CMH Kempster Ford Dealership

The elliptically shaped building with an asymmetrically placed circular inner core was designed for BMW Umhlanga in 2000 and the roof consisted of a concrete ring beam with a tensile tent-type structure attached to it. CMH Kempster Ford, the building owners decided to convert the building into their new flagship dealership that would satisfy Ford international’s CI. The original building had no thermal qualities and it was only projected by a 2mm membrane. Needless to say, the internal thermal comfort was not great and had to rely on mechanical cooling.

Steel was the obvious choice due to its flexibility, durability and aesthetic value. The steel members allowed for great long and shallow spans and also for it to be extended beyond the building façade for greater solar protection. Braced roof overhangs of 4,0m were achieved and bring with it an added aesthetic dynamic.


The roof super-structure radiated from the internal circular ring beam to the oval-shape external ring beam using a combination of gusseted rafters for the shorter spans to I beam/angle-iron type trusses for the longer sections.

Due to the geometry of the structure very careful consideration design innovation had to be given to the roof and side cladding. The roof structure was a series of overlapping circular rings and GRS recommended Ziptec due to its ability to be tapered around the circular roof-scape. Another reason for choosing Ziptec was due to its high wind-loading capabilities as the sheeting was laid on a six-degree pitch. Horizontally laid IBR sheeting was used on the vertical face of the elliptical building and each every sheet had to be specifically rolled to the correct radius to fit each segment of the façade. The balance of the building façade was a combination ColorPlus – S Profile sheeting fixed horizontally to large parts of the building as well as Hulabond HBS Aluminium System Panels attached to a curved steel sub-structure. The latter work was done by Façade Solutions and the Colorplus sheeting was prepared and supplied by GRS

Due to the complex and intricate nature of the design and installation of the project, it was imperative that all the stakeholders be involved from inception. Experience played a major role in the ultimate success of the project and the client employed two key professionals that were involved in the project when first constructed in 2000- 2001. The Engineer, Linda Ness from NJV Consulting Engineers and the Architect from Hans Coetzee Architect. Linda Ness nominated Impact Engineering for the work at hand and their input and manufacturing abilities proved to be a catalyst of the ultimate success of the project. Their only recommendation was that GRS be involved due to their ability to provide the correct sheeting and cladding products from a design and supply point of view. The timelines were manic due to the clients trading requirements but all parties got stuck in and delivered an awesome new building to CMH Kempster Ford. Hans Coetzee Architect provided the services of Project Manager and Principal Agent.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 30 MARCH 2018
Completion date of full project 30 MARCH 2018
Tons of structural steel used UNKNOWN
Structural profiles used I-BEAM / CHANNEL / COLD ROLLED ANGLES
SA content – if this is an export project LOCAL SUPPLIER:  IMPACT ENGINEERING
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding 26 JULY 2018
Cladding profile/ type used ZIPTEK 420      0.8MM GR9017 HAZY GREY N/F  

IBR 686            0.53MM AZ200 SLATE  N/F

KLIPTITE          0.53MM AZ200 RAIN CLOUD N/F

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage ZIPTEK 420      2326m²             7.310 TONS  

IBR 686            359m²               2.900 TONS     

KLIPTITE           159m²               830 KG

PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer CMH
Architect Hans Coetzee Architect
Structural Engineer NJV Consulting Engineers
Project Manager Hans Coetzee Architect
Main Contractor Impact Engineering
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering
Steel Erector Impact Engineering
Roofing and Cladding Global Roofing Solutions

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Cummins Southern Africa Regional Office Project

Sitting between Johannesburg and Pretoria, Waterfall is one of the largest urban developments, housing a concept which connects and integrates lifestyle and business.  Featuring high-quality purpose-designed buildings with a focus on mixed-use precincts, this area is already home to notable corporate beacons such as PwC, Deloitte, Dimension Data, Amrod and the BMW Group SA.

In the heart of the Waterfall Logistics Precinct, the new Cummins Southern Africa Regional Organization building rises from its prominent site alongside the N1 Highway off Allandale Road.

