective desk height) and not from slab to slab in a relatively dense office space, you can achieve the desired perception of transparency from the inside. “For a building of this scale, it also reduces the construction cost because there is less glass and it also increases the speed at which the contractor can build on site, because they are now applying a more conventional building method of brick work and openings for windows, rather than having a concrete structure and relying on a single supplier to finish off the façade,” explains Lacovig.
“From the exterior, what this does is reduce the amount of glass on the façade which is exposed to the sun, which automatically reduces unwanted solar heat gain.” A second full glazing element was introduced as an additional skin to the façade. “This second skin is not only the major aesthetic element of the building, but it is also a noise buffer (as it deflects road noise from Malibongwe Road). In addition, a fixed solar control element was added; this also serves as an access walkway for easy cleaning of the windows from the outside,” he says.

Ultimately, it was about creating a façade which was functional, and not just an aesthetic showpiece. “Good design is multifunctional. We needed the large glass façade, and the economic constraints very quickly pushed our creativity to make this element more valuable,” says Lacovig. The coloured blue glass came into play as an idea to tie the building back to the Ascendis brand, and it was designed in such a way that the client can cover it with vinyl in the future if they want. The only break to the glass façade comes in the form of a solid box, in which the building auditorium is housed. This also serves as a signage wall for Ascendis branding.

“The predominant material on the façades of the building is facebrick,” says Mike Rassmann from AOJ. “This choice was largely to reduce maintenance on the building and one cannot get away from the fact that cementitious products are a big polluter of the environment, and if you have to plaster a façade of this size you will be using a large amount of cement, not to mention paint. Using a facebrick façade is in many ways a responsible thing to do, although it does require more attention during construction to get the bricks laid properly.”
Part of the challenge AOJ had was trying to find the right colour brick; “We wanted a modern looking building, and for the brick not to show behind the blue glass. This is quite difficult to do it with facebrick’s earthy, natural tones, so we picked the most muted dark brick available which has the added benefit of not showing dirt as much as a lighter brick would,” explains Lacovig. The brick used in the courtyard, on the other hand, was a lighter colour brick which was specified for improved reflection of daylight within this space.

Courtyard

The courtyard was an integral part of the architect’s design from the outset. “A courtyard in an office building gives you the ability to have a wider office floorplate, because you can have natural light entering the workspace from two sides,” Lacovig points out. “We ended up having a 17-metre-deep floorplate, which, if you illuminate from only one side of the façade, becomes very dark.” This 17m depth is also the consequence of the basement parking grid layout and is well suited for the buildings structural design.
“While the courtyard does create a social space, it was more about making the building energy efficient and more comfortable for users. It enables more natural ventilation and more natural lighting, thus reducing energy consumption as you don’t have to have lights on throughout the day nor do you have to fully rely on mechanical ventilation to moderate the internal temperature, which, in a building of this size can add up quite quickly to hundreds of thousands of rands,” he says.
The courtyard is directly linked with the main foyer reception of the building on one side and the staff canteen on the other. This proximity allows this social space to be used for informal meetings between staff and visitors alike. A covered glass structure creates a walkway that ensures moving to the canteen from the reception is comfortable even in bad weather and also provides sheltered seating space. Large north facing stacking doors can be used to open the canteen space onto the courtyard on more temperate days, and makes this space appropriate for larger gatherings

The building, with a 60:40 split between office block and warehouse is seen more as a head office with a distribution facility attached, rather than a warehouse with an office facility attached. “During the design, there was a toss-up between Orpen building exactly what Ascendis needed at that point, and being mindful of Ascendis’ imminent growth by adding a third floor. This made things a little more complicated for AOJ,” says Lacovig, “but that is part of the process, and despite the back and forward, much of the original design intention remained in the completed building.”


The third floor consists of additional office space for growth and a 100-seater auditorium with meeting rooms as part of a training centre, allowing the company to expand without relocating in the future. On the west corner of the same floor, a bar and outdoor terrace offers a place for staff and visitors to socialise while taking in the surrounding views and setting sun. The warehouse component incorporates a double storey pilot office at the centre of the interface between the warehouse and the yard, giving the operational staff full control over the dispatch and receiving processes. A two-storey staff block with change rooms and worker’s canteen space is linked to the yard of the office, keeping the utility aspects of the building on the same side. A backup water supply is housed on the internal portion of the pilot office roof to keep the facility operational for up to seven days should municipal supply be interrupted, while the warehouse roof was designed to accommodate solar PV panels in the future, which, given the current challenges South Africa is facing, would completely address the need for the building’s water and power security. A higher floor specification was used in a dedicated section of the warehouse, so VNA (Very Narrow Aisle) racking could be used to take advantage of the 14m warehouse height and improve use of the floor area.


