EMS Head Quarters – Dora Nginza

This building, commissioned for use by the National Department of Health as their Emergency Medical Services Headquarters, houses a call centre and manages the dispatch of emergency paramedic response units within the Port Elizabeth area.

The architect’s brief was to design a building that would aid in consolidating the EMS Headquarters into one centralised location and distribution point, as well as to bring an identity and civic presence to the EMS, reflecting the role that they play in society.

The design, both structurally and aesthetically, makes use of a selected pallet of materials which contribute towards a clean, yet interesting architectural experience. In addition to the main building, the site incorporates covered parking areas for ambulances, parking for staff, a carwash, a helipad, and a helicopter hangar – constructed almost entirely out of steel.

The main building is predominantly a concrete frame structure which makes use of some steel elements, bringing a lightness to the interior spaces. The main structural steel element is the roof structure, constructed from circular hollow steel sections and on display in the main entrance foyer, while steel columns are used to support the peripheral internal walkways. These are complemented internally by steel finishes, such as balustrading and cladding to the reception area.

The structural framing

Steel elements were used extensively for the façade features such as the shading louvre elements, decorative pergola elements, balustrades, and walkways – which are used both for maintenance and shading to floors below. In strategic places the roof eave rafters were also detailed as steel elements which are left exposed to tie in with the external aesthetic of the building, creating large, thin floating planes.

The carport structures and helicopter hangar are constructed almost entirely of steel and clad to match the roofing of the main building. The hangar is a standard steel portal frame structure with purlins and cladding rails.

Cladding

The sheeting selected for the project was the Zip-Tek 420 profile. This was not the original selection as it was initially intended to be a conventional Klip-Lok concealed fix system. This, however, would have resulted in jagged edges and valleys which would likely have caused problems in the future with water ingress and would have detracted from the elegant appeal of the curved building.

The Zip-Tek 420 sheet can be tapered, which allowed for a seamless, elegant roof over the curved building, eliminating the risk of water leaks. With this specific profile being very wide and deep, with excellent water carrying capacity, the decision was made to use it for the entire project.

The tapering of the roof sheeting is a detailed process, which consists of each sheet being drawn and cut individually. Each side of the sheet – both male and female ribs – had to also be rolled individually and not in one single process, as would have been the case with conventional sheeting. In order to make sure that this was a success, and to avoid complications on site, a point cloud survey was done after the roof trusses were installed, providing the sheeting supplier with the exact site geometry to work off. This aided in minimizing risk typically associated with both the manufacturing process of the purpose made sheets, and with the on-site installation.

The tapering of the roof sheeting is a detailed process, which consists of each sheet being drawn and cut individually. Each side of the sheet – both male and female ribs – had to also be rolled individually and not in one single process, as would have been the case with conventional sheeting. In order to make sure that this was a success, and to avoid complications on site, a point cloud survey was done after the roof trusses were installed, providing the sheeting supplier with the exact site geometry to work off. This aided in minimizing risk typically associated with both the manufacturing process of the purpose made sheets, and with the on-site installation.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative about the steelwork in this project?

Curved roof – This unconventional design adds a monumentality to the building and without the innovative use of steel would not have been successfully achieved. Constant co-ordination within the project team and a forthcoming attitude from the contractor certainly aided in the successful implementation of this design element.

How does this project demonstrate the benefit of steel as a material

Decorative steel – Steel is conventionally thought of as a structural material. In this case, its structural benefits were taken advantage of in order to design lightweight walkways and shading devices that added value to the aesthetic design of the building. Had these elements been designed using an alternative material, such as timber, the lightweight nature and economic efficiency would have been impossible to match.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project    

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Spondo Street   

 

New Brighton 

Port Elizabeth 

Eastern Cape 

Google Maps link https://maps.app.goo.gl/zHs49Zu4iwM8ZESX6  
Project Team RoleCompany
NominatorGlobal Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Client/ DeveloperDepartment of Roads and Public Works
ArchitectImbono FJA Architects
Structural Engineer MottMacdonald
Engineer  
Quantity SurveyorSVP Quantity Surveyors and Project Managers
Project ManagerSVP Quantity Surveyors and Project Managers
Main ContractorTranstruct
Steelwork Contractor (Facades and Balustrades)Rizel Engineering Services
Steelwork Contractor (Shading Louvres)Wild Dog Engineering
Steel Erector 
Cladding ManufacturerGlobal Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding SupplierGlobal Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding ContractorRV Smith PE

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  
Cladding profile/ type used GRS Zip-Tek 420 Cladding 
Cladding area coverage  360m2 
Cladding tonnage  

House O’ Connor

 

The design of House OConnor had to make the best of the incredible views of the Southern face of Table Mountain. Further to this, the brief was to create a striking, avante-garde yet homely space with a large open-plan living / dining / kitchen. The architects also wanted to create a seamless link between the indoors and the outdoors.

The use of steel was important from the word “go” as it is the only way the architects and engineers could achieve the large openings and uninterrupted spans necessary to achieve the vision. The project team worked very well together to solve some complex structural challenges, most of which were made possible with the use of structural steel. This is most evident in the large open plan space, the glass and steel “forest link” structure, the floating concrete roof over the entrance hall as well as in the mono-pitch roof structures which interrupt the main “flat” roofs of the house.

The living space is striking in the sense that there are no columns or supports interrupting the space even though one of the mono-pitch roof structures is placed at an angle over the space. These mono-pitch structures comprise steel portal frames with bamboo cladding on the inside and SAFLOK 700 cladding on the outside. The north-facing sections are glazed to frame views of the mountain from deep within the house and also to let winter sun into spaces which would otherwise be cold and dark. One of the corners of the main mono-pitch roof over the living room is supported on a large steel I-beam. This was the only viable solution to this problem as concrete beam would have had a depth of almost 1m to do the same job and this would have interrupted the view!

This same steel beam was essential in order to create an open corner between two large sliding doors from the lounge and dining room. Where one would normally have a column on this corner, the architect and engineer were able to omit this due to the use of steel; when the doors are open there is a complete free-flow of space and uninterrupted views.
The use of steel enabled the architect to create a walkway (the “forest link”) from the living wing to the bedroom wing of the house. There are no structural supports along this walkway, which creates the feeling of walking outside through the garden, though one is still in the house.

