Whalecoast Mall

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

Regional Retail Centre

What was the brief to the architect?

Provide a First Class Retail Centre, providing a welcoming shopping experience. A cinema / theatre is mandatory to the development. Aesthetic of the centre is to compliment the area and not detract from the natural beauty of the surrounding environment. Building is not to overpower the site and block all views of the coastline from the R43. The centre is to accommodate for the local and outlying neighbourhoods, sufficient amenities and parking is to be provided to do this efficiently and provide users with a good shopping experience.

How did the project team work together?

Concept design co-ordinated between the Architect and Structural Engineer. Structural Engineer together with Steel contractor and Contractor workshopped concept to make use of the lightest structural members without compromising the aesthetic and function required by the Architect and Client. Models were shared to assist in reducing clashes on site and reducing on-site alterations to prefabricated steel.

Tons of structural steel used 784 ton

(including wall stiffeners and shopfront supports)

Structural profiles used Mainly I’s, H’s, C’s and angles, Cold-formed lipped channel purlins. Circular hollow sections

 

Cladding profile/ type used Cladding Profile:( Material: 0.53mm Colorbond Ultra Matt) ( Profile: Saflok 700) by Safintra Roofing.

 

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 33 000m²

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Whale Coast Village Mall (Pty) Ltd

HCI Propcom (Pty) Ltd

Sandbaai Development Trust

Shoprite Checkers

Architect JL Design

Bentel Associates International

Structural Engineer Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor MLC Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager MDSA Project Management
Main Contractor Isipani Construction
Steelwork Contractor Mazor
Steel Erector Mazor
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra Roofing
Cladding Supplier Safintra Roofing
Cladding Contractor Cladco Projects
Photographer, Photo competition Fourth Wall Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Victor Daitz Mathematics Centre

The King Edward VII Mathematics Centre is located at King Edward VII School in Johannesburg. The project is a classroom facility with a hockey pavilion comprising both an upper viewing deck with kitchenette  facility and lower area of team ablution/change facilities, as well as a larger ablution facility for scholar use.

The brief to the architect was to propose a scheme as a fund raising platform from Old Boy donors. Two donors, Victor Daitz Trust and Edgar Droste Trust (both deceased Old Boys) stepped up to assist.

The project was to comprise initially 4 x mathematics classrooms and ablution facilities. This later expanded to incorporate a hockey pavilion and ablution facilities. The idea was to maximise the  small  space adjacent other classroom wings and minimise the number of peripatetic teachers.

From the outset, the project was envisaged as a combination of steel, concrete, brick and aluminium. The sunscreen roof was envisaged as a steel filigree screen with cutout patterns and as one of two elements which could give the project life, the aluminium balustrade being the other. The elements of geometry and mathematics are used here as an inspiration for the creation of their forms.

The steel elements of the project vary from Universal Columns to square hollow sections which are used as a giant order to the upper canopy roof to maximize the verticality as an offset to the flat canopy. The rafter and rear screen elements are IPE members and C-channels. The steel sheet canopy is suspended.

From an engineering perspective the challenges to the canopy roof were in the methodology in which the sheeting is suspended from its structure, as an inverted solution. The sheeting is read as a hovering plane that floats above the parapet walling at the building edge. The large over-sailing cantilever sheet at its point hangs off an extended beam and the framed system of beams and rafters. The cantilever similarly covers the passage way, whilst the hockey pavilion sheeting extends the roofline to match. The screen is grounded on double length columns which bypass the building and soar vertically straight to the canopy.

The challenges of fabrication were in the amount of steel sheet that was to be removed in the patterning. Too much cut out created a bend in the sheet, and as such the pattern had to be manually adjusted in order that it read as random, natural and poetic. Most of the panels therefore had individual patterning and as such this required close monitoring on the cutting and installation process.

The resulting aesthetic is a sensitive approach to mathematics and geometry which creates patterns in light and shade which varies constantly throughout the day and night. A visual delight juxtaposed to previous hard insensitive buildings.

The project team worked tightly together from project concept to project fruition. Both the  main  contractor and steel sub-contractor took the project on board as it was felt that it would be a challenge and something out of the ordinary for them to realize. The project team rose to the challenge and the process was fun.