The aim for this mixed-use site was to deliver a unique and iconic modern design, which not only functions with integrity, flexibility and efficiency within the warehouse and office structures but also delivers a visual and fascinating experience for vehicles on the N1 as an iconic structure from all elevations. While every aspect of the facility was guided by the Cummins International Design standards with local adaptations, Empowered Spaces Architects has adapted and moulded these ideas into a marvel of design, making use of different colours and materials to accentuate the profile of the office and warehouse structures.


What was the brief to the architect?

To Create / Design a New Idea & Concept

The fluidity of the geometric forms was important in the massing of the structures, creating a regular gridded planning that was extrapolated into usable spaces which are seen in various progressive arrangements throughout the design. The combination of structural architectural elements grounded on a base format sets the tone for the overall three-dimensional form, the play and juxtaposition of heights and colour arrangement allowed for the desired architectural forms.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The structure is supported by 320 Tons of steel and roofed with GRS Klip-Tite steel sheeting, whereby sheeting accommodated the Architectural concept of the building.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

Hot & Cold Roll Profiles

Cranes will be installed in the building, as car/truck motors shall be assembled in the warehouse. Heavy steel was needed to support the structure. 

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

To accommodate the design, cranking a sheet either side, GRS assisted to design a step-lap to accommodate the aesthesis of the design.   

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

To create a visually exciting but functional building envelope that captured all the required amenities set out by the client without disrupting work efficiency. To create a model of visual and functional architecture that house numerous advanced design technics and construction but still allows universal access.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All teams worked well towards the end goal. The integration and support from GRS, the suppliers or roofing and cladding worked well with the roof installer and Architect on site constantly to achieve a stunning profile. Support from Alubond (Stalcor) was greatly appreciated when they supplied the Aluminium composite panels.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 23/11/2018
Completion date of full project 2019/01/28
Structural profiles used Hot and cold rolled profiles
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding 31st October 2018
Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite, Nu-Rib
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 11750m2 Roof, Cladding 7000m2 (Total of 112 Tons)
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Global Roofing SA
Architect Empowered Spaces
Civil Engineers DG Consulting Engineers
Quantity Surveyor Schoombie Hartmann
Project Manager CAPEX Projects
Structural Engineers DG Consulting Engineers
Mechanical Engineers WSP Group Africa
Other Consultants Daniel Rebel Landscape Architects
Principal Contractors Group Five Building
Roofing and cladding manufacturer Global Roofing SA
Electrical Engineers QUAD AFRICA Consulting
Fire Consultants WSP Group Africa

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

The 1054

The 1054, strategically named after the property’s erf number, firmly places itself on Main Road Walmer, as a pavilion to the street edge.  Main Road has been established, as part of Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s Spatial Development Framework Plan, as a new business precinct within the bay and is expanding rapidly. Although business is growing along this main feeder route, many houses have merely been facelifted with a false façade that has really watered down the potential for the strip.

There were two main drivers behind the design of the building

Firstly, The 1054 needed to spark conversation about what is being developed, or not being for that matter along Main Road, and whether you love it or hate it, its intention is to initiate the discussion around what and how the potential of the road should be maximised by creating intrigue where buildings become destinations along the road, which sadly the currently renovated houses do not.  The 1054, is the first building of its kind along the 2.8km stretch of road.  Already within the 12months of the building’s completion, both property owners and developers have started to consider more exciting additions, alterations and in some cases new builds that are adding value to the street.

Secondly, as always, the budget was extremely tight and a design that both made the impact as above, as well as could be cost-effective was key.  The design needed to be stripped back of all the frills that we come to see on many commercial buildings and design a structure that used the buildings basic structural form to create interest. Through stripping back the building to its essential elements, time could also be saved, which for any developer is advantageous. 

A single dynamic contrasting form to the street was proposed, the construction of which was like that of a warehouse.  A concrete framed base structure, on which precast concrete floor slabs were laid and a supporting structural steel framed upper structure.  Steel sections consisted mainly of square hollow tube and H columns with lattice trusses.  The interior envelope and wall construction used lighter framed steel stud work. The building could be erected rapidly with many elements being manufactured off-site.  Total construction time was 9months with the building coming in below R10, 000.00/m² including all ancillary works.