Another notable feature of the house is the floating concrete roof over the entrance hall. The use of slim steel posts made it possible to support the roof in such a way that it appears to float above the walls. The gap between the walls and the slab is glazed which means that the underside of the slab is washed with light reflected off the surrounding roofs during the day and with light from strip lighting at night.

Other than these striking architectural features, the use of steel hollow sections for columns and beams made it possible to have large windows and an uninterrupted pergola structure at the outdoor entertainment area.
A steel walkway structure with a bamboo ceiling greets one as you arrive at the house and leads you to the front door, making steel the main element of the first impression of house Oconnor.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project  

 Street Address

Town

Province

20 GEMINI WAY,
CONSTANTIA,
CAPE TOWN
Google Maps link  
STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork JUNE 2019
Completion date of full project OCTOBER 2019
Tonnage and steel profiles used ……….TON.
100X100X4 SHS
120X120X4 SHS
120X120X5 SHS
203X133X25 RHS
76X76X4 SHS
160X80X5 RHS
200X100X8 RHS
IPE 180’s
457X191X98 I-BEAMS
175X74X2 LIPPED CHANNEL
125X50X20X2.5 LIPPED CHANNEL
Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra 
Client/ Developer PRIVATE
Architect JOE DE VILLIERS architects
Structural Engineer GENI consulting engineers
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor  
Project Manager JOE DE VILLIERS architects
Main Contractor ACCURA construction solutions
Steelwork Contractor ACCURA construction solutions
Steel Erector ACCURA construction solutions
Cladding Manufacturer  
Cladding Supplier YOUNGMAN ROOFING
Cladding Contractor ACCURA construction solutions
Corrosion Protection  
Galvanising  
Corrosion Protection  
Paintwork Contractor ACCURA construction solutions
Photographer, Photo competition  
CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding OCTOBER 2019
Cladding profile/ type used SAFLOK 700
Cladding area coverage 360m2 including roof

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Pods at Dwarsberg Trout Hideaway

 

 

Dwarsberg Trout hideaway brief the architect to design pod units for a vacant portion of the farm to be used as guest accommodation. The client initially requested to make use of shipping containers to form the structure. The architect underwent a process of investigating repurposing shipping containers but due to the limitation in design, challenges with transport and the complexity of building with containers, it was suggested working with light steel. The client’s inspiration from shipping containers was used to inform the cladding of the structure and the dark grey charcoal colour was chosen to allow the units to fade in the landscape.

The light steel frame allowed for more freedom in design, construction was simplified since only a few skilled labourers are necessary and the time on site was reduced.

The lightweight steel frame was used to form the structure as this was easy to design off site and assemble on site.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project   

Street Address

Town

Province

FARM 1/794,
DWARSBERG,
WORCESTER
GPS Co-ordinates Dwarsberg Farm 33°47’16.6″S 19°19’47.5″E, Rawsonville, 6845

 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Dwarsberg Trout Hideaway
Architect ModH Design
Structural Engineer Frame group
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor  
Project Manager Spaas
Main Contractor  
Steelwork Contractor  
Steel Erector  
Cladding Manufacturer  
Cladding Supplier  
Cladding Contractor  
Corrosion Protection  
Galvanising  
Corrosion Protection  
Paintwork Contractor  
Photographer, Photo competition Peartree
CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding July 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Corrugated sheeting
Cladding area coverage External walls & roof.

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

The Engineering 4.0 building houses the University of Pretoria

The new Engineering 4.0 facility was established and beacons the collaborative effort between SANRAL, University of Pretoria and CSIR. The facility is prominently positioned on University of Pretoria grounds next to the N2 and N4 intersection.
The brief was to accommodate the SANRAL National Road materials Reference Laboratory, SANRAL Training laboratory, and Accelerated Pavement Testing facility, an Active traffic track and an upgraded Concrete research laboratory. Together with the laboratories, the brief required a foyer reception with social and collaborative teaching spaces. The facility was designed with future phases and a masterplan in mind, securing an expandable and adaptable facility to accommodate future Civil Engineering disciplines and related partnerships.


Structural Framing


The new Engineering 4.0 facility required a simplified structure to house a complex programme. The concrete and steel shell of the structure was used to create large expanses of open workspace. These spans allow the options for adaptable internal spaces to safeguard the ever-changing nature of technology and methods in the transportation engineering industry.
Steel columns were used on the ends of the elongated structure with appropriate cladding selections. The east of the facility is made up of steel columns and metal sheeting, which allows easy removal in the event of future expansion. This option was an essential to unlocking the expansion of the laboratory facility and together with the extension of the overhead crane. The 20m spanning overhead crane will continue along the entire length of the laboratories.

The dividing fire wall between the Concrete research facility and the SANRAL National Road materials Reference Laboratory is constructed from steel columns supporting 4x 7850x4800mm size concrete Tilt-up panels.

The foyer area of the facility is made up of a linear grid that intersects a radial grid, determined through a dense existing forest area. The H sections emphasise the rotation of each column along the radial walkway. I-beams were used as the horizontal elements create a continuity in the vertical and horizontal elements and the connections between the two. The H and I elements create a frame for a glass foyer which creates a tectonic environment with a relationship between the interior spaces and the surrounding environment. 

Impressive technical aspects

The project overall had several technical innovative elements.

The soil conditions of the site had its own challenges. Every column footing had to be over excavated by +-2,5m and filled with soil Crete to stabilise the soil.

The laboratory and storage walls and roofs are constructed with concrete Tilt-up system. This is a system where concrete panels are cast flat onsite and lift into positions with a crane. Position of stack casting and crane positions are all planned. The biggest wall panel onsite is an 11 350(h) x 7 490(w) x 150mm thick panel.

Specialised laser floor for the laboratory that was designed by a specialist sub-contractor with high tolerances and hardness. A 900mm thick “strong floor” with M30 x 100 long rebar couplers on a 500×500 grid is installed, with a detail to demonstrate the construction build-up as a teaching tool.

Water harvesting methods have been implemented. Rainwater catchment through roof areas and stormwater design assist in filling the retention pond. Irrigation water is stored in 3x 10 000l JoJo tanks, filled from the retention pond with a borehole top-up.

Solar PV panels have been earmarked to be installed soon, and at the start of the project, the areas had to be identified that the structural loads could we designed accordingly.

How does this project demonstrate the benefits of steel as a material?

