SA Airlink

SA Airlink is an international flight training facility for pilots that airline Airlink created in conjunction with Brazilian Aircraft Manufacturer, Embraer. Embraer has brought in full flight simulators to train international pilots on their aircrafts at the facility.

The brief to the architect was to design an internationally rated flight training facility that could compete with similar training centres across the globe. The architect was sent to other international training facilities to obtain information about what world-class training centres offered pilots and their goal was to design a flagship facility that could be marketed to international companies and pilots. The flight training facility had to include practical training areas, class rooms, full flight simulator facilities, a new departure lounge for SA Airlink’s flight operations as well as a heavy maintenance facility where maintenance on aircrafts could be done.

Certain parts of the training facility were envisaged in steel from the start. The architect’s inspiration for the facility’s design was aircraft fuser lodges, which led to a design that included unique, curving shapes of the building. The shapes and cladding wouldn’t have been achieved without the use of steel.

The simulator bay of SA Airlink has curved I beams. The design team tried to roll the six sections but rolling led to buckling. To overcome this challenge, the contractor bended and welded the beams together to obtain the desired curved shapes.

The office sections of the facility have very high shopfronts. To frame these areas, the team installed 254 columns with beams, which contributed to the modern, industrial look and feel that the architect wanted to achieve. There are also two hollow tube columns with expertly designed knuckle joints at the front of the building that simulates aircraft landing gear.

A lot of consideration was paid to the insulation of the building. Being situated next to one of the runways, the design team had to achieve a certain decibel rating to ensure a good acoustic environment for trainers and pilots. The isoboard was installed before the cladding.

Another challenge related to the cladding process was to minimise the clashing of services during installation. Due to the curved shape of the building, the cladding had to be rolled to a specific profile that had two different radius cranks, one of which is quite sharp.

The fabricators, engineer, contactors and steel contractors worked closely with the architects from the start. There were many services that had to go into the facility – including specific air conditioning ducts and mechanical elements – and coordinating the project execution required a team effort. The result is a world class facility to train pilots with state of the art equipment.

Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite & Corrigated
Cladding area/ coverage 1425m2
Cladding tonnage 8 Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Comair
Architect Skylan Architectecture and Design Studio

 

Structural Engineer P Design CC

 

Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Quanticost Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Belo & Kies Construction (Pty) Ltd

 

Steelwork Contractor Pretorius Staalwerke
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Roofing Guarantee (Cladco completed this project)
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Radisson Hotel at Silo 6

The Radisson Red hotel located in Silo 6 has art, music and fashion at its core. It is an upmarket hotel that caters to business travellers, international travellers and families. This 252-room Hotel, recently completed, is the first in South Africa of a new offering by the Radisson Group. The vibrant 4-star brand, Radisson Red, caters for a younger, trendier segment of the tourist market.

Situated immediately adjacent to the precinct’s Centrepiece, MOCAA (museum of Contemporary African Art), this project occupies a critical position. With MOCAA as the focus, and the existing BOE building on the opposite side, Silo 6 was designed to complement this composition of three buildings.

Conceptually, the building is a ‘wall’ building that defines the outer edge of the precinct and in mirroring the scale of the BOE building, showcases MOCAA as the focal point. Architecturally, the wall concept is expressed literally through the creative use of rendered brick construction on the East and West facades while the North and South facades reflect the Dockland’s industrial heritage using Steel and Glass.

The punctured fenestration on the East and West facades reflects the rational floor layout of rooms and is expressed using a custom designed protruding Aluminium frame. Juxtaposed against the rough brickwork, this device is a key contemporary insertion in the architectural expression of the building. The building has been awarded a 5-star Green Building status.

The project site had an existing super basement that was designed to accommodate a generic building on top of it. During the time when the basement was constructed, the client (V&A Waterfront) wasn’t 100% sure whether the building would be a hotel. The Rezidor Hotel Group/ Raddison Red later become the operator of the Radisson Red Hotel at Silo 6.

The Radisson Group has their own design requirements for creating a hotel and the brief to the architects was to adhere to their standards and to create a hotel that would maximise the number of rooms as well as fit into the Silo District, which has become a landmark in South Africa’s Mother City.

To create a commercially viable hotel, stay within the brand standards and requirements, and maximise keys of the third Radisson Red hotel in the world, the design team had to think out of the box. Not only did they have to respond to an existing structural grid that didn’t relate to a hotel configuration, but they also had to carefully consider how the north façade of the hotel would complement the Silo 6 district.

The structural gymnastics that the team employed included introducing V-columns to create a layout that would accommodate a hotel, and the north façade of the hotel included interesting steel solutions and careful placement of cladding pannels to create a playful ‘random’ rhythm within the framework.

There is a concrete frame structure with steel elements clipped onto the façade. The north façade is articulated with balustrading and channels that are fixed to the concrete structure with steel. The façade articulation speaks to the notion of an industrial area, which is appropriate for the context of the Silo 6 precinct which includes a working shipyard, a museum and other landmark buildings.

 The design team fixed vertical flat plates to the concrete frame structure in a series of angles to frame the balustrade modules. The beta fence panels (fencing panels) were then fixed to tubular sections. The concrete slab was then finished a C-channel that is fixed to the concrete edges, which created a unique and beautiful façade articulation. Red cladded panels create privacy for guests on their balcony. Bright red was an aesthetically pleasing way to introduce colour into the north façade while speaking to the operator’s brand, and created a seemingly random pattern on the façade.

One of the challenges that the design team encountered was a manufacturing error that led to an incorrectly sized balustrade height. The calculation error led to the design team having to adjust the design to avoid remanufacturing of the balustrade modular panels.