“Additional foundation footings were also incorporated into the warehouse floor, adjacent to the courtyard wall to allow for even further growth of the office space by 10m into the warehouse. This would effectively complete the fourth side of the courtyard space. That has not happened – and it might never happen – but it is another way that our design futureproofs the building for Ascendis and Orpen,” notes Lacovig. 

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project 

 

Street Address  

Town

Province

  

 

460 Malibongwe Rd

Kya Sands,

Randburg

GPS Co-ordinates 27956 78, -26.044 789
CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding  
Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Saflock 700/WideSpan
Cladding area coverage 9000m²  + 2300m² 
Cladding tonnage 45 tonnes + 11.5 ton

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra South Africa
Client/ Developer Orpen Group
Architect Architects of Justice
Structural Engineer  
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor Ferrer Hagim QS
Project Manager  
Main Contractor  
Steelwork Contractor  
Steel Erector  
Cladding Manufacturer  
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Hollyberry Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

LG Warehouse

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project 

 

Street Address

Town

Province

2 Sundew Road, Ottowa,Cornubia Industrial Park, 

 

Durban

KwaZulu Natal

Google Maps link 
Project Team RoleCompany
NominatorSAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Client/ DeveloperZenprop Properties
ArchitectHilton Lawrence Architects
Structural Engineer DG Consulting Engineers
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor 
Project Manager 
Main ContractorAbbeydale Construction
Steelwork ContractorCousins Steel
Steel ErectorCousins Steel
Cladding ManufacturerSAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding SupplierSAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding ContractorCladco
Corrosion Protection 
Galvanising 
Corrosion Protection 
Paintwork Contractor 
Photographer, Photo competitionKierran Allen Photography
CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding15 October 2019
Cladding profile/ type usedRoof:  Saflok 700 AZ150 0.53 Zincal   

 

Cladding:  Widedek AZ150 0.47

                 Seaspray & Thunderstorm

Cladding area coverage 23 500 m2
Cladding tonnage121 Tons

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mount Edgecombe Business Park

 

Growthpoint Properties brief for the Mount Edgecombe Business Park Phase 1 called for an upmarket industrial facility that offered a well-designed, aesthetically pleasing, yet practical series of units with maximum flexibility. The economics dictated a cost-effective solution to achieve Growthpoint’s required return on investment to ensure value to the shareholders.

The basic layout comprised of 15 units of 650 to 1800 square meters. The units had to be able to be easily linked together to allow for potential demand of a growing tenant. The Structural system had to thus be clear and flexible.

The site

The site is well situated in the Mount Edgecombe industrial zone near Umhlanga Ridge north of Durban Central. The site provides for easy access to the national roads as well as close proximity to Durban’s northern economic powerhouse.

Phase one had to be planned in conjunction with a second phase across the main access road to achieving one large Industrial Complex that will develop and promote the Growthpoint Industrial Park Brand.

Design solution

In Phase One, the access and on-site vehicular manipulation for the multiple units was the Architect’s priority. The car parking was separated and defined, as far as possible, from truck loading. The result was two steel-framed and cladded “sheds” that best makes use of the rectangular shape of the site. A clever collaboration between the architect and structural engineer in the early design phases culminated in an economic building grid that also accommodates the various sizes of units required.

The sharp lines of the steel cladding wrap the shed in a crisp manner that celebrates the “steel box”. Roof and side cladding read as one, thus accentuating the mechanistic aesthetic of steel.

Continuous clean eaves lines were achieved by the architect by excluding projecting canopies and recessing the roller shutter loading doors. The clean lines of these steel sheds were subtly interrupted and articulated at the Office/ Mezzanine components, using a simple concrete frame cut into the steel cladding.