Steel is often used as a tectonic element due to its slender appearance compared other structural materials. The project uses exposed structural steel elements in expressing architectural design lines and enhances the visual effect through using colour harmoniously with its adjacent materials and surroundings.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork in this project?

The building as an educational facility was considered as a training and teaching product. The workmanship of this project was essential due to its visibility to public visitors, students and professionals in the field that would visit the facility and experience the building daily.

The aim was to deliver a “product”/project of good quality, that it can be used as a training and teaching tool. There are many instances where exposed structural elements and fixings were considered and made visible

How did the project team work together?

The architect and the consulting engineer worked on a regular basis in the design process of the project. The sub-contractor was responsible for connection detailing and the ideal would have been to have them onboard at an earlier stage to iron out minor detailing of connections. None the less, the team managed to work together in short period of time. Splicing details, cross bracing, column, and beam connections were all specially looked at.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project
Street Address
Town
Province
University of Pretoria Private Bag x 20
Hatfield 0028
https://www.up.ac.za/eng4
Google Maps link https://goo.gl/maps/n2HRwYU3sQHU1DXQ8

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork January 2020
Completion date of full project March 2020
Tonnage and steel profiles used 230 Tonnes – standard HR sections

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Central Welding Works
Client/ Developer University of Pretoria
Architect ARC Architects
Structural Engineer Aurecon
Engineer Aurecon
Quantity Surveyor Gro2 Consulting
Project Manager University of Pretoria
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor Central Welding Works
Steel Erector Central Welding Works
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Paintwork Contractor Dram Industrial Painters
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing
Nomination Document Submission KRU Detailing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

New Barloworld and Caterpillar Head Office and Showroom

The new Barloworld and Caterpillar head office and showroom in Isando. is dedicated to heavy earthmoving equipment. The development consists of a head office, world-class showroom and new training campus.

The showroom alone is a first-of-a-kind in the country and is split into two zones, namely “tyre” and “track” product categories, with both open and enclosed areas. Emmy Leeka, CEO of Barloworld Equipment, said the project was conceptualised as a series of iconic buildings nestled in an indigenous landscape, with the showroom facing the R24 highway for maximum exposure.

 

Features of the new building

The head office, comprising two elongated buildings, are linked by an enclosed glazed bridge.
Its design encompasses flush-glazed strip windows. The prevalence of glass in both buildings ensures maximum sunlight because of their north-facing orientation. This minimises the need for artificial heating and lighting.
Both the head office and showroom roof structures were designed to cater for photovoltaic panels.
The most immediately noticeable feature of the new showroom structure is its elongated front-facing bubble profile, inspired by the curved shape of the Caterpillar excavator tread. Not only is this an iconic visual tribute to the legendary earthmoving equipment showcased within, but it also allows this huge machinery to be comfortably exhibited in the voluminous interior space this design creates. Couple this with a vast glass façade, which makes the interior exhibit perfect visibility of the busy R24 highway, and this becomes far more than a cutting-edge combination of corporate head office and flagship showroom. How can such huge apparatus easily enter or be extracted from this space? The building claims a never-been-done-before international breakthrough with a staggering 8.8m x 5.5m piece of the prominent glass frontage being fully retractable via intricate motor-driven automation.


The architectural brief

Fittingly, Barloworld Equipment’s impressive new head office and Caterpillar equipment showroom in Isando breaks new ground. It was a monumental brief – Barloworld Equipment, dealer for iconic Caterpillar earthmoving equipment, was leaving Sandton and wanted a state-of-the art head office on the R24 at Isando that reflected their corporate identity and accommodated staff in comfort. But beyond that, they wanted the development to include a flagship Caterpillar showroom for their equipment – excavators loaders, dozers and graders that build the nation’s roads, dams, harbours and airports, and are usually too big to accommodate indoors except in barnlike servicing warehouses out of the spotlight.

‘This is the first showroom in the country dedicated to heavy earthmoving equipment,’ says Aashen Lalloo, development manager at Eris Property Group. ‘The brief to Paragon Architects was to balance iconic design with functional aesthetics while maintaining a cost-effective solution.’ 

Paragon, of course, were up for the challenge – the design power behind some of the most advanced buildings in the country, they relish pushing the envelope architecturally and technically, reaping awards with the likes of Sasol Place, Alice Lane and 140 West. Their approach to Barloworld Equipment was both simple and singular. ‘Who hasn’t played with toy earthmovers as a kid?’ says David Cloete, the architectural technician Project Leader for the project. ‘We wanted to hero the equipment, and it may sound corny, but some of the best ideas came when we bought a set and played with them while brainstorming.’
They began with what has become a Paragon signature: the two-tower building linked by an atrium and brought it down to earth to conform to the height restrictions of a site close to OR Tambo International. The result was two long, low structures – one three storeys, for the showroom, the other two storeys, for offices. Then taking inspiration from the circular tracks of a classic Caterpillar earthmover, they turned them into what Cloete calls ‘two bubble shapes’ – striking, glass-walled edifices, floating on a low podium above a semi-basement parking level, and linked by an enclosed glazed glass bridge, covering 4500m² all told.

The 3200m² showroom bubble was built to face directly on the busy R24 – creating the ultimate traffic stopper, commanding immediate attention with its striking shape and the machinery that inspired it displayed inside in two sections, one for track Caterpillars, the other for those with tyres. Beyond this, just that glass corridor away, lie the company headquarters: two floors of flexible open-plan office space with sophisticated floor-to- ceiling flush-glazed windows.

It was an ingenious solution, but hard won. The challenges began with the very earth the structures stand on, which is the clay variety and notoriously unsteady, especially after torrential Gauteng rains. ‘Not ideal for building foundations,’ as Cloete says. ‘For a high-rise like most of our projects, you need to dig deep, but because we were only going up three story’s, we dug just three meters below the surface and laid man-made sub-surface to compact the soil beneath a raft foundation. It needed to support all that Caterpillar equipment, and the biggest pieces weigh up to 60 tons.’

Next challenge was the dimensions of the showroom, and how to move the equipment in and out. ‘It requires massive clearance in height as well as width to turn one of these mammoths.’ Paragon took for its starting point the roller shutters used to access the Caterpillar servicing warehouses. ‘But we wanted to use glass, not metal.’ So in what they believe is a world first, they elected to vertically slide a 8.4m by 5.5m section of the high-performance glass frontage upwards, using a complex motor system installed upstairs and hung from a structural beam.