 The architects inherited a restrictive structural grid which informed a very constrained north suite façade configuration and the design team was tasked with articulating the north façade to create a playful ‘random’ rhythm in the framework. The balcony spaces vary in size due to the staggering of the red panels, which creates a beautiful façade.

 The challenge of the manufacture height was successfully overcome by the design team and the contractor working hand in hand to deliver the project on time and within budget. The team were able to collaborate to look at ways to achieve the desired results by modifying the fixing detail.

Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite & IBR
Cladding area/ coverage 270m2
Cladding tonnage 1,4 tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Not provided by nominator
Architect Peerutin + Design Space Africa
Structural Engineer Arup South Africa
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor MLC Cape Town
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Pepkor Warehouse

The purpose of the Pepkor Warehouse in Hammarsdale is to serve as a distribution centre for the Pepkor group. The distribution centre consists of the following aspects:

  • Total of 80 000m2 of covered warehouse space (180m wide and 440m long).
  • Main Ackermans office and a main Speciality office with 3000m2 and 1800m2 respectively.
  • A total of 4 node offices of 500m2 each.

The brief to the architect and the team for the structural portion of the project was the following:

  • Warehouse to be ±55,000m² for Ackermans and ±25,000m² for Pepkor Speciality in one building as per the Layout Plan.
  • Approximately 17.35m clear height to underside of eaves.
  • Reinforced concrete and structural steel all to Structural Engineer’s design incorporating appropriate corrosion protection where necessary.
  • Internal column spacing will based on a 33.2m x 30.5m grid (4 doors @ 8.3m centres = 33.2m).
  • The structure steel will be strengthened locally to allow for the installation of solar panels to a roof area of approximately 15,000m².

The warehouse was always envisaged to be constructed mainly out of structural steel. The main support columns of the warehouse were designed and constructed out of concrete up to 12.6m and 17m from FFL. The remainder of the structure was constructed out of structural steel.

The structural system used for the building was based on a girder truss system carrying lateral trusses that makes up the main elements of the roof. Various steel profiles were used for the building from hot rolled I-Beams, Angle irons, Circular hollow sections, cold rolled lipped channels and so forth.

The remarkable aspects of this project were the speed at which the steelwork was erected as well as the completion of the overall project. A total of 2500 ton of structural steel was erected (Main warehouse 2180 tons and canopies / offices 320 tons = 2 500 tons), with the erection commencing on 14 November 2017, and reaching completion of the main warehouse structure (2180 Ton) at the end of March 2017 (which includes a builder’s break). This remarkable achievement was achieved over a period of 90 working days to erect on average of 24 tons per day over a period of 4,5 months, using on average 8 cranes on site over the same period.

A sensitive construction program had the steel contractor under pressure from 19 August 2016 which was the date of appointment. Cadcon Steel Construction decided to enter in a joint venture with A. Leita Steel construction to reach the delivery various dates for erection. The on-site production required to meet the construction program resulted in an average of 485 ton of structural steelwork to be erected per month.

The entire project team worked together successfully throughout the entire duration of the project. Effort was made to design the structure in a manner that suits the various contractors involved at each step of the project to reach the various project milestones.

Tons of structural steel used 2 500 tons
Structural profiles used Hot rolled I-, H-, Angle section, Cold Rolled Lipped channels

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator EDS Engineering Design Services (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Rokwil Property Development
Architect T C Design Architects
Structural Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services (Pty) Ltd
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor MHS Consulting Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Dave Armstrong
Main Contractor Abbeydale Building and Civils (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon Steel Construction and Engineering
Steel Erector Fanie Leibrandt Steel Erectors
Cladding Manufacturer Macsteel Service Centres (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Macsteel Service Centres and Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Dram Industrial Coating
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Abbeydale Building and Civils (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images  

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Momsen’s Bikes/ Two wheels trading

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The restoration and re-purposing of the historical South End ‘Row Houses’ is to house the new Momsen and Two Wheels Trading head office.  Momsen is the leading mountain bike brand in South Africa and wished to be housed back within the ‘Baakens Valley’ where it all began for them as a brand. The existing ‘Row Houses’ would service the office and retail components with a new warehouse building the rear, serving as the distribution and bulk storage component.

What was the brief to the architect?

The building owner required a design that would retain the essence and rhythm of the historical elements that faced the street.  This needed to inform the design and massing of the warehouse and retail components.  It was important to satisfy all Heritage requirements, yet at the same time create a building that, planning wise, would best serve the tenant, i.e Momsen Bikes and Two Wheels Trading.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes.  The warehouse form and need for free span could only be done best in steel.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The warehouse was broken down into 4 pitched sections to that drew inspiration from the adjacent 4 dominant Row Houses. The warehouse, however, was orientated perpendicular to this so as not to overpower the smaller houses along the street. The warehouse’s main portal structure is formed using I-beam and columns of varying sizes.  Lipped channels then span the portal frame bays.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The structural frame was clad in Saflok sheeting both for the roof and vertical side walling.  The 4 pitches that form the warehouse, although of the same height, varied in depth that further broke the scale of the building down. This posed complexities where the vertical cladding elements as the sheeting needed to seamlessly travel down from the roof into the wall, yet allow for neat flashing and valley gutter detailing.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The only challenge was to translate our Architectural ideas to both the Contractor and Engineer.  Although the warehouse is fairly simple in terms of fabrication it was crucial, through the use of 3D’s, to make sure the contractor and engineer understood the detail between steelwork and cladding elements.  Many additional items, such as cleats, hanging brackets and the like were introduced specifically to allow for easy and interpretation of the cladding which would form the overall aesthetic of the building.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding
in this project?