We would like to think the results speak for themselves.

Tons of structural steel used 46t
Structural profiles used IPS, Universal Column and Universal Beam, Channels
Tons of LSF used 7t – Steel Framework, 2t (rafters)
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) Rafter spans – cumulatively 132m
Profiles used IPE Rafters, C-Channels
Cladding profile/ type used 2mm Stainless Steel sheet – Grade 409.
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 280m2 – 11.6t

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator StudioJoy+ Architects
Client/ Developer Business Manager – King

Edward VII School

Architect StudioJoy+Architects
Structural Engineer eStruct Consulting
Engineer eStruct Consulting
Quantity Surveyor Stuart Ray Skead Associates
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Akhane Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Hybrid Africa
Steel Erector Hybrid Africa
Cladding

Manufacturer

Metal Graphics
Cladding Supplier STALCOR
Cladding Contractor Hybrid Africa
Corrosion Protection

Galvanising

Hybrid Africa
Corrosion Protection

Paintwork Contractor

Hybrid Africa
Photographer, Photo

competition

StudioJoy+Architects/Terse

Photography

Photographer, Other

submitted images

StudioJoy+Architects

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Tradeport City Deep

What is the purpose of the structure/project?

The main purpose of the structures is to serve as a warehouse facility.

What was the brief to the architect?

The warehouse to be designed with large internal column spacing, creating a versatile open storage area and dedicated racking layout with minimal loss of space due to column interference.  The warehouse spanned over a total of 30,000 m2 in total comprising of three storage segments inside with a 12m clear eave height

 Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes, a combination of a face brick plinth wall with cladding onto a steel structure above plinth wall with roof structure and canopies. A Structural steel truss system comprising of large span girder trusses and secondary lattice trusses was chosen to provide the required clear span attributes.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beam etc) and why?

A combination of hot-rolled H-, I- and Angle Iron sections were used in parallel with cold rolled lipped channels.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the Engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The uniformity in structural shape and sections selected for the design made the fabrication process easy where the erection process could be streamlined.

How did the project team work together (e.g. Contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)?

 The use of Tekla Structures as primary draughting tool facilitated in the communication between design, Engineer, Structural Steel Detailer, and Contractor. Quick response, effective communication, and the ease of understanding the structural scope, that combined with professional team meetings and inspections.

Tons of structural steel used 720 Tons
Structural profiles used        Profiles used were standard columns, beams, lattice trusses and girders (angle irons), some of the ties were Circular hollow sections and the purlins and girts used were pre-galvanized 2mm lip channel sections

 

The completion date of cladding September 2017
Cladding profile/ type used NOVOTEXi Roof Sheeting

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator KRU Detailing CC
Client/ Developer Fortress Fund Developers
Architect ICM Architects
Structural Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services
Structural Steel Detailer KRU Detailing CC
Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services
Quantity Surveyor Quanti Cost Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Fortress Fund Developers
Main Contractor SE Steel Fabrication
Steelwork Contractor SE Steel Fabrication
Steel Erector SE Steel Fabrication
Cladding Manufacturer Pinnacle Cladding
Cladding Supplier Pinnacle Cladding
Cladding Contractor Pinnacle Cladding

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Soweto Sports Centre

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

A multi-purpose sports arena

What was the brief to the architect?

A multi-purpose sports arena for the Soweto community, to be able to practice various disciplines of sports in a world-class arena

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Design and fabrication of flashings and interfaces on site.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

Multi-angle interface of side cladding

Cladding profile/ type used SAFLOK 700
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 2500M²

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Not provided by nominator
Architect Iyer Architects
Structural Engineer Not provided by nominator
Engineer Archway Projects
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Shomang Construction
Steelwork Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra South Africa
Cladding Supplier Safintra South Africa
Cladding Contractor RSS Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Sublime Film
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

SA Airlink

SA Airlink is an international flight training facility for pilots that airline Airlink created in conjunction with Brazilian Aircraft Manufacturer, Embraer. Embraer has brought in full flight simulators to train international pilots on their aircrafts at the facility.