The challenges did not end there. Architecturally, the only straight feature in the bubble structures is their glass frontage, and Paragon needed to achieve curved roofs and sides that sealed with the straight lines to make the structures weatherproof and insulate them thermally. Here again, the solution was deceptively simple: ‘Good old corrugated iron,’ says Cloete with satisfaction. ‘I love its connotations of industry and farms, where Caterpillar has its roots with its creation of factories and dams. It worked spectacularly and helped bring in the project on budget.’

A steel girder framework was created to provide for the track-shaped design of each of the two bubbles, with large spanning trusses that carry the roofs, all sitting on a specially devised grid (‘increased to 12m or 15m,’ says Cloete) to accommodate the different-sized equipment required. Then the corrugated iron was applied like an external skin.  

Throughout it all, Paragon worked closely with Trencon Construction, the main contractor. ‘We operated as a team, which was of paramount importance given with the intricacies of design combining the use of glass and steel,’ says Trencon contracts manager Ernst Bezuidenhout. The steel structure was difficult both to manufacture and erect, and they used tension cables in the roof structure to help with installation of the glass and adjust the fit of the façade panels.

Although the developers were not targeting a green-star rating, Paragon practices ensure all their projects would qualify for at least three green stars, Cloete says. ‘So, we oriented the two buildings to face north to ensure maximum sunlight and minimize the need for artificial lighting and heating. And we designed the roof structures to cater for photovoltaic panels for solar power, to feed the electrical requirements for the offices.’ The flush-glazed unitized glass façades feature performance glass, and the canopy formed over these by the roofing have a sizeable 3.5m cantilever (another Paragon signature), that provides shading in summer while being exposed in winter, heating the interiors naturally.

Sustainable Building Features

The Barloworld Equipment head office building and showroom incorporate green elements in line with Paragon’s practices:
They were positioned to face north to reduce energy requirements.
The roof structures for both bubbles were designed to cater for photovoltaic panels.
The canopy of the top edge of the bubble design facade has a 3.5m cantilever to give substantial shading in summer, but the façade is exposed in winter to heat the internal space naturally.
Low-rated sanitary fittings were specified throughout for minimal water consumption.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start?

Yes, in short this would have not been possible to achieve the desired design without the use of steel as explained below. The project was envisaged to be steelwork from the start, but not all elements: The steel fascia trim along the length of the building was investigated to make use of a different material, however structural steelwork proved to be the only material that proved flexible enough to form the required shape.

The roof structures to cater for photovoltaic panels for solar power, to feed the electrical requirements for the offices.’ The flush-glazed unitized glass façades feature performance glass, and the canopy formed over these by the roofing have a sizeable 3.5m cantilever .

The two ends of the building consist of curved structural steel horizontal sheeting that both cantilevers out about 15m from the base and is about 15m tall. This presented an engineering challenge to keep the deflections within allowable limits whilst also keeping the structural elements economical and within the allowed sizing envelope, especially since the large cantilever bow also carried a flush glazed façade which has very stringent allowable deflections. We made use of stressed cables to hang the bowing cantilever arches from the remainder of the roof.

To control and monitor deflections and to ensure the safe erection of the structure we issued the contractor with specific installation methodologies and sequences to follow. The cables needed to be stressed in two sequences at certain times during the erection process to ensure that they did not over-stress the structure which did not yet carry all the building’s self-weight. We also requested that the cables were kept open for final adjustment if required up to the very end of the project before having them trimmed and instructed the contractor to take accurate surveys of the structural steel positions as it was being erected and finalized.

These two end barrels of the building imposed significant horizontal forces onto the roof that needed to be catered for. We made use of brace bays to take these loads back to the foundations however there was no opportunity for any bracing to the front of the building since it was to be a fully retractable glass façade. Instead we pulled the one vertical brace to the floor back to the nearest acceptable position which was beyond the centroid of the barrel load which whilst still feasible increased the loads onto the bracing system significantly. 

Curved plate girder channels and compound curve RHS sections made from plate were difficult to fabricate and install while maintaining the fixed glass support line on site.

Impressive Technical Aspects of this project

The building curves in 2 planes – These two end barrels of the building imposed significant horizontal forces onto the roof that needed to be catered for.
The head office, comprising two elongated buildings, are linked by an enclosed glazed bridge.
Its design encompasses flush-glazed strip windows. The prevalence of glass in both buildings ensures maximum sunlight because of their north-facing orientation. This minimises the need for artificial heating and lighting.
Both the head office and showroom roof structures were designed to cater for photovoltaic panels.
The most immediate noticeable feature of the new showroom structure is its elongated front-facing bubble profile, inspired by the curved shape of the Caterpillar excavator tread. Not only is this an iconic visual tribute to the legendary earthmoving equipment showcased within, but it also allows this huge machinery to be comfortably exhibited in the voluminous interior space this design creates.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork in this project?

The two ends of the building consist of curved structural steel horizontal sheeting hat both cantilevers out about 15m from the base and is about 15m tall. This presented an engineering challenge to keep the deflections within allowable limits whilst also keeping the structural elements economical and within the allowed sizing envelope, especially since the large cantilever bow also carried a flush glazed façade which has very stringent allowable deflections. We made use of stressed cables to hang the bowing cantilever arches from the remainder of the roof.

To control and monitor deflections and to ensure the safe erection of the structure we issued the contractor with specific installation methodologies and sequences to follow. The cables needed to be stressed in two sequences at certain times during the erection process to ensure that they did not over-stress the structure which did not yet carry all the building’s self-weight. We also requested that the cables were kept open for final adjustment if required up to the very end of the project before having them trimmed and instructed the contractor to take accurate surveys of the structural steel positions as it was being erected and finalized.