For DMV Architecture the seed idea was simple. The rhythm of the ‘four’ Row Houses were replicated within the ‘four’ apposing warehouse forms.  These were intentionally a play-off on the number and rhythm of the four houses, yet were positioned perpendicular to them.  It was our opinion that if placed in the same line of the house gables, the warehouse would dominate the residential scale. In placing them juxtaposed, it helped create each owns identity and purpose.  Further to this, the original Row Houses, which terminated in gable ends as part of their vernacular routes, were again juxtaposed and the warehouse adopted a roof that would precede the gable ends opposite to that of the vernacular.  In doing so each one’s identity complimented the other and reinforced their unity.

To the West, the warehouse as a gesture is set back from the boundary to allow the full extent of the first Row House to stand proud as one approaches the building down Upper Valley Road.  This first house retains its original identity by keeping the lean-to to the rear (full extent of original house) and direct access off the street with steps and inter-leading balcony.  With security being an issue within the valley the client naturally wished that no other house is accessed off the street and that the steps be removed so as to reduce the risk of break-ins.  The existing internal floor level is raised from the natural ground level externally so it made sense for the steps to not allow intruders the ability to view inside the new office space.  It was fundamental though to retain the memory of the original steps and main entry to the houses.  It was decided to therefore re-introduce the steps by making use of a thickened plaster to mimic their form in the same plane as the buildings plinth.  The original entry to the balconies were also enclosed but painted, together with the ‘steps’ in a deep grey to further highlight this memory.  To the East the showroom, which too was once an original house, yet detached and not as significant as the Row Houses, was remodelled to take on the same footprint yet in a sheeted contemporary manner with the showrooms framed shop fronts linking back to the houses.  The vertical sheeting also was a play off on the tin sheet cladding of the original.  The gap between the original detached house and fourth Row House was naturally an axis upon which to slide into upon entry and helped establish a break between the internal functioning of the new development, that being office to the Row Houses and Showroom to the detached house.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

For us communication is key. The use of 3D information provided to all role players helped ease the communication flow and reduction in errors and or time delays on site.

Tons of structural steel used 38.6 tons
Structural profiles used I-Beams/Lipped Channels
Cladding profile/ type used Saflok + Corrugated
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Saflok 1309m2 | Corrugated 350m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Gary Erasmus Trust
Architect Dmv Architecture
Structural Engineer Poise Consulting Engineers
Engineer Poise Consulting Engineers
Quantity Surveyor N/A
Project Manager Dmv Architecture
Main Contractor Dave Collins Construction
Steelwork Contractor Uitenhage Super Steel
Steel Erector Uitenhage Super Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Ceiling Master
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Sl Photography
Photographer, Other submitted images Sl Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mercedes Benz J-site Logistics Building

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

In order to reconfigure its processing operations for a new model, Mercedes Benz South Africa (MBSA) is looking to upgrade part of its facility based in East London. One of the upgrade works involves the construction of a new logistics building on J-Site within the East London plant. This project involves the construction of amongst other structures, the following:-

  1. a) J site Logistics building,
  2. b) Gate House to replace the existing
  3. c) Hawker Stalls to replace the existing
  4. d) Dry Link connection between the J Site building and the existing F11 Assembly building
  5. e) Truck Canopy

The client opted for a turnkey contract solution for the project and Stefanutti Stocks were appointed on February 2017.  AECOM were appointed by Stefanutti Stocks as their design consultants.

What was the brief to the architect?

The client’s aimed to construct a new Logistics Building with good accessibility for suppliers and a good connection to Assembly to feed the manufacturing process, with the building footprint maximising all available space on the site. The turnkey contractor was to propose energy saving initiatives which needed to be incorporated into the design.  The principal design philosophy is to provide a structural support arrangement which provides a robust and sustainable structural solution, ensuring the space provided is suitable for its intended use.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The Logistics building is approximately 21 000m2. A gridline system of 28m in the East-West direction and 15m in the North-South direction is used. The Logistics building has a structural steel roof with a slope of 2% (1.2 degree pitch).  Hot rolled IPE purlins are spaced at 3.0m and span 7.5m between the trusses. The trusses span 28m and are supported on girders spanning 15m. The trusses and girders are 2.2m deep and consist of UC’s for the top and bottom cords and double angles for diagonals. A clear height of 10m is allowed for between the floor and underside of the roof trusses. All services are therefore located within the roof cavity. To maximise the usable floor area and ensure flexibility for racking layouts, no vertical bracing was used.  This also ensured that expansion of the building could take place in all directions.  To obtain lateral stability, the concrete columns were used up to 8m above floor level and catladders with a perimeter parapet were provided for maintenance.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The exterior of the new building is largely an aluminium cassette facade to avoid corrosion, with corresponding insulation.  The roof is constructed with 2 layers mineral torch-on plastomeric waterproofing membrane that is each 4.5mm thick on 60mm fibre rock wool insulation board. The board is fixed to Safintra Saflok 700 0,8mm thick steel AZ 150 (inverted) sheets, which are in turn fixed to the purlins.  The non-standard 0,8mm steel Saflok sheet was rolled and load tested at the Safintra premises in Pinetown.  This was required due to both the load and spans being beyond the product catalogue guidelines, as well as the sheeting used in an inverted position to provide almost continuous support to the insulation board.  A complete mock-up of the roof system was built at Safintra’s premises for testing purposes as well as on site for the client’s approval.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Little in the way of fabrication and erection challenges were encountered due to the fact that the concept design involved all parties – steelwork contractor, shop drawing detailer and the steel erection team.  Available sections, lead times, splice positions and section lengths, transport and erection were all discussed and agreed on before final design commenced.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The roof design loads on the Logistics Building include future PV cell installation, the self-weight of the built-up roofing system, technical services and conveyor loading.  This loading is far in excess of the average industrial building loading, resulting in a potentially heavier overall structure. Savings on the steel tonnage was however made by breaking away from the norm in utilising hot-rolled purlins, designing out the requirement for sag bars, and truss and girder connections were fashioned to eliminate the need for gusset plates.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All design and contracting disciplines on the project worked within an integrated 3D environment. With the ability to interrogate models virtually before breaking ground on-site led to significantly less RFI’s and reduced critical clashes on-site when compared to traditional 2D based project workflows. Consultants generally create design intent models up to about an LODev (Level of Development) 300, on the J-Site Project we were able to run clash detection bi-weekly against the design Revit models using a combination of Autodesk BIM 360 Glue and Autodesk Navisworks software. The once fabrication models were completed by the steel fabricator in Tekla software, we were able to do our final clash detection checks against with models up to LODev 500. At this year’s Daimler Supplier Awards, which recognises Daimler’s suppliers for outstanding performance, Stefanutti Stocks Pty Ltd was recognised for its excellence in the Partnership Category for the Mercedes-Benz Logistics Warehouse and Gate Complex. This is a reflection of the collaboration on the project between all parties.