The earthly muted grey tones and subtle planes of the concrete frames do not detract from the sleek steel shed while allowing for controlled signage and sheltered entrances. These elements add an understated definition and complementarity to the straight lines of the structural steel box.

The steel framed, louvered sun control on the Office façades which fold over the larger windows returns this concrete and brickwork component back to the steel aesthetic and results in a harmonious composition of scale. This Office element allows for expression of the individual tenants and adds an appropriate Urban Scale on the street front which again demonstrates the flexibility of the Steel Building type.

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project  

 

Street Address

Town

Province

54 600094 Street  

 

Mount Edgecombe

KwaZulu Natal

GPS Co-ordinates -29.703360 , 31.038727
Google Maps link  
STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 21 July 2019
Completion date of full project WBHO to confirm
Tonnage and steel profiles used 286 tons – angles, channels, beams and metsec profiles
Project Team Role Company
Nominator SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Growthpoint Properties
Architect Ries Shaw Architects
Structural Engineer WSP Consulting Structural Engineers
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor  
Project Manager  
Main Contractor  
Steelwork Contractor Churchyard & Umpleby Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Churchyard & Umpleby Construction (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor MJC Industrial Roofing
Corrosion Protection  
Galvanising  
Corrosion Protection  
Paintwork Contractor  
Photographer, Photo competition Kierran Allen Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding 6th September 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Roof:        Saflok 700 AZ200 0.53 Seaspray  

 

Cladding:  IBR AZ200 0.53 Seaspray

Cladding area coverage 17 500m2
Cladding tonnage 93 Tons

PX Shed 123

 

PX Shed Warehouses were built as a storage and distribution hub. The warehouses are currently being used by C. Steinweg Bridge. They are a company that stores and distributes a diverse range of products throughout KwaZulu Natal.

This facility has three warehouses in total on the site. Warehouse 1 and 3 are used to store and distribute edible goods and products. Warehouse 2 is being used to store fertilizer; therefore, the initial brief was to design warehouses which could store these various types of products, and also manage to be a distribution facility from a central location. There are also various office components around the site of varying scales allowing for the management and control of this massive facility. 

Warehouse 1 & 3

These two warehouses were designed by the architects and engineers with steel cladding being the main aesthetic. The use of steel structure allows for wide spans to achieve the required uncluttered interiors essential for large scale economical storage. The steel structures both have monitors running along the top of the warehouse, this is to allow light to enter and to have airflow. Together the warehouses are approximately 91 435m2 in total, was envisaged to be done in steel with sheeting. The most optimum type design or structure was for this to be a sheeted and structural steel warehouse. Hot rolled I beam sections, lattis girder trusses, cold formed purlins, and girts were used in the construction of these warehouses. The crisp, clear nature of this simple steel building on the horizon can be appreciated from far off.

The sheeting for these structures were Safintra’s Saflok 700 0.53mm AZ200 Sea Spray on the roof, and Widedek 0.53mm AZ200 Seaspray for the cladding. The total amount of steel required in order to complete these warehouses was 475 tons of material.

Warehouse 2

This warehouse was designed by the architects and engineers in mind that it would be storing fertilizer. All the steel work needed to be specially coated, and the cladding material had to be Aluminium PVDF as fertilizer emits fumes that erode standard materials. So there the design had to cater for this problem. The use of steel structure allows for wide spans to achieve the required uncluttered interiors essential for large scale economical storage. The steel structure has ridge vents running along the top of the warehouse, this is to allow for airflow. The warehouse is approximately 76 291m2 in total. The most optimum type design or structure was for this to be a sheeted and structural steel warehouse.

The sheeting for warehouse 2 was Safintra’s Saflok 700 0.80mm Aluminium PVDF Heron White on the roof. Safintra only supplied the roofing material for this warehouse. The total amount of material required in order to complete the roof portion of the warehouse was 445 tons of material.

Due to the excessive lengths that were required to sheet all three warehouse, on site rolling had to be done with Safintra’s Saflok 700 Mobile Mill. This required both space, planning and lifting onto the roof from ground level. Different sections were milled at different areas of the site so as to help with eased of erection, traffic requirements on a congested site and to minimise double handling of the sheets on site. The sheeting was hoisted to the roof from various sides of the buildings.

