Shoprite Climor Distribution Centre

The Shoprite Cilmor Distribution Park is the latest installation of the national distribution centre rollout for the owner/operator client, Shoprite Checkers. The project comprises more than twenty buildings, the largest of which are three warehouses serving as the core of the development. The biggest is the 76,000m2 Dry Goods warehouse, followed by the 18,000m2 Refrigerated Building and the 12,000m2 Returns Centre.

The architectural brief was to deliver purpose-fit infrastructure that is aesthetically pleasing, given the facility’s prominence from the adjacent freeway and surrounding neighbourhoods, while also maximising the value of the client’s investment. The architectural and structural teams collaborated closely to allow function to define form, yet ensure refined aesthetics and a wow-factor to the overall appearance.

Structural steel was the natural choice to realise the large open span roof structures and curved architectural features. The operational design required a 32x32m internal grid for the ambient warehouses and 24x24m for the refrigerated warehouse. No construction material other than structural steel could achieve the same construction economics for these light-weight, large-span roof structures under the given programme constraints.

The design of the buildings and the subsequent construction methodology were all centred around safe and fast erection on site, delivering a light yet failure-tolerant structure. The buildings are stabilized by large cantilevering concrete tilt-up columns that were constructed during the fabrication period of the steel. The largest of these columns was 24.3m tall, weighing more than 44tons. Starting off with a stable structure greatly reduced the risk during the erection of the long-span structural steel girders and trusses.

The girders were built-up from horizontally orientated UB chords laced with double equal angle web members. This configuration allowed optimized utilisation of the material and produced a girder that was easier to handle on site due to the lateral and torsional stiffness of the box-shaped assembly. The trusses for the ambient warehouses were classic lattices made from equal angle chords and web members. To provide a flat fixing surface for the refrigeration panels, the trusses for the refrigerated buildings were also boxed lattices with channels as chords.

The connection design and detailing, especially for the girder-to-column and truss-to-girder nodes, also aimed at a reduction of risk during the erection process. All major connections are first seated and secured, after which the main structural bolts or plates are fastened. This greatly reduced handling of heavy bolts and plates while girders or trusses were suspended from cranes.

The appointed specialist steel contractor, Mazor Steel, delivered 2963 tons of structural steel on time and to highest quality standards following a strict safety plan under constant scrutiny by main contractor, Stefanutti Stocks, who achieved over one million lost-time injury free man-hours on this project.

The size of the building and the resulting rainwater run-off lengths of the Dry Goods building supported the choice of a curved roof structure for these buildings. As a result of the curve, the roof angle increases with increasing run-off length, thus improving run-off performance of the roof. A jointless sheet transition from -0.5° to 0.5° was incorporated at the apex of the roof in order to avoid a large flat zone. Typical step laps were detailed to facilitate watertight installation and minimise the effects of temperature strain with the first sheeting laps occurring at slopes of more than 2°.

In order to ensure transparency of the sheeting tender, all tenderers were required to submit test compliance data as an entry criterion to the bidding process. This data was to be derived using the methods of the draft cladding code, SANS10237, which is in development by the South African Metal Cladding and Roofing Association.

Scheltema won the sheeting tender with GRS KLIP-TITE as the product of choice, rolled from Safal’s Colorplus Matte AZ150. Similar to the structural steel erection, the contractor deployed safe erection methods far above industry standard while tight collaboration between Safal, GRS and Scheltema ensured a high quality installation with an uncompromised guarantee for the client.

The project was completed on time and within budget while impressing with outstanding design and way-leading quality of works.