Tons of structural steel used ±818 tons including Truck Canopy
Structural profiles used Hot rolled open sections, cold formed lipped channels
Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Tufdek Aluminium Cladding, Safintra Saflok 700 steel decking (0,8mm thick) inverted roof sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 23 500m²    35tons (Roof), 8 700m²    155 tons (Side)

This project overview, motivation and technical information was provided by the project nominator. If you were a part of this project and notice that information is incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.


Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AECOM
Client/ Developer Mercedes-Benz South Africa
Architect AECOM
Structural Engineer AECOM
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Stefanutti Stocks
Project Manager AECOM
Main Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Insimbi Coatings
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

City Logistics Ceiling

Purpose of the structure/project?

The structure was designed and installed as a ceiling to bring the existing facility into spec as a functioning ESFR (Early Suppression Fast Response) warehouse. Due to the new tenant’s requirements to store tyres, the ESFR system requires the sprinklers at a precise height above the stored product, and consequently a ceiling within a specified ASIB range thereafter to optimise early warning parameters from smoke and heat.

Due to the underside of sheet being too high in approximately 8,800sqm of the warehouse, and the existing steelwork not being able to cope with the new sprinkler loads, the only option was to strengthen the existing steelwork insitu and thereafter provide a ceiling at the required height.

What was the brief to the architect?

To get the existing facility, recently vacated by the Mr Price group into spec for the new tenant, Goodyear.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in the end?

Not necessarily. There were investigations into using traditional ceiling boards and droppers. It was deemed due to the sprinkler weight that truss and girder strengthening was required in either regard, and the subsequent steel roof would be lighter and quicker. The entire project was on a compact and tricky program with significant pressure from the tenant for occupation dates.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used and why?

Hot-rolled: Angles, tubes, and plate.
Cold-rolled: 300mm purlin section and 302 Metsec Z-sections

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation)

All structural steel and cladding was retrofitted to the existing (strengthening) and new (ceiling) steelwork from inside the warehouse, off cherry pickers and scissor lifts. Due to the installation limitations and material handling the sheets were delivered in 4m lengths, as before, all off scissor lifts. Cladding had to span across 78m, in-between sprinkler droppers, lights, electrical cable trays, and at times in-between the existing lattice trusses.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication from the engineer’s design. Tell more about fabrication and erection process if difficult, complex, innovative

Large steel plates to carry the Metsec sections were cumbersome and difficult to install. Wind bracing and box sections (made from 300mm purlins) were installed above the existing truss beneath the existing roof. These were 11.2m in length and had to be lifted off access machines to over 13m and installed in highly restrictive conditions.

What is special/unusual/innovative/aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The steelwork was used to both strengthen the existing structure and provide a solution to the client/tenant’s need to successfully achieve the desired result and make this facility unique and superior to both parties.

How did the project team work together (contractor involved early, challenges, ease of communication)

Excellent. With numerous contractors on site working weekends, night shifts, and in confined areas the project team worked exceptionally well under improbable timelines.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Tons of structural steel used 110 tonnes
Structural profiles used Z – Sections, Angles, Plates
CLADDING
Cladding profile/ type used 0.50 IBR 686 Zincal AZ150
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 8800m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Cousins Steel International
Client/ Developer City Logistics
Architect RHA
Structural Engineer Sotiralis Consulting Engineering
Engineer Cousins Steel International
Quantity Surveyor Quantil
Project Manager Quantil
Main Contractor Cousins Steel International
Steelwork Contractor Cousins Steel International
Steel Erector Cousins Steel International
Cladding Manufacturer SAFAL
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA
Cladding Contractor Cousins Steel International
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Cousins Steel International
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Cousins Steel International
Photographer, Photo competition Cousins Steel International

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hoopstad WestFert Fertilizers

Fertilizer company Westfert required a massive warehouse to take advantage of favourable global conditions in the market. The large-scale dome in Hoopstad that was built is described as the biggest in the southern hemisphere. The main objective of the structure was to create an inland fertilizer storage facility where various basic granular fertilizers can be blended and bagged for the specific needs of farmers. The structure is 116 meters wide and 152.25 meters in length and covers approximately two hectares.