The building design played with solid and void, not the buildings external envelope, but the contrast of the seemingly solid exterior vs. its light and airy interior, the volume of which connects all businesses within and welcomes people up within the space.  A welcoming surprise to all. 

It was important for the building to be modular so that the ‘structural grid’ could be broken/sub-divided into smaller or larger sections based on the same repetitive GLA to accommodate different sizes of businesses that would establish within the space.  Currently, the building consists of a retail component to the Ground Floor, as it was essential to attract people in as a destination and in turn promote visibility for all other tenants namely the First Floor offices.  To the Ground Floor, we have a new concept restaurant, well-established furniture, and décor retailer and an up and coming hair salon.  The First Floor offices consist of us as an Architectural Practice, Structural/Civil Engineers, Finance House, Freight and a Pilates Studio.  The selection of tenants was fundamental for them to feed off each other but also to ensure the longevity of the mix for the developer.  

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork January 2018
Completion date of full project April 2018
Tons of structural steel used 1850
Structural profiles used I-Beams/I-Columns/Lattice Trusses/Box Sections/Lip Channels
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding February 2018
Cladding profile/ type used Saflok 410
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 1373m2
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator DMV Architecture
Client/ Developer Symbolic Investments Propriety (Pty) Ltd
Architect DMV Architecture
Structural Engineer MEB Consulting Engineers
Main Contractor Jeremy Delport Construction
Steelwork Contractor Bisho Steel
Steel Erector Bisho Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Clad All
Cladding Contractor Clad All

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

St John’s Shopping Centre

Cladding profile/ type used NewLok AZ 150 Thunderstorm & Saflok 700 (Zincal)

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Cenprop
Architect TC Design Architects
Structural Engineer Stewart Kerr Engineer
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Skyline Projects
Principal Agent TC Design Architects
Main Contractor Robertson and Poole
Steelwork Contractor Paragon
Steel Erector Paragon
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Brown Deck Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Kierran Allen Photography
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Loftus Park

Loftus Versfeld and its surroundings are set to get a massive economic and aesthetic upgrade with the construction of a Rl.2 billion shopping and office precinct. The project, which will consist of shops, restaurants, an office park, a hotel, a gym and a sports museum. This futuristic and environmentally friendly project will be positioned at the corner of Park and Kirkness streets and will be bordered by Pretoria High School for Girls and Loftus Versfeld Stadium. The development will occupy the entire tennis court and the open field parking on the north side of the stadium. The buildings are all green star rated. The old Northern Transvaal Tennis Union heritage building (the old Sin Bin) will also be restored and will find a place within the precinct. It’s the Heritage Building of the Northern Transvaal Tennis Union. It was their old clubhouse and they have relocated to Groenkloof, they will be restoring the building and will make commercial use of the building.

Several tenants had already been signed to rent space in this comprehensive development which would include premium grade commercial office space, hand-picked shops with novel retail outlets, a state-of-the-art gym, restaurants, an open-air piazza, a sports medical center, a sports exhibition center and a four-star hotel.

Delport announced that the mixed-use development will host the first Radisson RED hotel in South Africa. The world’s first Radisson RED Hotel opened in Brussels, Belgium only last month.

“Loftus Park is proud to welcome this new concept as part of the project’s first phase,” he said.

Radisson RED is a new lifestyle select brand inspired by the ageless millennial mindset and has a forward-thinking design.

Situated on the northern side of Loftus Versveld, Loftus Park would be built in three phases and could also see the northern facade of the iconic rugby stadium being refurbished to fit in with the look and feel of the new development.

“Service upgrade initiatives for Loftus Park include the upgrading of traffic intersections, reducing traffic bottlenecks in Park and Kirkness streets with additional lanes, new traffic signals, traffic calming measures, street lights and pavements aimed at improving the flow of motorised and pedestrian traffic in the precinct as far afield as Magnolia Dell,” Delport said.

Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Saflok 700/ Newlok
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 2700m²

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Abland
Architect Studio 9 International
Structural Engineer Not provided by nominator
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager Redefine Property Group
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor Ferro Eleganza
Steel Erector Ferro Eleganza
Cladding Manufacturer Not provided by nominator
Cladding Supplier Not provided by nominator
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Sublime Film
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hino Westmead

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?
To carry out alterations & additions to an existing facility for Hino trucks

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end? The existing steel structure did not change. Only sheeting was carried out.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.) The client was going to carry out roof sheeting direct which ultimately would have created split responsibility in the construction. The main contractor requested for the roof sheeting to be done through the main contract to prevent split responsibility and potential program issues.

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator  Safintra
Client/ Developer Mccarthy Limited
Architect Dimension Studio
Structural Engineer Kantley & Templer
Engineer Kantley & Templer
Quantity Surveyor Quanticost
Project Manager Dimension Studio
Main Contractor Norvo Construction
Steelwork Contractor N/A
Steel Erector N/A
Cladding Manufacturer FOUR SEASONS
Cladding Supplier  
Cladding Contractor  
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
 
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
 
Photographer, Photo competition Kierran Allen Photography
Photographer, Other submitted images  

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Gibela Train Station Cladding

Gibela Rail Transport Consortium is a new empowered South African rail company tasked with the revitalisation of rail transport in South African metro areas. The purpose of the Gibela Train Station project was to create a train manufacturing facility in Nigel, Gauteng.

A number of processes needed to be housed within the facility and the design team was tasked with creating a series of specialised warehouses that were not only functional and could accommodate all of the production processes, but were also aesthetically pleasing. Steel was chosen from the outset because it would enable a streamlined construction process that would meet the client’s budget restrictions.

The structural framing at the Gibela Train Station consists of I-beam sections from the columns. The entrance building has cellular beams while some of the warehousing buildings had lattice columns that were also made up of I-beams. The structure also included a cantilever canopy of 1.25 metres.

Over 300 tonnes of cladding was supplied for the 55000 m2 area that needed to be clad. Global Roofing Solutions’ Klip-Tite was specified for the project, which involved large spans and large sheeting. The sheeting was rolled on site and the product enabled the design team to achieve the desired results. A Safflok 700 0.55m profile was used for the roof and a 0.55 trim flute cladding was used for the vertical sections.

Many of the project team members were located at the engineering consultancy, which helped to facilitate collaboration and information sharing. Instead of the project team meeting on a weekly basis, the close proximity of many of the team members created a positive dynamic and contributed to the success of the project. The Gibela Train Station was delivered on time and within budget.

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Empowered Spaces

The new building for High Definition Interiors is located on 22 Holt Street Sandton. The brief to the architect was to create an A-grade office building that would maximise the views over the Johannesburg skyline (particularly the Randburg area) and maximise the bulk provided by the site.

The building was envisaged in steel from the start and the entire building was clad with steel, giving it an industrial look and feel. Global Roofing Solutions supplied over 8 tons of Brownbuilt 406 to clad the 1170m2 area. The architect chose this cladding solution as it provided the right warehouse feel, but also offered a sleek and clean aesthetic.

The cladding of the High Definition Interiors building is different to many other office buildings as this type of sheeting is typically associated with a warehouse. The architects are pleased with the result as it gives a new and different appeal to the office.

The building has an internal skin of brick to meet the thermal requirements for an office building, with the steel structure being fixed to the structural columns. The structural framing consists of I-beams and C sections.

The side cladding and aluminium cappings are supported on a light weight structural frame made up of cold formed lipped channels, and the roof sheeting is supported on a series of mild steel rafter beams and trusses in order to create a column-free double volume space on the first floor office level. These steel sections were chosen for their light weight structural efficiency in reducing the overall steel tonnage and hence project costs.