These two end barrels of the building imposed significant horizontal forces onto the roof that needed to be catered for. We made use of brace bays to take these loads back to the foundations however there was no opportunity for any bracing to the front of the building since it was to be a fully retractable glass façade. Instead we pulled the one vertical brace to the floor back to the nearest acceptable position which was beyond the centroid of the barrel load which whilst still feasible increased the loads onto the bracing system significantly. 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project Street Address
Town
Province
Electron Avenue Ext,
Isando, 1600
Google Maps link https://goo.gl/maps/DYb8LbbVDTNTUA8t8

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork August 2019
Completion date of full project December 2019
Tonnage and steel profiles used Plate girder channels and curved beams + normal HR sections 220 tonnes

 

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  September 2019 
Cladding profile/ type used  Corrugated 10½ & Klip-Tite 
Cladding area coverage   ± 11 165m²  Both cantilevers out about 15m from the base and is about 15m tall
Cladding tonnage  Klip-Tite = 34 537 Ton & Corrugated = 48 279 Ton 

Nominator

Central Welding Works

Nominator

Global Roofing Solutions

Client/ Developer

Eris Property Group

Architect

Paragon Architects

Structural Engineer

DG Consulting Engineers

Engineer

DG Consulting Engineers

Quantity Surveyor

Matla Quantity Surveyors 

Project Manager

SIP Project Managers

Main Contractor

Trencon Construction (Pty) Ltd

Steelwork Contractor

Central Welding Works

Steel Erector

Central Welding Works

Cladding Manufacturer

Global Roofing Solutions

Cladding Supplier

Global Roofing Solutions

Cladding Contractor

Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd.

Paintwork Contractor

Dram Industrial Painters

Paintwork Contractor

First Class Projects CC 

Structural Steel Detailer

KRU Detailing

Nomination Document Submission

KRU Detailing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

28 Day Modular House

 

 

RAW Module’s innovative approach presupposes the idea that high-end construction does not have to be a time-consuming and complex process, whether one is building a home or office. The ground-breaking Compact Modular system focusses on off-the-shelf pre-engineered modules – the optimum combination of flexibility and efficiency. The ultimate test was passed with flying colours when RAW Module built a 158m2 house on a stringent World Heritage Site, within 28 days, proving their methods are innovative and environmentally friendly.

Raw Innovation: Inventive Methodology – What is “Compact Modular”?

All services and elements of a room are concentrated into a single, smaller space to harness the advantages of offsite production. Electrical, water, ventilation, heating, cooling, smart technology, shop fitting and finishes are installed within each module. Costs and site activity are reduced as skilled work is completed in a factory. By compacting the elements into a standard, containerised module, no “empty spaces” are transported from the factory to the site.

Each module is designed to fit into a standard high-cube shipping container that can be transported anywhere in the world. In other words, RAW Module can “ship” labour from country to country. This reduces the cost of building locally and abroad and retains a strong labour force in South Africa.

Off-the-Shelf Module Library

RAW Module offers a library of off-the-shelf modules that can be mass-produced, ready for delivery when needed. Advantages of off-site manufacturing include quality control, the economy of scale and mass purchasing power. As RAW Module can take advantage of favourable labour costs and exchange rates, they can compete in global markets.

The Importance of Steel – How modules are made

A steel frame forms the base of the module. 100x100x3mm square hollow sections support overhead structures, be it another floor or the roof. Inner supporting wall struts and services installations are then reticulated within the frame. Furniture, cupboards, or other shop fittings are built into the frame and clients may choose the final colour and finishes of the module.

The Benefits of Using Steel in the Modules

Superior Precision – Precision-engineered steel-framed modules allow for tight-fitting connections and rapid construction.

Exceptional Strength and Rigidity – The steel’s strength allows for more open floorplans as steel can span long distances without the need for load-bearing walls; larger room spaces are created by using single, compact modules. The rigid steel frames prevent damage and the seams in the module walls do not crack during transportation.

Long-Term Durability – With the strength of steel ensuring a long lifespan and minimal maintenance, buildings constructed using the Compact Modular system enjoy the option of permanent or temporary placements. Steel endures impact without sustaining damage and absorbs lateral torsion making it the best base for a module.

Resistance to Fire, Pests and Mould – In both residential and commercial builds, steel is ideal as it is non-combustible and naturally resistant to mould and pests.

High Sustainability – Steel, in industry standards, is precision-manufactured to minimise waste. Any leftover pieces can be recycled without sacrificing steel’s strength. The steel frames from modules taken from disassembled, temporary structures can be refurbished for new modules or can be recycled.

Common Knowledge and Versatility – Building components are easily fixed to the modules with simple steel-to-steel connections that are readily available and come in standard bolt sizes. As steel is a familiar construction material in South Africa, it allows a simplified building process for contractors and labourers. The innovative building method is easy to grasp and adapt to.


Simplified Construction

RAW Module is a hybrid of conventional building and Modern Methods of Construction (MMC). Conventional building methods maximise flexibility and customisation of size, layout and design, but lack the speed, efficiency and quality of a volumetric modular structure. The volumetric modular building system has the disadvantage of being too large to manufacture and store. Transportation and delivery are limited to the proximity of the factory. The Compact Modular system combines the efficiency, flexibility and mobility of the many varied types of construction.

How the 28 Day Module House benefitted from RAW Module

Restricting Site and Design Aesthetic – The 28-Day Modular House was built on a World Heritage site. While there are many limitations to what can be built on this kind of site, the client was permitted to build on an existing slab given that it matched the style of the existing IBR clad, barn-style buildings. One challenge faced by the modular construction industry is that built projects do not have the look and feel of traditional houses. RAW Module successfully achieved the efficiency of a modular construction method combined with a “brick and mortar feel” house.

Environmentally Friendly for a Delicate Site – Due to the sensitivity of the site, the land surrounding the concrete slab could not be uplifted or dug into, so the house had to be built on the existing slab.

Dry Construction – As water is a scarce resource, it was necessary to limit the use of water during construction. The environment was unharmed as there was little to no upliftment or washing away of soil into the nearby river. 

Less Waste – Off-the-shelf modules are factory-built so there is exceptionally low wastage; offcuts can be repurposed for other modules. When this house was built, the shipping container used for transporting the modules was recycled into a storeroom. It also acted as the main load-bearing structure for the garage and storeroom.

Circular Building – Although this house is classified as a permanent structure, all buildings have a certain lifespan. Given the need in a World Heritage site, the house can be easily dismantled and reused for other projects.

Lower CO2 Emissions – With fewer specialists, contractors and deliveries to site, the carbon footprint is dramatically lower.

Additionally, by having a house built so quickly and with most of the large and noisy production taking place off-site, there is lower noise pollution and less land pollution.

Rapid Building Process

By building on an existing slab, the bulk of the house’s structure was erected on the first day on site. By the end of day 1, all modules and structural posts were fixed to the slab. By day ten, all exterior structural work and interior drywalls had been completed. After this, the interior work could commence. As the modules hold most of the small items that take a lot of time to fit, the interiors could be completed quickly. 