There are no supporting pillars within the structure, which creates enough space for two Airbus 380s to fit inside the building. A triangular pipe frame structure was use for the trusses. A single 194mm diameter bottom cord pipe and two 140mm diameter pipes were used as top sections. The bracing is 76mm pipe and all the sections are 3mm thick.

Creating a structure of this scale wasn’t without its challenges, says project engineer Hentie Park. One of the main challenges was to ensure that all the trusses were rolled on a 96m radius. Secondly, all the welded connections were profiled with a CNC plasma cutter to ensure exact fit. Each truss consisted of 10 sections that were joined by specialised welding on site. Articulating joints were designed where the truss connected to the concrete plinth. Two halves of the trusses were lifted by two 25ton cranes and the centres were connected with three pins – one for each cord. The latter reduced the election time and costs significantly.

 The unsupported span of this building is 116m. Global Roofing Solutions supplied approximately +-27000m2 of Klip-Tite and NuRib for the product and 127m long sheets were rolled on site and clipped into positionThe dome is the fourth largest such structure in the world and it will be able to house approximately 200 000 tons of fertilizer.  Thanks to the new dome warehouse, Westfert will now be able to buy input ingredients such as urea in bulk when exchange rates and prices are at their most favourable.

Cladding profile/ type used KlipTite & NuRib
Cladding area/ coverage +-27000m2
Cladding tonnage +-160 Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer West Fertilizers
Structural Engineer Alliance Con Systems
Project Manager Alliance Con Systems
Main Contractor Alliance Conveying Systems
Steelwork Contractor Vic Engineering
Steel Erector Vic Engineering
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Alliance Conveying Systems

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Sun International Time Square Main Arena

The Sun Arena at Time Square in Menlyn Maine is the biggest live entertainment venue in Pretoria. The purpose of the arena is to create an events and performance space where some of the biggest music concerts in South Africa will be held.

The multi-faceted brief to the architect was to create a performance venue that could seat 8 500 people and could be adapted to accommodate 1300 banquet guests and up to 18000 delegates in a school room format. The client wanted a continuous roofspan without any columns and the arena had to incorporate all of bells and whistles that would make it an arena of international standard. The fly tower height of the arena, which is the framing around the stage, is of international standard which means that many international performers will be able to perform at the Sun Arena.

The project wasn’t envisaged in steel from the start. The columns on which the edged gutter and roof wedges sit were originally conceived in concrete, but due to steel offering faster construction times, this was later changed to steel. The roof structure, which is a tubular truss frame roof, plus a large gutter were done in steel. The gutter of the roof has a steel construction tension ring and there is a compression ring in the centre of the roof trusses.

The design team had to create an acoustic sandwich out of the cladding because the performance arena had to be insulated from noise from traffic and weather, and it also had to prevent interference from the concert to neighbouring facilities. The cladding also had to be watertight so that the arena would be kept dry during bad weather. Global Roofing Solutions supplied 86 tonnes of cladding to cover the 1300m2 cladding area for the project. The company’s widely popular KlipTite system was specified for the project.

The geometry of the cladding of the Sun Arena is particularly interesting because the roof was designed as a series of wedges. A curved gutter edge, however, meant that when an edge intersected with a curve, it would lead to a varying height at the bottom. During the project, the team had to resolve how they were going to marry the varying heights at the bottom of the cladding that resulted from the combination of curved gutter edges and roof wedges.

The roof has a 96m, column-free span, which is unusually large. While there are many long span roofs in warehousing projects, the unique acoustic envelope that the team had to create makes it an exceptional project.

The entire project team worked together from the start to conceive the structure and decide on the appropriate materials for the arena. The main contractor was involved in all stages of the project so that the goal of creating an economic, structurally efficient and aesthetically pleasing structure could be achieved. The team also worked in a 3D modelling program called REVIT, which led to digital design-led decision making and information sharing.

The external box gutter of the Arena was originally planned in concrete, however looking at the complexity of building scaffolding, supporting of a concrete gutter and fixing re-bar at > 15m high levels and weight limitations, as well as programme, it was decided to re-design the concrete gutter to a steel lattice curved box gutter approx. 4m high, with internal 3mm plate, formed gutter, These items were fabricated as complete units from column to column and lifted into position using a 220-ton crane. Rest of the Arena roof the only possible way of spanning 100m was possible with the dome type steer of with compression ring in the centre.

The Design was driven by three elements

  1. a) Client Budget
  2. b) Buildability with site constraints being the construction of 100m roof and seating structure on a complete basement structure as the footprint of the site
  3. c) The programme, with end dates not moving due to events already booked year in advance for the opening

Detailing was done in Tekla, hand-in-hand with the engineers to determine lifting sizes and weights to ensure the steel contractor could erect the steelwork using the most economical plant.

It was important to see the 3D model for details such as sheeting and cladding and to model the lifting procedure and method statement.

Tekla was used to colour in the lifting elements with element weights, which made it clear to the engineer when approving the loads on the slabs and determining the crane positions on the slabs.

Fabrication was done in complete assemblies as far as possible, due to CADCON premises close to site we could transport abnormal loads not having to travel to far on the main highways.

We detailed in Tekla temporary jigging structures to simulate real-life fit positions, with this we could ensure that the assemblies fit with high precision on site.

Complete gutters were, trusses in two sections, back section complete and front section bolted on site, was fabricated.

Trial assembly of all elements in the workshop was done before shipping to site.