In addition to supporting the side cladding and roof sheeting, the structural framing system of the building needed to be concealed and designed around the double volume flush glazed curtain wall on the western side, and the large raking flush glazed corner window on the eastern side. The same principle applied to the sub-frame supports for the composite aluminium capping features that framed the corners of the building. This involved intricate detailing of the structural steel and close coordination with the Engineer, Steel Detailer and Architect.

The project team had a good and collaborative dynamic which contributed to the success of the project.

Cladding profile/ type used Brownbuilt 406
Cladding area/ coverage 1170m2
Cladding tonnage 8,3 Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Empowered Spaces
Architect Empowered Spaces
Structural Engineer IBP Construction Consultants

 

Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor IBP & Empowered Spaces
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Bantry Construction
Steelwork Contractor SE Steel
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Pinnacle
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Woolworths DC/ Communications Park

The purpose of the Distribution centre is to manifest in the hardware of the design, the most economical structure, and spatial format that is a combination of built budget, robustness and efficient product flow. The spatial make-up of the entire campus must both serve the myriad of possibilities in terms of vehicle use externally and internally, but also in terms of product storage, staging, incoming goods and out-going goods. Future proofing is a heavily considered aspect. The logistical design is the intertwined set of flows, identifying efficiencies and exploiting them as well as any overlapping synergies and putting this into reality. The architecture needs to respond to all of these.

The brief to the Architect was to co-ordinate the considered logistics, to build to a set budget in the most robust manner and to future proof in terms of a 5 year, 10 year and 15 year vision with multi campuses in mind. The DC also needed to be as vermin proof as possible and simple in terms of upkeep and cleaning.

The project was always going to incorporate steel into the design, as this becomes the most economical and column free way to extend a “shed” type space over a vast span, allowing free flow and staging areas for numerous product flows.

The structural framing is a simple truss and girder configuration, all connected down by steel columns onto what essentially is a vast concrete ring beam that surrounds and protects all the low level docking stations. The economy and design principle that makes this otherwise semi-unconventional, is that 2 separate grid structures were used throughout the build; one below for the concrete portals and one above for the steel. The concrete responds to the most efficient dimensions for maximising docking stations, being extremely robust, and the second grid responding to the steel structure above in the making of the most economical spanning steel structure above. The steel structure is a combination of I-sections, H-sections, Channels, Angles, Circular hollow sections, and Cold formed lipped channels. All these different sections were used for their different qualities to fulfil specific functions whether it’s a sag bar or a bearer beam.

The cladding was a simple vertical clad design, the IBR sheeting was fixed broad flute out with a Colourplus AZ 200 material. The upper 1100mm of the vertical cladding is a continuous polycarb sheet which tucks behind a large structural gutter, then Lapps onto the Colourplus AZ 200 sheeting below. The cladding starts here and is fixed as a single span extruded sheet to the drip trim slightly above the brickwork on top of the continuous concrete ring beam. The resultant gap between the sheet and the brickwork is closed with flashing. The polycarb sheeting to the top, allows natural light to filter into the warehouse and at a level where the building enjoys air extraction, thus allowing the light without contributing to the heat loading of the space. The natural light contributes to our green points in terms of access to the outside, humanising the space, and saving on the day time lighting.

In terms of the fabrication, the major issue we experiences was in terms of the steel accuracy and the cladding and roofing sub-contractors’ challenges with the system implemented. In a building of this scale it is virtually impossible to survey and hand over with everything level and true. We found the implemented cladding and roofing systems were able to deal with the challenges, but with special focus from the design and sub-contracting team. The resultant meetings met with agreement in terms of getting the structure and the covering membranes to work together, especially when fast track is integral to the project. The systems we have developed will certainly be used as a template going forward and improving these aspects of implementation.

The first major aesthetic consideration in terms of the roofing and the cladding, was to use conventional roofing in terms of budget, but to interchange with different colours so as to realise the client’s corporate identity. These simple colour changes brought focus and visual dominance to the office and important ancillary functions of the large scale warehouse complex. This also acts as an intuitive architectural signage within the functionality. The complex can immediately be identified to be owned and run by the client we represent regardless of the specific corporate signage hung from various locals.