Tons of structural steel used ± 2 963 tons
Structural profiles used UB, UC, C, EA, CFLC, CHS, SHS, RHS
Cladding profile/ type used GRS KLIP-TITE™ roof sheeting, IBR side cladding
Cladding area/ coverage 118,140m2 roof surfaces, 19,914m2 side cladding
Cladding tonnage ± 787 tons

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Shoprite Checkers Properties
Architect Steyn le Roux Truter
Structural Engineer WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd
Engineer WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd
Quantity Surveyor iQS
Project Manager SiVEST
Main Contractor Stefanutti Stocks
Steelwork Contractor Mazor Steel
Steel Erector Mazor Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Safal Steel
Cladding Contractor Scheltema
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Advanced Galvanising (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Nu Nation Protective Coatings
Photographer
Photo competition
WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd
Photographer
Aerial photographs
Subiaco Photography

 If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Campus Square

Campus Square is a convenience centre situated on the corner of Kingsway and University Road, Melville. Anchor tenants include Pick ‘n Pay, Woolworths and a new Dischem, while the restaurant offering includes an upgraded Dros, RoccoMamas, enlarged Wimpy and a new Nandos. The Centre offers food, shopping, and convenience all under one roof and it is loyally frequented by students of the nearby University of Johannesburg.

The centre was recently extended and the brief to the architect was to create a very lightweight steel roof, with sidelights facing south to avoid heat gain.  A curved aspect was required on the sidelights to create a unique appearance. 

The extension of Campus Square was envisaged in steel from the start. Structural steel trusses (consisting of angles) at an average depth of 1m were used to span between 12 – 25m. I-beams were used where the roof span was less than 12m.

When tying into an existing building, there are usually unforeseen challenges that arise. With the extension of Campus Square, the existing building dimensions were not exact and the on-site dimensions weren’t measured prior to fabrication, which lead to the design team requiring additional brackets that had to be designed to enable the elements to span from column to column.

Another challenge that arose was that the designed steel members weren’t always available when they were needed, which delayed the construction process. To overcome this challenge and meet the deadline, a similar sized element was then identified and specified for the project.

A further challenge was dispensing of water off the existing roof which had a large number of steps and angles and new roof which was higher, a large concrete gutter had to be created between the two roofs, which in turn was used to support the steel structure.

The roof is undoubtedly an innovative aspect of the project. The roof was designed according to the minimum requirements as specified by the code, which resulted in a very light weight roof. Klip Lok 700 by Global Roofing Solutions was specified for the 8000m2 roof.

Fortnightly meetings were held where the professional team and contractor would discuss issues, progress and program to ensure the project runs smoothly. The end result is a successful extension of a widely popular convenience centre in Johannesburg.

Cladding profile/ type used KlipLok 700
Cladding area/ coverage 8000m2
Cladding tonnage 4,8 Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Key Stone properties
Architect Hammerhead Designs
Structural Engineer Axiom Engineers
Main Contractor Gothic Construction
Steelwork Contractor Nance Engineering
Steel Erector Nance Engineering
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Bosch Warehouse

Bosch is a prominent supplier of home appliances in South Africa. The company required a new factory and warehouse facility and appointed Empowered Spaces to design a facility that would ‘wow’ their staff and guests. The brief to the architect for the new facility, which is located in Witfontein opposite the Serengeti Golf Estate, was to design a factory and warehouse that ties in with the company’s corporate standards.

The warehouse was envisaged as a steel structure clad in sheeting from the start as this is renowned as the most efficient and cost-effective way to construct a warehouse. The structural framing consists of grinder trusses and a steel column structure which is supported by precast concrete columns.

What makes the new Bosch warehouse and factory unique is the use of corrugated iron sheeting, as this isn’t often specified for large warehouse structures. 125 tons of cladding was supplied to cover the 20 574m2 of warehouse area. Global Roofing Solutions’ Klip-Tite was the chosen steel sheeting for the project.

To speed up the construction process on site, the project team was appointed far in advance. This enabled the design team to issue the contractor with appropriate information ahead of schedule, which led to quick and efficient construction on site. The result is world-class warehouse that fits with the Bosch’s corporate brand and profile.

Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite
Cladding area/ coverage 20574
Cladding tonnage 125 Tons

Project Team

Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Bosch
Architect Empowered Spaces
Structural Engineer Kantey & Templer Engineers
Quantity Surveyor IBP Construction
Main Contractor Bantly Construction
Steelwork Contractor Steel Band
Steel Erector Steel Band
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Roofline

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

BMW Paint Shop re-roof

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

Refurbishment of current paint shop.

What was the brief to the architect?