A further requirement, all the reinforcement for the main oblong columns were installed in the steel contractor yard and we had to include the weight of the reinforcing in the overall lifting weight of the main columns when doing the crane studies.

Erection was the most critical element. The Steel roof was located on a complete basement three levels down and the main roof had to be erected in just over 3 months excluding sub-structures.

We had to design the elements to be lifted with cranes which the slab could handle from a design point of view.

The process was as follows:

  • Max. Lifting weights were determined for all main assemblies
  • Crane positions were pinned all around the structure taking concrete structures, lift shafts, roadways into consideration
  • Max radius for crane lifts determined, which determined sizes of cranes
  • Back propping of the slabs had to be designed for each and every position
  • Back propping was erected in sequence to synchronize with steel erection programme, we could not back prop the whole basement due to the costs involved.
  • As we erected, the back propping was moved in the same sequence
  • Temporary cabling was used to stabilize elements where the complete structure not yet working as a whole
  • The biggest challenge was to have fabricated elements of this size off-site, bring to sit in sequence and have a civil contractor aligning them 100% with the steelwork methodology and giving their support throughout and all trusses between the gutter and main compression ring fitting perfectly with only a 50mm tolerance gap over a 100m span.

Main Arena, a total of 1375.699 tons and a bolt count of 17 939.

      • An internal diameter of 93.4m
      • External diameter 96.0m
      • Total roof tonnage 570.510 tons
      • Outer tension ring ‘box gutter’ size 2.5m wide x 3.9m deep with segment lengths of 15.5m and oblong steel column ‘hammerhead’ being 2.5m wide x 3.9m deep x 4m in length. Total of 16 segmented sections of 19.4m. Total tonnage 215.216 tons.
      • Internal cylindrical ‘compression’ ring; 7.95m x 5.975m high at 20.469 tons
      • Main arena and staging sub-grids and catwalks/cat ladders at 132.877 tons
      • Main arena plate girders and raking seating support beams with a total of 143.844 tons
      • 16 number of Oblong tube steel / concrete composite columns and tension ring ‘hammerhead’ at 292.783 tons

Mobilisation and erection challenges: While continuing with the main concrete superstructure, structural steel erection had to overlap with the concrete works in order to keep to the very challenging and demanding programme. This entailed back-propping of the newly constructed lower ground concrete floors down to the –B3 level, to allow access for multiple construction laydown zones and mobile cranes in excess of 80 ton, and in some instances 220 ton, to be positioned on the concrete floors for assembly of the compression ring, tubular space frame roof trusses, rigging sub-grids, catwalks, stage mechanics support structure and the placement of the raking steel beam structures to facilitate the final finished bond-dek seating structures.

  • Erection Methodology and Sequence of ARENA Roof and Seating: The steel contractor developed his Erection Methodology and Sequence to suit the main contractors concrete programme, concrete pour sequence, striving for minimum radius of lifting weights, maximum permissible slab loads using the minimum amount of back propping to determine the most economical choice of cranes to lift the Main Roof assemblies.
  • The Main Roof Assemblies included the following heavy lifts to be erected in the most economical way:
  1. 16 No Oblong Columns
  2. 16 No Radial Plate Girders > 1m deep
  3. 32 No Hammer Head Lattice Box Girders
  4. 16 No Radial Box Gutter Girders with 3mm Internal folded Gutter plate
  5. 1 No Central Compression Ring approx. 6m high rigged as one assembly
  6. 16 No Main Trusses spanning over 40m (this was spliced in 1/3 and 2/3 sections due to lifting weights)’

Originally two erection philosophies were considered:

  • Philosophy 1: Erection of all heavy lift assemblies as above being lifted from external lifting positions outside the Arena perimeter with a 600-ton crane.

This option was very costly, for the following reasons:

  1. Standing time in between the heavy lifts whilst waiting for infill steelwork to be installed using two tower cranes before next heavy lift.
  2. Transport logistics involved removing and re-installing mega cranes’ counterweights each time crane repositioned to new lifting position.
  3. Establishment and de-establishment of mega crane.
  • Philosophy 2: Erection of all heavy lift assemblies at a shorter radius from inside the Arena perimeter, but off the concrete slabs.

Advantages of this option:

  1. Majority of lifts were possible using an 80-ton crane
  2. Shorter radius lifts possible due to cranes standing inside Arena perimeter.
  3. Hook time of 80-ton crane vs 600-ton crane is much quicker during lifting operations.
  4. Back propping of the internal Arena slabs was required, which ensured heavier lifts being done using maximum 220-ton crane where 80-ton crane lifting capacity limited.
  5. All 220-ton crane lifts were sequenced as 1st priority, after which back propping could be removed and use of this crane time limited as far as possible.
  6. Infill steelwork was done again using two tower cranes.
  7. Main assemblies were also spliced in such a way to limit lifting weights and temporary props designed to support the assemblies at the spliced positions. i.e. Main trusses spliced as a welded back segment 3rd of truss and front segment 2/3rd as bolted assembly on site.

Erection Philosophy 2 proved to be the most advantageous in terms of cost and time for contractor and client.

Main Challenges – Fabrication and Erection:

Planning had to be done from shop detailing stage, to ensure complete assemblies fit on site and erection weights being considered taking into account the crane/ lifting philosophy followed to limit erection costs and back propping as far as possible.

CADCON designed temporary workshop jigging, which was detailed in X-steel and built to make sure when the complete gutters girders, hammerhead structures and roof trusses built, it would fit x 100% on site.