The second aesthetic consideration was for the ancillary office buildings to have exaggerated clad elements as barge boards, so as to conceal the guttering, RWDP’s and steel structures behind, without necessarily extending the structure unnecessarily. This also served to neaten the appearance and contributing to the corporate image as mentioned above.

The project teams worked extremely well on this project, as we engaged with logistical experts prior the tender and had advanced the design to such an extent before tender. The building inspector had also commented that in all his years he had never seen such an accurate and finished building as compared to the approved council drawings he was walking with. We are extremely proud of this.

We enjoyed working closely with the contractor, the sub-contracting parties, the suppliers as well as the design team in terms of reaching our goal, well. We were pleased in developing an extensive set of documents handed to the client, dealing with guarantees, warrantees, assembly guarantees, snag remedy documentation and schedules identifying repair materials, repair details, anti-weathering agents and a comprehensive maintenance plan in relation to all that was done. This was also done with regard to the surrounding air as industrial fall out.

Tons of structural steel used 835.5 Tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, Channels, Angles, Circular hollow sections, Cold-formed lipped channels
Cladding profile/ type used IBR sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 7653m2

 Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Woolworths (Pty) Ltd
Architect R&L Architects (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Aurecon Engineers
Engineer Aurecon Engineers
Quantity Surveyor iQS Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager MDSA Project Managment
Main Contractor Stefanutti Stocks
Steelwork Contractor Mazor Steel
Steel Erector Mazor Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Coil Manufacturer (Cladding Supplier) Safal Steel
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Photographer, Photo competition Fourth Wall Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

 

Woodlands Dairy – Uht Warehouse

The purpose of the project was to provide a new warehouse facility which would serve as a central distribution center for Woodlands Dairy UHT products.

Our Clients brief was to design a warehouse of 18000sqm which they would need to occupy on a specific date. An important requirement was that the facility would need to be sufficiently sealed to eliminate any dust ingress and the height needed to accommodate a pallet raking system.

The warehouse was to link onto an existing warehouse and had to maximize the site and would need to be able to accommodate future expansion.

The structure was always envisaged as steel. Due to the extremely tight programme and budget, the  appointed main contractor was requested to investigate alternative methods which could be a cost saving and accelerate his programme. The option of concrete columns where looked at. In the end steel was chosen due to the speed of erection and flexibility of construction. All steel was required to be hot dipped galvanized. Due to the lead time of galvanizing and limitations on steel section lengths, all internal steel was to receive a Sigma coating.

The columns supporting the building was a combination of minimal reinforced concrete internally and hot rolled structural steel I sections and H sections along the perimeter of the building. The roof was supported by structural steel trusses comprising hot rolled angles with hot rolled T-sections used as top and bottom chords. The trusses spanned onto structural steel girders of a similar construction than the trusses. Bracing members were circular hollow sections.

The sites irregular shape and conditions as well as the Clients request to maximize the site, meant the warehouse required to change in angle along its length as well as a change in level due to the site slope. This all made for some challenging structural junctions and sheeting interfaces.

Dust proofing the warehouse was challenging. Junctions between different sheeting profiles of roof bullnose, side cladding and gutter interface as well as where the side cladding terminated at the concrete floor perimeter upstand. The structure had to be enclosed prior to the concrete floor being cast.

If it were not for the fact that we were a well-established project team we would never have achieved the quality of facility provided in the extremely tight time frame given.

Tons of structural steel used 572 Tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, T-sections, Circular hollow sections
Cladding profile/ type used Saflok 410/TUFDEK
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Roof Sheeting 20 140m2

Vertical Cladding 6 443m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Woodlands Dairy
Architect MMK Architects
Structural Engineer Sigma Consulting
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Johnston & Rosser
Project Manager MMK Architects
Main Contractor WBHO Construction
Steelwork Contractor USS (Uitenhage Super Steel)
Steel Erector USS (Uitenhage Super Steel)
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Cladall
Corrosion Protection
Coating
PPG Protective & Marine Coatings
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
USS (Uitenhage Super Steel)
Photographer, Photo competition Impact Studio
Photographer, Other submitted images Impact Studio

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.