Overall the teams of professionals working on the PX Shed project worked well together, and had a great understanding with each other. With this it helped achieve what was set out to be done, and provide a suitable working environment for the client.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project   

 

Street Address

Town

Province

151 South Coast Road   

 

Bayhead

Durban

KwaZulu Natal

GPS Co-ordinates -29.902624 , 30.986170
Google Maps link  

CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding Warehouse 1 & 3      

 

Completion Date:  1 August 2019

 

Warehouse 2

Completion Date:  1 October 2019

Cladding profile/ type used Warehouse 1 & 3   

 

Roof:  Saflok 700 AZ200 0.53 Seaspray

Cladding:  Widedek AZ200 0.53 Seaspray

 

Warehouse 2

Roof:  Saflok 700 Aluminium PVDF 0.80 Heron White

 

 

Cladding area coverage Warehouse 1 & 3   

 

91 435 m2

 

Warehouse 2

76 291 m2

Cladding tonnage Warehouse 1 & 3   

 

475 Tons

 

Warehouse 2

445 Tons

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra SA (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Newlyn Developers
Architect Siza Architects
Structural Engineer Kantey & Templer
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor  
Project Manager  
Main Contractor Patcon Engineering
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Avellini Brothers
Steel Erector Cadcon (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Avellini Brothers
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra South Africa
Cladding Supplier Safintra South Africa
Cladding Contractor Browndeck Roofing
Corrosion Protection  
Galvanising  
Corrosion Protection  
Paintwork Contractor  
Photographer, Photo competition Kierran Allen Photography


If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

K+N Warehouse & Offices

 


The 250 ton K&N warehouse structure is 124 meters long and 84 meters wide. The height of the high roof portion is 18 meters. ⁠ ⁠ The variation in roof height allows for well placed use of translucent sheeting, allowing natural light into the space. The variation also accommodates the client’s racking structure.⁠

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project   

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

ERF 1832;  

 

Green Close 3, 

JT Ross Plumbago Park, 

Witfontein Ext 54, 

Kempton Park, 

1619, 

Gauteng. 

GPS Co-ordinates   26°04’16.0″S 28°16’32.8″E  

 

 

Google Maps link  https://goo.gl/maps/CwKr6YbpxErGxp699 

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  June 2019 
Completion date of full project  August 2019 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  250 tons  

 

 

UB and UC columns, 

Angle lattice trusses, 

IPE, UC and angle lattice girders, 

PFC gable rafters, 

Pre-galvanised CFLC purlins and girts, 

Angle and CHS bracing. 

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hella’s Automotive South Africa

 

The new warehouse and offices for Hella Automotive serve as the gateway to Africa and helps to strengthen HELLA’s administration and logistics operations.

The Architectural Brief

The curved design of the building and roof structure was derived and influenced by the Hella Automotive logo which consists of an oval shape and the word Hella written in the centre. The design, therefore, captures the shape through a seamless oval extrusion through the entire length of the building and the glass façade reveals centrally the activities within the building.

The curved design of the building and roof structure required steel girder trusses that give the building its unique shape.

The unconventional curved design proved to be both economical and supports Hella’s ethos of transcending the conventional. Because of the building’s location adjacent to the freeway and it being experienced by motorists at high speeds, it was an important design consideration to come up with a design that will be both eye-catching to the passer-by and simultaneously provide a pleasant working environment for the employees and promote the Hella Brand.

Architecturally the building moves away from the post and lintel construction where the elements have connection points into a free-flowing structure that blurs the lines between wall and roof.

Cladding

Global Roofing Solutions rolled and cranking sheeting on site. Handling the entire length curved sheeting was challenging to hoist the curved full-length sheets onto the roof. The pictures truly emphasise the complexity which was successfully achieved. 

Global Roofing Solutions rolled and cranked the Klip-Lok 406 sheeting on site. Scaffolding had to be built approx. 6-meters into the air to accommodate the sheet length and curve herewith to roof and clad the building. Having GRS’s quality and technical teams on site to support the accuracy for this detail made it a success. Sheeting was hoisted up using cables and straps onto the roof for installation.

Challenges

Curved, steel girder trusses that give the building its unique shape, but also carries all the load, demanded of the structural engineers to think out of the box. They produced a design and drawings for the manufacturing of these members – without which the building would not have been a success. These trusses were manufactured in a local factory in Uitenhage.