Cost Comparison

RAW Module was able to compress the schedule. With fewer days on-site, fewer specialists involved and fewer damages to the surrounds, the client saved on expenses. It is usually more expensive (increased delivery costs, call out fees, etc) to build further from town with long distances between the factory and site, however, with a majority of the fine detailed work pre-installed in the modules, prices drastically decrease even if commuting.

Conclusion

RAW Module’s tried-and-tested construction method easily facilitates smart technology. Even in stringent conditions, RAW offers a modern, attractive and comfortable home. Greener. Faster. Smarter. That is how they build.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project
Street Address
Town
Province
32 Sterkfontein Caves Road
Kromdraai
Gauteng
Google Maps link https://www.google.co.za/maps/place/TYO+Retreat+Centre/@- 26.0063892,27.7518607,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x1e9 59ab1252dae17:0x5fef9253604056c0!8m2!3d26.0063892!4d27. 7540494

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 16 November 2018
Completion date of full project 13 January 2019
Tonnage and steel profiles used Total tonnage: 4.73 Tonnes   Profiles: Modules: 100x100x3mm SHS (3276kg) Ring Beam: 200x100x3mm RHS (1241.2 kg) Steel Columns: 100x100x3mm SHS (208.98 kg)

Project Tem Role

Company

Nominator

RAW Module

Client/ Developer

Mosaiek Church Npc

Architect

RAW Module

Structural Engineer

BA Engineers

Engineer

Quantity Surveyor

Project Manager

Raw Module

Main Contractor

Raw Module

Steelwork Contractor

Rbu Engineering

Steel Erector

Rbu Engineering

Cladding Manufacturer

SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Cladding Supplier

SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Cladding Contractor

Hollyberry Roofing

Galvanising

 –

Paintwork Contractor

 –

Photographer, Photo competition

Serfontein Solutions

Photographer, Other submitted images

RAW Module

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

 

 

 

Rise Student Living – Units on Park

 

Located in Park Street, Hatfield, Pretoria this project offers affordable student accommodation, aimed for the NSFAS students, within close proximity to the University of Pretoria and the Hatfield Gautrain Station. The architects’ approach and design philosophy with student accommodation consist of a framework with a definite balance between social and academic spaces that focusses on the well-being of students through striking architecture.


Being situated in a context with an influx of buildings associated with student accommodation the building had to be unique and therefore focus was placed upon bringing colour to an urban environment.

Architectural brief

The brief of the architect was to design the footprint of this building as a reaction to the somewhat complicated site. Due to the Gautrain being adjacent to the building, the footprint was designed and precisely located in such a manner to react to the vast expropriated area of the Gautrain.

 

The concept of the floorplan is to find the perfect balance of importance between the accommodation and the social spaces. The two ‘wings’ are connected in such a way to define and articulate courtyard spaces and encourage students to experience and utilise these social spaces.

Furthermore, the originality of the building can be seen from any of the surrounding streets. The colourful sea of balconies, on both facades, brightens the harsh urban fabric of the surrounding context. These balconies not only serve as the face of the building but also offer a washing line space for students who could not necessarily afford laundry services.   

The important ‘element of youthfulness’ was one of the main drives when looking at the overall design of the building. Not only can this be experienced from the outside of the building but also within each social space and courtyard.

Why steel was used

The balconies were the most important design principle from the initial concept development of this building. The balconies were expected to consist of a material allowing a shiny, bright and colourful appearance. A wide range of design options were used in order to explore different materials and different construction details. This resulted in meaningless efforts due to a higher cost than budget allowance. The quantity surveyor suggested the balconies to be constructed of brick and plaster which would result in a more affordable option. It was at that point that the architects investigated laser cut mild steel that enabled the balconies to not only have the desired appearance but also fit within the presented budget. 

These boxes were designed and drawn as a flat surface laser cut panel cut from 2mm mild steel, bent and welded to the final design.

The balconies as steel component were carefully considered with regards to the design specifics, strength and as aesthetic component.  Therefore, the final decision was that the balconies were designed as a laser cut ‘folded’ box latching on to the concrete slabs provided, keeping exposed fixings to a minimum.

A sandbag test was carried out in order to ensure the strength of these balconies.

These steel boxes were fabricated off site and erected on site from the top level down. A base colour was applied as these boxes arrived on site and the final coat was only applied when the boxes were in place on the façade. This was done in order to ensure that 33 colours were applied correctly to 546 balconies.

How this project demonstrates the benefits of steel as a material

Steel can easily be classified as an extremely bold structural material and finish used to envelope vast floor areas. This project is a complete virtual presentation that steel can be used as an excellent aesthetic material especially applied in separate quantities. The only way the architects were able to accomplish the desired design was through the use of steel.

Not only was steel an important element on the exterior of the building it was also used as important design principle in the interior of the building. All sanitary fittings were custom designed in mild steel and supplied by KINK Design and all furniture were designed by KDS Architects and supplied by Dokter and Misses in mild steel and Birch Ply Wood. This provided steel ‘accessories’ for 552 units.

How the project team worked together

Due to the size of the project it was imperative that the entire project team was involved from the inception of the building. Communication between the entire professional team was important in order to ensure that the final design reflects what was intended at the concept phase of the building.

Conclusion

This project is a representation that steel is an extremely flexible material that enables all designers to express themselves freely, in this case from façade design elements to finer interior design. Although the primary mass of this building is constructed of a concrete framework the aesthetic key component was only possible through the use of steel. The steel boxes provided the identity of the building through enabling colour, shadows and overall articulation.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project
Street Address
Town
Province
1118 Park Street,
Hatfield, Pretoria,
Gauteng
Google Maps link https://goo.gl/maps/4ybvayzVjE9eLZPX6
STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork Safe to say with PC date as below
Completion date of full project Practical Completion date: 31 October 2019
Tonnage and steel profiles used 32.76 tonne; Laser cut flat sheet
Project Team Role Company
Nominator Krige Design Studio Architecs
Client/ Developer Eris Property Group & WBHO
Architect Krige Design Studio Architects
Structural Engineer Aurecon
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor IBP Central Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager IBP Central Construction Project Managers
Main Contractor Rhodes
Steelwork Contractor LaserFab
Steel Erector Bailton Steel
Paintwork Contractor Pivot Group
Photographer, Photo competition Papercut Photography
Photographer, Drone footage 255 Architects

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding November 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Prospan 762 and IBR Pro 686
Cladding area coverage 18 672 m²
Cladding tonnage 93.5 Tons

Vamosem Semi Mobile Crushing Plant

 

The project entailed the fabrication of complete mobile crushing plant for a mine in Mozambique

Reason why steel (hot rolled/ lightweight/ tubular/ cellular/ Platework) was chosen:

Steel/Platework was chosen as the material of construction due to the industrial nature of the project.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/plate work/cladding in this project?