Remove leaking paint shop roof and replace with a thermally efficient built up roof system.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation)  

Innovation, twin skin built up metal roof system with uncompressed insulation, to correctly and   accurately provide the desired R value.

Difficulty short duration on project, over Christmas period in JHB’s rainy season, no extension of times were allowed, so continuous project acceleration was required.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

Double skin, and larger than normal flashings. Over 75 penetrations in the roof with no back flashings.

Cladding profile/ type used Tufdek IBR Saflok 700
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 24000m²

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer BMW
Structural Engineer Nyletti Structural

Engineers Pretoria

Main Contractor MRC Group
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra South Africa
Cladding Supplier Safintra South Africa
Cladding Contractor MRC Group
Photographer, Photo competition Sublime Film

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

33 Baker Street

What is the purpose of the structure/project?

 To upgrade a very old building, to accommodate multiple tenants of which the main tenant is Standard Bank.

What was the brief to the Architect? 

To convert the existing building into a contemporary design with a status commensurate with the expectations of Sasol Pension Fund and Standard Bank as a tenant.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not, why was it built in steel in the end?

The curtain wall application to an existing concrete structure demanded a steel frame to achieve a modulated façade.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beam etc) and why?

 Mostly I-Beams with angular trusses was used to hold the roof.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc).

In view of the fluctuating conditions inherent to the existing concrete structure, it was required that steel substructures be designed which would have sufficient adaptability to address the different conditions whilst being able to achieve a modulated curtain wall design.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the Engineer’s design – If yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Baker Street at its core was an upgrade of a current concrete building that was to be equipped with new structural steel to accommodate impressive looking glass and facades with paneling on the exterior. Essentially the overall appearance of the building was to be modified. The problem was getting accurate and existing concrete dimensions from site to work with the new Engineering/Architectural changes.

The Engineering drawings which was received had rugged ideas of what was required, in terms of the structural steel and, for a job like this, accurate measurements were of utmost importance.

In the end consultation and coordination between the Architects, Engineers, Glass-and Curved Façade team members, and Sheeting members had to work inwards from the outer most edges of the sheeting and glasswork.

However, the information provided by SVA, with regards to where everything had to be, completed, and getting the required support structures in design form, from the Engineers, allowed the Structural Steel Detailers to reconstruct what was needed from the ground up. The required structural steel did fit in, although tightly in places, but worked. Coordination on this level made everybody sure that everything would accurately fit in the end, especially using the exact three-dimensional (3D) Tekla models as well as proper DWG drawings, where everyone was able to double-check everything on their end. What followed from the new type of coordination with the Structural Steel Detailers leading the way was:  Problems being sorted out quickly in meetings, with nothing left unanswered where after it was checked and updated after meetings between all parties.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The steel frame principle allowed sufficient flexibility to achieve a curtain wall cladding accentuated with aluminum solid elements as well as utilizing the steelwork at roof level to support a balcony structure. The essential idea was to achieve a simplicity of structures that could be erected within a limited time.

How did the project team work together (e.g. Contractor involved early, challenges/ease of communication etc.)?

The design demanded a meticulous coordination of the Engineer’ requirements, the curtain wall shop drawings and the detailing of the solid aluminum elements during the pre-contract documentation stage and on-site construction. The coordination of the various disciplines, as well as management of the process on-site, proved to be efficient.

Tons of structural steel used 210 Tons
Structural profiles used Hot Rolled I-sections, Angles & CFLC

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator KRU Detailing CC on behalf of Central Welding Works
Client/ Developer Redefine- Sasol Pension Fund
Architect SVA Architects
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing CC
Engineer Sutherland
Quantity Surveyor Matla
Project Manager TPM project management
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor Central Welding Works
Steel Erector Central Welding Works
Cladding Manufacturer Hunter Douglas (Fancy Facades)
Cladding Supplier Hunter Douglas
Cladding Contractor Hunter Douglas
Glass Facades Diri Glass (Glass Facades)
Rigging/Cleaning Rails Gravity Access
Photographer, Other submitted images Central Welding Works

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.