How this project demonstrates the benefits of steel as a material

The GRS Klip-Lok 406 concealed fix steel roof sheeting was rolled out in one length on site to accommodate the design of the building. Special care had to be taken from a Health and Safety point of view since both the plant and the handling of these great lengths can present challenges – especially during periods of high winds.

How the project team worked together

BNM has been involved with a number of industrial projects for the Coega Development Corporation before but this was BNM Architects – Andrew’s first building of this nature. The team consisted of BVI consulting engineers (for structural, civil, mechanical and electrical) and FWJK Quantity Surveyors. The success of the project can only be attributed to a closed working relationship amongst all the members of the team. Jacques van Zyl (BVI) was the Principal Agent. The design was well executed by a very capable contractor – WBHO

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project  

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

  

 

81 Nürburgring Street, 

SEZ, Port Elizabeth,  

6100 

 

Google Maps link  https://goo.gl/maps/e5tUy6QdhwMmXhez5  

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer CDC
Architect BNM
Structural Engineer Bvi
Engineer Bvi
Quantity Surveyor FWJK
Project Manager Bvi
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor  
Steel Erector  
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Scheltema & co
Corrosion Protection Bluescope Steel

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  04/25/2019 
Cladding profile/ type used  Klip-Lok 406 with Curving 
Cladding area coverage   5000m2 (4000m2 roof + 1000m2 cladding) 
Cladding tonnage  31 tons 

SKF

 


The new SKF warehouse is a steel structure composed of girder, truss and tubular bracing systems. Metsec sections were used for the side cladding rails. The warehouse structure contains a 35 tonne overhead crane as well as a 10 tonne gable gantry crane.⁠ ⁠ A key feature of the project is the tubular posts supporting the office slab, as well as the tubular louvre support system which wraps around the building.⁠

 

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project   

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Erf 487  

 

6 Marlin Road, 

Jet Park, 

Boksburg,  

Gauteng 

Google Maps link  https://goo.gl/maps/YRL9FLd8j5xzfKY28 

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  December 2019 
Completion date of full project  March 2020 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  240 tons  

 

 

UB and UC columns, 

UB and angle lattice girders, 

Angle lattice trusses, 

SHS eave beams, 

Metsec purlins and girts, 

Angle and CHS bracing, 

Bent plate box gutters, 

IPE and UB gable rafters, 

UB and angle lattice crane beam columns, 

UB and PFC compound crane beams, 

CHS slab support columns, 

Tubular louvre supports. 

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Corruseal New Offices and Warehouse , Boksburg


Corruseal planned to build the new corrugated cardboard facility along similar lines to the facility it has in Cape Town. This Boksburg facility was planned to be a Phase 1 development with a view to adding to it at a later date.

This initial phase of the factory was built on a greenfield site and would cover an area of over 41 000m2 excluding the gatehouse. The factory required large minimally obstructed spaces to accommodate the production lines and to move materials. It was decided to have columns on a grid spacing of 25 x 13.5 metres throughout. The minimum clear height on the eaves of the production area was set at 9.0 metres. The clients brief included for 1.5 metre high roof monitors to incorporate translucent sheeting and smoke ventilation. Roof loading was required to support a future PV installation.

Why steel?

The project had a fast track construction program of some 6 months so the choice of a structural steel warehouse frame was the obvious choice. The detail of the roof configuration and type of columns was dictated by construction time pressures and practical constructability considerations.

A brief description of the structural framing

The main elements included 25 metre span trusses (or rafters) at 6.75 metre centres which were supported on girders spanning 13.5 metres. The internal footprint of the factory extended some 121 x 175 metres with no obstructing bracing in the production floor areas. All bracing was thus to be located in the perimeter walls. The lower portion of the perimeter walls were to have precast RC panels (varying between 1.5m and 2.1m high) with cladding above the precast walls to the eaves. Alternating translucent cladding strips were included   in the vertical walls to suit the architects’ requirements.

The design of the 25 meter spanning elements compared lattice trusses versus    cellular beam rafters. These elements also had to be fabricated with a 500 metre   “top chord” radius to suit the roof profile. The trusses designed with a 1.5m depth  (with continuity over the girder supports) proved to be a significantly more economical design. The trusses were designed with parallel chords and lacing. Sections selected were all various sizes of hot-rolled angles with gusset plates at  node connections. The 500m radiused chord was easily achieved in this form.