This SMC plant was detailed, fabricated by local South African companies which really showcases the level of experience and expertise that South Africa has.

Green building rating/environmental or sustainability considerations

At Betterect’s fabrication facility in Chamdor Krugersdorp, environmental concerns are kept in the forefront of our minds. All offcuts of steel are collected and recycled.

Special considerations such as the design process, fabrication, transport, and erection

The design of the SMC Plant was undertaken by ThyssenKrupp Germany, however, the detailing of the steelwork/plate work was undertaken by Betterect. The project included the fabrication of over 1 000 parts totaling to close to 950 tons of steelwork, plate work, grating, and hand railing and the pre-assembly thereof.

The fabrication of this steelwork/plate work was extremely labour intensive and required the strictest quality requirements as all welds required 100% non-destructive testing and needed to pass either radiographic or ultrasonic testing. The reason for such high-quality standards was due to the enormous loads/tonnages placed on the steelwork/plate work during operation at the mine in Mozambique.

There were many technical fabrication requirements which included preheating, welding of exotic materials, laser alignment, heavy lifts and more. The steelwork was painted with an industrial three-coat paint specification to withstand the grueling exposure to elements and operational requirements.

The hopper base frame weighed close to 45 tons and required abnormal transport loads to the site, which included police escorts in some area on route to the site due to the size of the equipment.

Challenges and solutions

The large number of loose parts and the uncompromising level of quality were challenges faced on the project.

Satisfaction/ testimony of the client

This was a technically challenging project due to the stringent NDT requirements and the quality level of the fabrication by Betterect was extremely high. Overall, it was a successful project with the equipment currently in operation.

What makes your entry special and different from other entries that may be in your category?

This project was truly a South African Engineering accomplishment and showed the world the capabilities of our fabricators and design houses.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project Street Address
Town
Province
Moatize Coal Mine,
Tete,
Mozambique
Google Maps link  

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 12th December 2019
Completion date of full project 12th December 2019
Tonnage and steel profiles used 920 tons

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Betterect
Client/ Developer ThyssenKrupp Industrial Solutions
Structural Engineer  ThyssenKrupp Industrial Solutions
Steelwork Contractor Betterect
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing
Cladding Contractor Global Roofing
Paintwork Contractor Betterect

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Gateway Shopping Centre

 

Gateway Theatre of Shopping has had a fundamental influence on the boom in the development of Umhlanga Ridge. The primary motivation to undertake this project was to match increasing consumer demands, to respond to a request from global brands for representation in the mall, to act on interest from local brands for additional space and the directive from the Client to revitalize the social and entertainment nodes of the mall.

The expansion introduced leading global brands such as H&M, Starbucks and Hamley’s. A new mall extension was developed to expand existing key brands and an interactive Food Court was designed as the nexus of the entertainment node of Gateway.

Architectural Brief

The brief was to relocate the current existing food and entertainment offerings and to create a spacious and comfortable FEC component, taking advantage of natural light and breath-taking views over the Durban landscape. The design was to respond positively to the need for a central gathering area providing food and entertainment thereby acting as a positive catalyst for new and innovative aesthetics.

From inception, the main architectural elements were envisioned to celebrate steel as the primary aesthetic, to create a cohesive design in perfect synergy with the existing architecture while adding to the character of Gateway with new materials, shapes, colours and forms, merging into a harmonious and elegant new style.

While collaborating with the Structural Engineer, it was identified early in the design phase that the development would need to be a lightweight solution due to load limitations in the existing structure and foundations. The use of steel was expanded to be employed as the primary structure, to ensure the global weight remained within the restrictive parameters.

Structural Framing

The structural framing strategy was twofold. First, the Public spaces were designed around bespoke Architectural steel sections meticulously crafted to be unclad and expressed as the finished aesthetic. Second, retail spaces were constructed around standard steel profiles, externally finished in aluminium sheeting and cladding, aligning to the loading strategy.

The use of leading 3D modelling software, cutting edge structural analysis and fabrication techniques facilitated the intensive collaboration with the Architect, Engineers and Fabricators to create each bespoke element, resolve any clashes and produce a fully coordinated, finalised design before any steel was procured for construction.

Using Autodesk and Tekla 3D modelling and design software, compiled with CNC steel fabrication, the team was able to effectively resolve and fabricate all the bespoke and standard steel elements with a high level of precision and accuracy.

The use of these methods was carried through to informing the construction strategies employed, which achieved significant time and cost savings and further empowered the Architects to explore and achieve a complex and high level of architecture.

Due to the complex geometries in the design and critical tolerances required, large portions of the steel structure had to be fabricated and assembled off-site in controlled facilities.

The erection process was extremely challenging and complex for these elements. As the finished aesthetic, a high level of accuracy had to be maintained throughout, which necessitated exceptional coordination and innovative techniques to achieve.

In some instances, the erection process was further complicated by having to hoist the elements up to heights exceeding 30 meters with the use of lightweight cranes, specified due to load restrictions of the structure.

Cladding

The cladding materials selected for this project were Kliptite in mill finish aluminium, which was selected due to its corrosion resistance, wind upliftment negating design and alignment with the Architectural aesthetic. Hulabond aluminium cladding in metallic finishes was selected to compliment the Kliptite sheeting.

The aluminium sheeting was concealed-fixed to the sweeping rooftops which were designed as three intersecting curved planes, set along three axis. Each was connected by inversely raking facades of aluminium sheeting and Hulabond cladding. Several areas of the curved cladding were fixed at a height exceeding 30 meters off the ground level.

How does this project demonstrate the benefits of steel?

This project demonstrates the ability to utilise steel as not just a structural material to be clad or hidden away, but also as the primary aesthetic feature in any form of Architecture. Through innovative design and collaboration with the Engineers, a striking piece of Architecture can be achieved that is both aesthetic and structural in nature, existing in perfect symbiosis with each other.