The brief to the architect was to design an internationally rated flight training facility that could compete with similar training centres across the globe. The architect was sent to other international training facilities to obtain information about what world-class training centres offered pilots and their goal was to design a flagship facility that could be marketed to international companies and pilots. The flight training facility had to include practical training areas, class rooms, full flight simulator facilities, a new departure lounge for SA Airlink’s flight operations as well as a heavy maintenance facility where maintenance on aircrafts could be done.

Certain parts of the training facility were envisaged in steel from the start. The architect’s inspiration for the facility’s design was aircraft fuser lodges, which led to a design that included unique, curving shapes of the building. The shapes and cladding wouldn’t have been achieved without the use of steel.

The simulator bay of SA Airlink has curved I beams. The design team tried to roll the six sections but rolling led to buckling. To overcome this challenge, the contractor bended and welded the beams together to obtain the desired curved shapes.

The office sections of the facility have very high shopfronts. To frame these areas, the team installed 254 columns with beams, which contributed to the modern, industrial look and feel that the architect wanted to achieve. There are also two hollow tube columns with expertly designed knuckle joints at the front of the building that simulates aircraft landing gear.

A lot of consideration was paid to the insulation of the building. Being situated next to one of the runways, the design team had to achieve a certain decibel rating to ensure a good acoustic environment for trainers and pilots. The isoboard was installed before the cladding.

Another challenge related to the cladding process was to minimise the clashing of services during installation. Due to the curved shape of the building, the cladding had to be rolled to a specific profile that had two different radius cranks, one of which is quite sharp.

The fabricators, engineer, contactors and steel contractors worked closely with the architects from the start. There were many services that had to go into the facility – including specific air conditioning ducts and mechanical elements – and coordinating the project execution required a team effort. The result is a world class facility to train pilots with state of the art equipment.

Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite & Corrigated
Cladding area/ coverage 1425m2
Cladding tonnage 8 Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Comair
Architect Skylan Architectecture and Design Studio

 

Structural Engineer P Design CC

 

Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Quanticost Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Belo & Kies Construction (Pty) Ltd

 

Steelwork Contractor Pretorius Staalwerke
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Roofing Guarantee (Cladco completed this project)
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Radisson Hotel at Silo 6

The Radisson Red hotel located in Silo 6 has art, music and fashion at its core. It is an upmarket hotel that caters to business travellers, international travellers and families. This 252-room Hotel, recently completed, is the first in South Africa of a new offering by the Radisson Group. The vibrant 4-star brand, Radisson Red, caters for a younger, trendier segment of the tourist market.

Situated immediately adjacent to the precinct’s Centrepiece, MOCAA (museum of Contemporary African Art), this project occupies a critical position. With MOCAA as the focus, and the existing BOE building on the opposite side, Silo 6 was designed to complement this composition of three buildings.

Conceptually, the building is a ‘wall’ building that defines the outer edge of the precinct and in mirroring the scale of the BOE building, showcases MOCAA as the focal point. Architecturally, the wall concept is expressed literally through the creative use of rendered brick construction on the East and West facades while the North and South facades reflect the Dockland’s industrial heritage using Steel and Glass.

The punctured fenestration on the East and West facades reflects the rational floor layout of rooms and is expressed using a custom designed protruding Aluminium frame. Juxtaposed against the rough brickwork, this device is a key contemporary insertion in the architectural expression of the building. The building has been awarded a 5-star Green Building status.

The project site had an existing super basement that was designed to accommodate a generic building on top of it. During the time when the basement was constructed, the client (V&A Waterfront) wasn’t 100% sure whether the building would be a hotel. The Rezidor Hotel Group/ Raddison Red later become the operator of the Radisson Red Hotel at Silo 6.

The Radisson Group has their own design requirements for creating a hotel and the brief to the architects was to adhere to their standards and to create a hotel that would maximise the number of rooms as well as fit into the Silo District, which has become a landmark in South Africa’s Mother City.

To create a commercially viable hotel, stay within the brand standards and requirements, and maximise keys of the third Radisson Red hotel in the world, the design team had to think out of the box. Not only did they have to respond to an existing structural grid that didn’t relate to a hotel configuration, but they also had to carefully consider how the north façade of the hotel would complement the Silo 6 district.

The structural gymnastics that the team employed included introducing V-columns to create a layout that would accommodate a hotel, and the north façade of the hotel included interesting steel solutions and careful placement of cladding pannels to create a playful ‘random’ rhythm within the framework.