In essence, the complete roof assemblies built in workshop, and bolted spliced where the assemblies suited best the transport route from Centurion to Menlyn, whilst also considering each assembly maximum lifting weights. Weights were pre-determined in Tekla and indicated on the Erection Methodology, also indicating maximum crane lifting radius.

This ensured that slabs and cranes were not overloaded on slabs where activity were 24/7 with labour and surrounding main contractor plant, tower cranes, etc.

Further challenges:

  1. Oblong columns

The external perimeter columns – “oblong columns” consisted of 1,2m high oblong rolled plate, welded together in segments to form the external plate columns 13m-16m high. The oblong columns were fabricated from 16mm plate and internally fitted with 120 x 60 RHS sections to prop the external face of the columns to ensure all stay aligned when the 16mm plate welded and the heat added. Studs and mesh were welded internally to provide the working of a composite column.

The oblong columns were fitted with rebar internally. The steel contractor fitted with the help of the steel re-bar supplier the reinforcement inside the workshop, to avoid this activity not possible to fix if the oblong columns already erected. From a practical and programme point of view, it made sense to fit the reinforcement in the workshop.

HD- bolts were designed to receive the oblong columns and a cable/prop stay system was also developed and designed by the steel contractor and main contractor to support the oblong columns after erected and the trusses not yet installed.

 It was a requirement that the full circle had to be erected, after which the cable/ prop system would remain in place during the concrete pumping of the oblong columns. To assist the pumping of the oblong columns with concrete, the steel contractor fitted nipples to each Oblong column, which used to pump concrete from bottom up in each oblong column

  1. Compression Ring

The Compression ring was completely built as a bolted assembly standing over 6m tall in the workshop.

After The compression ring pre-assembled x 100%, it was dismantled and sent to site in loose elements.

The compression ring had to be installed x 100% centrally to the Arena and at the correct level to ensure the roof trusses fit. To achieve this, a central scaffold tower was designed by Form Scaff in conjunction with the WSP and the main contractor.

The arena slab receiving the scaffold tower had to be back propped 3 floors down to the lower level surface bed.

At the base of the scaffold tower, sand release jacks were built and positioned under each scaffold prop by CADCON.

Main roof trusses were installed in segments supported from temporary designed columns to limit truss lifting weights and limit crane loadings on the slab.

Once all the trusses were installed in opposite sequence segments and all infill steelwork complete, the scaffold tower had to be lowered. Releasing the scaffold was done by washing the sand from, the sand jacks systematically, after which the roof lowered by approximately 80mm over the 95m spanned roof.

The engineer calculated the roof under full load with sheeting and stage sub-grids, the roof would settle 150mm lower from the compression ring scaffold platform level.

A remarkable achievement of this Arena installation, that it took only 2,5 months to install all roof and infill steelwork after the compression ring was installed and levelled on the central scaffold support tower.

The Overall Arena installation from 1st steelwork being the oblong columns to the release of the compression ring – 19th of October 2016 to 15th of May 2017, approximately 6 months.

After the main roof was released, supported off the compression ring scaffolding platform, the following installations proceeded.

  1. Roof Sheeting
  2. Main sub-grid suspended with hanger system off roof
  3. Lower and upper stages

What made this exceptional, was the teamwork required between the steel contractor, main contractor and engineers which all had to work in harmony, trusting each other views and coming up with the best plans to execute such a complex roof and sub-structures of over 1500 tons in this short period of time, with a client which gave their backing in all circumstances during the process to ensure the end goal achieved to open to the public on time and produce revenue.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Tons of structural steel used Approx. 1 800 tons
Structural profiles used Tubular Steelwork up to 1000mm diameter in roof,  Hot rolled in Sub-grid and Seating

Project Team

Nominator CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer SUN INTERNATIONAL
Architect LYT Architects
Structural Engineer WSP
Quantity Surveyor MLC
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector On Par
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Dram Industrial Coatings

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.

Graskop Gorge Lift Structure

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

To create an exciting and popular tourist stop over point on the Panorama Route at Graskop, Mpumalanga. The gorge has established itself as an adventure destination through the Big Swing, which is a well-known operation, so there had been some “human footprint” in the gorge for a while. The client wanted to expand on the adventure concept and added the lift and interactive walking trail in the rain forest below. The purpose of the structure is to accommodate the glass viewing panoramic lift taking visitors 51m down the face of the Graskop Gorge into the forest below, where wooden walkways and suspension bridges meander along a 600 metre trail through the indigenous forest with interactive exhibits.

What was the brief to the architect?

To design a lift shaft structure to accommodate the panoramic glass viewing lift for the Graskop Gorge Lift Company, as well as the buildings around the panoramic lift at the Graskop Gorge Adventure Centre. The site was chosen adjacent to a structure for informal curio traders and a protruding rock outcrop which had been a viewing point with a small pub. This was the ideal position for the lift shaft. The brief was to incorporate the traders into the adventure tourism complex and upgrade the existing structure. The centre should accommodate the ticketing office, shops of various sizes, a restaurant and general viewing areas for the public. Support services for the centre also had to be included. The servicing of the lift required easy access to the lift motor room. A viewing platform was subsequently added around the lift motor room as an extension to the public deck.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes. Structural Steel was the choice of material for the Lift Shaft Structure from the beginning. Reasons include compatibility with the lift installation, and the open truss-like nature of the shaft structure to simulate the waterfall on the opposite side of the gorge.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The distance from the base to the top of the shaft is 60m, with the total vertical lift travel distance of 51m. The shaft structure was designed as a vertical structure with two top fixing points apart from the fixing at the concrete base. UC 305x305x97 H-profiles were used for the 6 main shaft columns, because adequate l/r ratios were required for 10m segment lengths. Each segment was fully braced using 63,5×3 and 88.9×2,5 Circular hollow sections cross bracing between 203x133x25 UB lateral stiffness beams. 305x165x46 UB profiles were used for the access platform beams at the top of the shaft with 80x80x6 Angles for bracing. UC 152x152x23 profiles were used as knee brace elements to support and fix the top viewing platform to the main shaft structure.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