Cold formed lipped channel purlins at 1.562m centres were required to support the sprung effect of the curved roof cladding. The truss bottom chord was braced with hot rolled angle knee braces bolted to the purlins.

 The roof monitors stand 1.5 meters high x 6.75 metres wide (truss to truss). This sub-frame was constructed out of cold formed lipped channel sections (175 x 75 x 20 x 2.5) with knee bracing off the truss to control wind loading on the monitor.

The 13.5 metre spanning x 1.5 metre deep girders supporting every alternate truss were designed with hot-rolled channel sections on the top and bottom chords and hot rolled angles for the lacing. The selection of channel sections (with flat face horizontal) provided an efficient compression strut without requiring addition lateral bracing. The lacing was connected to the channels with welded gusset plates located on the channel centre line. The girders were designed to   be continuous over the supports thus providing further economy of section  weight.

Fabrication and erection

The main challenge on this project was the program.

In order to meet the required delivery dates the footprint of the roof structure was divided into a number of zones that matched the sequence that the structure was to be erected in and allowed for the envelope of the building to be closed in a phased manner. This ensured that all the steelwork in each zone was fabricated ready for delivery when required which allowed the installation to be completed and handed over for sheeting early in the program.

The erection process was also carefully looked at so as to pre-assemble as much of the steelwork onto the roof trusses at ground level before hoisting so as to minimise the installation of the smalls in the air which is always time consuming.

 This method of construction thus allowed the follow-on contractors access to the enclosed structure at an early stage in the construction and enabled the savings on the program to be maximised.

Cladding

The roof sheets were rolled directly onto the roof using a scaffold tower ramp and due to their length required the attendance of a large number of workmen to handle the sheets.

To control the effect of thermal expansion / contraction, the 175m roof cladding length was divided into thirds with the upstream sheet riding over the downstream sheet with a double purlin detail as advised by the cladding specialist sub-contractor.

The skylight roofs however have full length sheets 150m. long which was also decided by the cladding specialist sub-contractor.

How the project team worked together

This project was built with such speed and efficiency that it required a team of professionals, contractors and specialist subcontractors who had experience with similar projects. This experience is critical in order to plan and execute all the activities to merge towards the phased completion dates of the different component parts of the project. The 3D structural shop drawings were very professionally undertaken by an experienced and dedicated operator. This set the critical structural steel component of the project onto a winning footing. 

How this project demonstrates the benefits of steel

The building of a roof structure of this size in the time that was allowed could have only been done in steel and shows that steel is the material of choice when it comes to factory and warehouse roofs. A curved roof of this size is really impressive when viewed from the outside and  is a testament to what can be achieved with steelwork when suitable planning is employed.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project    

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Cnr. Atlas & Commissioner Roads , Boksburg. 
Google Maps link   

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  September 2019 
Completion date of full project  December 2019 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  820 ton : Hot rolled columns , beams , angles , tubes , Cold rolled purlins & girts. 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator TASS Engineering P/L
Client/ Developer Corruseal Group
Architect ZAARC
Structural Engineer Kantey & Templer
Engineer Kantey & Templer
Quantity Surveyor Corruseal Group
Project Manager Corruseal Group
Main Contractor Abbeydale Construction
Steelwork Contractor TASS Engineering P/L
Steel Erector THLN Construction
Cladding Manufacturer SAFAL Steel
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Tate & Nicholson
Corrosion Protection  
Galvanising  
Corrosion Protection  
Paintwork Contractor DRAM Industrial Painters
Photographer, Photo competition Peter Hassall Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  October 2019 
Cladding profile/ type used  Roof : Saflok Zincal AZ150 / Sides : Widedek Colorplus AZ150 
Cladding area coverage   Roof : 42,000m2  ,  Sides : 10,000m2 

 

The Engineering 4.0 building houses the University of Pretoria

The new Engineering 4.0 facility was established and beacons the collaborative effort between SANRAL, University of Pretoria and CSIR. The facility is prominently positioned on University of Pretoria grounds next to the N2 and N4 intersection.
The brief was to accommodate the SANRAL National Road materials Reference Laboratory, SANRAL Training laboratory, and Accelerated Pavement Testing facility, an Active traffic track and an upgraded Concrete research laboratory. Together with the laboratories, the brief required a foyer reception with social and collaborative teaching spaces. The facility was designed with future phases and a masterplan in mind, securing an expandable and adaptable facility to accommodate future Civil Engineering disciplines and related partnerships.