There is a concrete frame structure with steel elements clipped onto the façade. The north façade is articulated with balustrading and channels that are fixed to the concrete structure with steel. The façade articulation speaks to the notion of an industrial area, which is appropriate for the context of the Silo 6 precinct which includes a working shipyard, a museum and other landmark buildings.

 The design team fixed vertical flat plates to the concrete frame structure in a series of angles to frame the balustrade modules. The beta fence panels (fencing panels) were then fixed to tubular sections. The concrete slab was then finished a C-channel that is fixed to the concrete edges, which created a unique and beautiful façade articulation. Red cladded panels create privacy for guests on their balcony. Bright red was an aesthetically pleasing way to introduce colour into the north façade while speaking to the operator’s brand, and created a seemingly random pattern on the façade.

One of the challenges that the design team encountered was a manufacturing error that led to an incorrectly sized balustrade height. The calculation error led to the design team having to adjust the design to avoid remanufacturing of the balustrade modular panels.

 The architects inherited a restrictive structural grid which informed a very constrained north suite façade configuration and the design team was tasked with articulating the north façade to create a playful ‘random’ rhythm in the framework. The balcony spaces vary in size due to the staggering of the red panels, which creates a beautiful façade.

 The challenge of the manufacture height was successfully overcome by the design team and the contractor working hand in hand to deliver the project on time and within budget. The team were able to collaborate to look at ways to achieve the desired results by modifying the fixing detail.

Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite & IBR
Cladding area/ coverage 270m2
Cladding tonnage 1,4 tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Not provided by nominator
Architect Peerutin + Design Space Africa
Structural Engineer Arup South Africa
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor MLC Cape Town
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Pepkor Warehouse

The purpose of the Pepkor Warehouse in Hammarsdale is to serve as a distribution centre for the Pepkor group. The distribution centre consists of the following aspects:

  • Total of 80 000m2 of covered warehouse space (180m wide and 440m long).
  • Main Ackermans office and a main Speciality office with 3000m2 and 1800m2 respectively.
  • A total of 4 node offices of 500m2 each.

The brief to the architect and the team for the structural portion of the project was the following:

  • Warehouse to be ±55,000m² for Ackermans and ±25,000m² for Pepkor Speciality in one building as per the Layout Plan.
  • Approximately 17.35m clear height to underside of eaves.
  • Reinforced concrete and structural steel all to Structural Engineer’s design incorporating appropriate corrosion protection where necessary.
  • Internal column spacing will based on a 33.2m x 30.5m grid (4 doors @ 8.3m centres = 33.2m).
  • The structure steel will be strengthened locally to allow for the installation of solar panels to a roof area of approximately 15,000m².

The warehouse was always envisaged to be constructed mainly out of structural steel. The main support columns of the warehouse were designed and constructed out of concrete up to 12.6m and 17m from FFL. The remainder of the structure was constructed out of structural steel.

The structural system used for the building was based on a girder truss system carrying lateral trusses that makes up the main elements of the roof. Various steel profiles were used for the building from hot rolled I-Beams, Angle irons, Circular hollow sections, cold rolled lipped channels and so forth.

The remarkable aspects of this project were the speed at which the steelwork was erected as well as the completion of the overall project. A total of 2500 ton of structural steel was erected (Main warehouse 2180 tons and canopies / offices 320 tons = 2 500 tons), with the erection commencing on 14 November 2017, and reaching completion of the main warehouse structure (2180 Ton) at the end of March 2017 (which includes a builder’s break). This remarkable achievement was achieved over a period of 90 working days to erect on average of 24 tons per day over a period of 4,5 months, using on average 8 cranes on site over the same period.

A sensitive construction program had the steel contractor under pressure from 19 August 2016 which was the date of appointment. Cadcon Steel Construction decided to enter in a joint venture with A. Leita Steel construction to reach the delivery various dates for erection. The on-site production required to meet the construction program resulted in an average of 485 ton of structural steelwork to be erected per month.

The entire project team worked together successfully throughout the entire duration of the project. Effort was made to design the structure in a manner that suits the various contractors involved at each step of the project to reach the various project milestones.