This allows a high level of design to be explored, whether intricate or elegant, but always one that pushes the boundaries of Architecture, structural and steel design. To quote Arthur C Clarke, “The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond them into the impossible”.

The inclusion of Starbucks into Gateway necessitated a unique aesthetic solution and was designed by the Architects to become a new feature of Gateways iconic main entrance.

The external façade of Starbucks was envisioned as a 41-meter-long “floating” glass curve, arching behind the main entrance columns and converging with the existing curtain wall with no visible supporting structure.

This was achieved using two bespoke curved steel polygonal sections, designed as the finished aesthetic to create an elegantly slender support for the 250m2 sheer glass curtain wall, the steel Bondek floor slab and the steel roof structure.

The Palm Court was created with tensile structures running parallel along the restaurant line and connecting to the Starbucks structure. The tensile membranes were connected to a bespoke steel tube support structure comprising of feature posts and “hidden” back bracing. The posts were formed of 200mm diameter steel sections measuring at 8.6 meters high with closed curve bevel tipped ends.

The Architectural steel of the Food Court was designed as a curved and raking ribbed structure, fashioned to form a slender refined profile. Unclad and expressed as the finished aesthetic, the steelwork arrangement created a seamless connection with the external environment, allowing an abundant influx of natural light into the space.

The main vaulted roof was constructed from bespoke steel curved rafters, braced with raking “tree” members, all fashioned from trapezoid profiles. These supported the primary longitudinal sections which connected to a double curvature, curtain wall head beam, supporting a 78 meter wide, 630m2 curved glass curtain wall.

The roof structure included an expansive skylight measuring 192m2, formed from the longitudinal sections and curved trapezoid rafters.

The Food Court featured the largest suspended glass floor ever constructed in a shopping centre in South Africa, measuring 56m2. The “floating” glass floor was constructed from steel box sections fixed to an 820x500mm steel curved edge beam with an unsupported span of 20 meters.

The Food Pods were debuted in this development. These were new concept interactive eateries unique to Gateway Theatre of Shopping. The Food Pods featured “floating” helical aluminium spiral elements, draped over stainless-steel extractor ducts, designed to cascade from the steel roof structure.

The Food Court featured a 240m2, kaleidoscopic façade cladding, designed from geometrically placed triangular teak panels, supported by an intricate steel subframe, all set at individual unique angles. Due to the highly complex geometries involved, this could only be realized through the use of 3D modelling software.

The external area featured a bespoke, steel supported tensile structure and a 2-meter wide point-fixed cantilever walkway. Leading to a bridge spanning 20 meters, it surrounded and crossed a feature sunken garden. These elements were all designed from bespoke steel sections clad in composite timber decking.

How the project team worked together

The project team worked extremely well and successfully together. This was primarily due to the extensive use of cutting edge software solutions and significant, coordinated collaboration with the fabricators and Contractors, from project initiation and throughout the design and construction process.

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 

Physical address of the project 

Street Address Town 

Province 

1 Palm Boulevard Umhlanga Rocks Durban 

Kzn 

Google Maps link 

https://goo.gl/maps/NSUd77c4pp58uZnW8 

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 

Completion date of steelwork 

01.02.2019 

Completion date of full project 

01.03.2019 

Tonnage and steel profiles used 

Tonnage not available, bespoke profiles used as well as standard profiles 

 

PROJECT TEAM:

Nominator

Impendulo Design Architects (Pty) Ltd

Client/ Developer

Old Mutual Properties

Architect

Impendulo Design Architects (Pty) Ltd

Structural Engineer

Tobell Stretch and Associates

Engineer

Tobell Stretch and Associates

Quantity Surveyor

AECOM

Project Manager

Profica

Main Contractor

WBHO

Steelwork Contractor Primary

Avellini Bros

Steel Erector Primary

Avellini Bros

Steelwork Contractor Tensile

Mtt Structures

Steel Erector Tensile

Mtt Structures

Cladding Manufacturer Sheeting

Global Roofing Solutions

Cladding Supplier Sheeting

Global Roofing Solutions

Cladding Contractor Sheeting

Impact Engineering

Cladding Manufacturer Panels

Façade Solutions

Cladding Supplier Panels

Façade Solutions

Cladding Contractor Panels

Façade Solutions

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

House Skosana

When it comes to the look and feel of a house, the owner is mainly interested in one thing. Having his/her home delivered as per the architect’s vision. This expectation can make the work of the engineer difficult, particularly as the engineer has to specify structural supports that satisfy complex architectural specifications.

Traditional structural elements are primarily designed to satisfy structural performance and low cost criteria. Therefore, it is challenging for modern engineers to meet architectural expectations, of say light and airy buildings, without subjecting the owner to great expense.

Having appreciated this challenge, we at Aura Entle asked ourselves why cost-effective structural solutions are not being developed to complement modern architecture, instead of structural elements being the cause of contention between engineers and architects. We found the answer in the Fluted Floor System (FFS) and more specifically, the novel product that we call the FFS Main Beam (FFS – MB), which was our innovation in the last year.

Mr Skosana, of Willow Acres Pretoria had a 7,0m long span where load bearing brick walls would typically sit to support the slab. Here, typical engineering practice would have had few options but to specify a hefty beam jutting out below the soffit, extending across the entire length of the opening – a costly compromise of the architectural vision of the high end home. Fortunately, that was a compromise that did not have to be made, thanks to Aura Entle and the FFS-MB.

Unlike other flat slab solutions the Fluted Floor System is self-supporting during construction without a need for props, formwork or cranes. It is a floor system with components that can be manually lifted and always fit within the body of the slab – without the need for visible beams – even when spanning over long openings on all the edges of the slab. Therefore the FFS was the perfect floor for the Pretoria designed home.

Over and above the impressive combined structural and aesthetic features lent by the FFS, the floor system offered high comfort through its superior built in insulation pockets that help isolate noise, providing a high degree of privacy between bedrooms above and public spaces below.

For the team at Aura Entle developing the FFS is further testament to how steel is the answer to the evolving desires that architects and clients alike seek for their projects.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 20/08/2018
Completion date of full project 06/11/2018
Tons of structural steel used 2.454
Structural profiles used Fluted Floor System
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Aura Entle
Client/ Developer RS Skosana
Structural Engineer Arrow Point
Main Contractor GTP Holdings
Steelwork Contractor Aura Entle
Steel Erector Aura Entle