Structural Framing


The new Engineering 4.0 facility required a simplified structure to house a complex programme. The concrete and steel shell of the structure was used to create large expanses of open workspace. These spans allow the options for adaptable internal spaces to safeguard the ever-changing nature of technology and methods in the transportation engineering industry.
Steel columns were used on the ends of the elongated structure with appropriate cladding selections. The east of the facility is made up of steel columns and metal sheeting, which allows easy removal in the event of future expansion. This option was an essential to unlocking the expansion of the laboratory facility and together with the extension of the overhead crane. The 20m spanning overhead crane will continue along the entire length of the laboratories.

The dividing fire wall between the Concrete research facility and the SANRAL National Road materials Reference Laboratory is constructed from steel columns supporting 4x 7850x4800mm size concrete Tilt-up panels.

The foyer area of the facility is made up of a linear grid that intersects a radial grid, determined through a dense existing forest area. The H sections emphasise the rotation of each column along the radial walkway. I-beams were used as the horizontal elements create a continuity in the vertical and horizontal elements and the connections between the two. The H and I elements create a frame for a glass foyer which creates a tectonic environment with a relationship between the interior spaces and the surrounding environment. 

Impressive technical aspects

The project overall had several technical innovative elements.

The soil conditions of the site had its own challenges. Every column footing had to be over excavated by +-2,5m and filled with soil Crete to stabilise the soil.

The laboratory and storage walls and roofs are constructed with concrete Tilt-up system. This is a system where concrete panels are cast flat onsite and lift into positions with a crane. Position of stack casting and crane positions are all planned. The biggest wall panel onsite is an 11 350(h) x 7 490(w) x 150mm thick panel.

Specialised laser floor for the laboratory that was designed by a specialist sub-contractor with high tolerances and hardness. A 900mm thick “strong floor” with M30 x 100 long rebar couplers on a 500×500 grid is installed, with a detail to demonstrate the construction build-up as a teaching tool.

Water harvesting methods have been implemented. Rainwater catchment through roof areas and stormwater design assist in filling the retention pond. Irrigation water is stored in 3x 10 000l JoJo tanks, filled from the retention pond with a borehole top-up.

Solar PV panels have been earmarked to be installed soon, and at the start of the project, the areas had to be identified that the structural loads could we designed accordingly.

How does this project demonstrate the benefits of steel as a material?

Steel is often used as a tectonic element due to its slender appearance compared other structural materials. The project uses exposed structural steel elements in expressing architectural design lines and enhances the visual effect through using colour harmoniously with its adjacent materials and surroundings.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork in this project?

The building as an educational facility was considered as a training and teaching product. The workmanship of this project was essential due to its visibility to public visitors, students and professionals in the field that would visit the facility and experience the building daily.

The aim was to deliver a “product”/project of good quality, that it can be used as a training and teaching tool. There are many instances where exposed structural elements and fixings were considered and made visible

How did the project team work together?

The architect and the consulting engineer worked on a regular basis in the design process of the project. The sub-contractor was responsible for connection detailing and the ideal would have been to have them onboard at an earlier stage to iron out minor detailing of connections. None the less, the team managed to work together in short period of time. Splicing details, cross bracing, column, and beam connections were all specially looked at.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project
Street Address
Town
Province
University of Pretoria Private Bag x 20
Hatfield 0028
https://www.up.ac.za/eng4
Google Maps link https://goo.gl/maps/n2HRwYU3sQHU1DXQ8

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork January 2020
Completion date of full project March 2020
Tonnage and steel profiles used 230 Tonnes – standard HR sections

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Central Welding Works
Client/ Developer University of Pretoria
Architect ARC Architects
Structural Engineer Aurecon
Engineer Aurecon
Quantity Surveyor Gro2 Consulting
Project Manager University of Pretoria
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor Central Welding Works
Steel Erector Central Welding Works
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Paintwork Contractor Dram Industrial Painters
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing
Nomination Document Submission KRU Detailing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.