Cladding formed a minimal part of the Shaft Structure itself, only the top machine room side walls and roof received IBR cladding after the access platform to the machine room was completed.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

A national shortage of 305x305x97 H profiles, required the design to be altered to use 254x254x73 in the top part of the shaft. For the erection of the shaft a 70 tonne crane was planned, but it would require the crane to be too close to the edge of the cliff, and the crane cables were too short to reach the 51m deep bottom.. Instead a 9 tonne Spierings Mobile Tower Crane had to be hired that could lift 2.5 t per lift at a 27m reach, with adequate cable length to reach down to the bottom.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The exquisite setting of the lift shaft structure opposite the Panorama Waterfall forms a truly aesthetic pleasing view from a distance, with the natural waterfall at one side of the gorge and the grey coloured, open truss-like lift shaft structure simulating the waterfall on the opposite side of the gorge, forming a beautiful parallel with each other.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

Two weekly formal project meetings were conducted with a formal “Request for Information” procedure that were frequently communicated and updated per email between the various team members.

Tons of structural steel used 110 t
Structural profiles used Hot rolled H-profiles, hot rolled I-profiles, Angle profiles, circular hollow sections
Cladding profile/ type used IBR
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 1100m2    2.8 tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Fourie Consulting Engineers
Client/ Developer

 

 

Graskop Gorge Lift Company

In partnership with the NEF

(National Empowerment Fund)

Architect Förtsch and Associates Architects
Structural Engineer LEW Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Engineer LEW Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Quantity Surveyor Siyakha Quantity Surveyors (Pty) Ltd
Project Manager Purlin Consulting
Main Contractor ENZA Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Quality Steel Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Quality Steel Construction (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra (part of the Safal Group)
Cladding Supplier Safintra Roofing Nelspruit (part of the Safal Group)
Cladding Contractor Roofing Solutions CC
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Babcock Nthuthuko Powerlines (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Photo competition Förtsch  and Associates Architects
Photographer, Other submitted images Förtsch and Associates Architects

ENZA Construction (Pty) Ltd

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Club 2

The new Club 2 Building in Hazelwood, Pretoria, is set to become a landmark property in the city. The modern, industrial yet retro look and feel, combined with the striking curved roof, has made it a hotspot for local tenants.

In 2015, Atterbury Properties appointed Hofman Architects to design a space that would accommodate a gym as well as office spaces. Situated on the corner of Pinaster Avenue and 18th Street in Pretoria, Club 2 builds on the prestigious Club One office building that was designed and completed in 2011. The five office floors of Club One are leased to the University of South Africa, with popular retail areas such as Hogshead Craft Beer and Hudsons The Burger Joint occupying the ground floor section.

The brief from the client to the architect evolved over time.  Initially, the brief was to design a building for Planet Fitness on the intersection South of the precinct, with an office component to make up the bulk on the Northern end of the property.  When the design was presented, Atterbury was so impressed that they decided to move their head office to the new building. 

This decision changed the brief to the architect in a few ways. The office component had to mirror the design of the client’s offices and it had to move to the prominent South corner of the building. The gym, in turn, had to move to the Northern section of the property without it losing visibility and exposure from passers-by.

The ideal design for a gym of this magnitude is a “warehouse” type structure.  With this in mind, the design was always envisaged as a steel structure. The office component has a beautiful, industrial theme, which can easily be accommodated by steel structures.

The building is constructed of a curved portal frame structure with large I-beam sections. 

The roof cladding that was specified for the project is KlipTite by Global Roofing Solutions. The cladding was cranked around the curves of the portal frames with custom made flashing detail to accommodate the curved roof.  The walls were constructed out of a combination of brickwork and the Imison lightweight wall system.

One challenge that the design team encountered was cladding the curved radius of the large section I-beams.  To overcome this challenge, these sections were manufactured and not rolled. Ensuring that the exact placing of these sections aligned with the columns on site was challenging, as were the flashings that were needed. The design team had a few flashing prototypes made and in the end a custom designed flashing had to be created to accommodate the curved roof.

The curved portals on the property are particularly unique, innovative and aesthetic. The portals step up and down over box gutters to let natural light into the interior spaces, and they step in and out over the façade to create deep overhangs to accommodate shaded public spaces over the entrances of the building.  This design element is what gives the building its unique appearance. 

When working on a steel structure, attention to detail is of paramount importance as any design flaws and errors can be quite unforgiving. The contractors, engineers and architects worked well together to resolve any details as and when they arose. Ongoing inspections of the steel work and a culture of collaboration and innovation led to the successful outcome of Club 2.

Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite
Cladding area/ coverage 3400m2
Cladding tonnage 18 Tons

Project Team

Project Team  Role             Company
Nominator Global Roofing
Client/ Developer Atterbury
Architect Hoffman Architects
Structural Engineer DG Consulting
Quantity Surveyor
GK Project and Cost Engineering
Main Contractor Wilson Bayly Holmes Construction
Steelwork Contractor LTS Steelwork
Steel Erector LTS Steelwork
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Cladco

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.