Tons of structural steel used 2 500 tons
Structural profiles used Hot rolled I-, H-, Angle section, Cold Rolled Lipped channels

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator EDS Engineering Design Services (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Rokwil Property Development
Architect T C Design Architects
Structural Engineer EDS Engineering Design Services (Pty) Ltd
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor MHS Consulting Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Dave Armstrong
Main Contractor Abbeydale Building and Civils (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon Steel Construction and Engineering
Steel Erector Fanie Leibrandt Steel Erectors
Cladding Manufacturer Macsteel Service Centres (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Macsteel Service Centres and Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Dram Industrial Coating
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Abbeydale Building and Civils (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images  

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Momsen’s Bikes/ Two wheels trading

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The restoration and re-purposing of the historical South End ‘Row Houses’ is to house the new Momsen and Two Wheels Trading head office.  Momsen is the leading mountain bike brand in South Africa and wished to be housed back within the ‘Baakens Valley’ where it all began for them as a brand. The existing ‘Row Houses’ would service the office and retail components with a new warehouse building the rear, serving as the distribution and bulk storage component.

What was the brief to the architect?

The building owner required a design that would retain the essence and rhythm of the historical elements that faced the street.  This needed to inform the design and massing of the warehouse and retail components.  It was important to satisfy all Heritage requirements, yet at the same time create a building that, planning wise, would best serve the tenant, i.e Momsen Bikes and Two Wheels Trading.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes.  The warehouse form and need for free span could only be done best in steel.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The warehouse was broken down into 4 pitched sections to that drew inspiration from the adjacent 4 dominant Row Houses. The warehouse, however, was orientated perpendicular to this so as not to overpower the smaller houses along the street. The warehouse’s main portal structure is formed using I-beam and columns of varying sizes.  Lipped channels then span the portal frame bays.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The structural frame was clad in Saflok sheeting both for the roof and vertical side walling.  The 4 pitches that form the warehouse, although of the same height, varied in depth that further broke the scale of the building down. This posed complexities where the vertical cladding elements as the sheeting needed to seamlessly travel down from the roof into the wall, yet allow for neat flashing and valley gutter detailing.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The only challenge was to translate our Architectural ideas to both the Contractor and Engineer.  Although the warehouse is fairly simple in terms of fabrication it was crucial, through the use of 3D’s, to make sure the contractor and engineer understood the detail between steelwork and cladding elements.  Many additional items, such as cleats, hanging brackets and the like were introduced specifically to allow for easy and interpretation of the cladding which would form the overall aesthetic of the building.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding
in this project?

For DMV Architecture the seed idea was simple. The rhythm of the ‘four’ Row Houses were replicated within the ‘four’ apposing warehouse forms.  These were intentionally a play-off on the number and rhythm of the four houses, yet were positioned perpendicular to them.  It was our opinion that if placed in the same line of the house gables, the warehouse would dominate the residential scale. In placing them juxtaposed, it helped create each owns identity and purpose.  Further to this, the original Row Houses, which terminated in gable ends as part of their vernacular routes, were again juxtaposed and the warehouse adopted a roof that would precede the gable ends opposite to that of the vernacular.  In doing so each one’s identity complimented the other and reinforced their unity.

To the West, the warehouse as a gesture is set back from the boundary to allow the full extent of the first Row House to stand proud as one approaches the building down Upper Valley Road.  This first house retains its original identity by keeping the lean-to to the rear (full extent of original house) and direct access off the street with steps and inter-leading balcony.  With security being an issue within the valley the client naturally wished that no other house is accessed off the street and that the steps be removed so as to reduce the risk of break-ins.  The existing internal floor level is raised from the natural ground level externally so it made sense for the steps to not allow intruders the ability to view inside the new office space.  It was fundamental though to retain the memory of the original steps and main entry to the houses.  It was decided to therefore re-introduce the steps by making use of a thickened plaster to mimic their form in the same plane as the buildings plinth.  The original entry to the balconies were also enclosed but painted, together with the ‘steps’ in a deep grey to further highlight this memory.  To the East the showroom, which too was once an original house, yet detached and not as significant as the Row Houses, was remodelled to take on the same footprint yet in a sheeted contemporary manner with the showrooms framed shop fronts linking back to the houses.  The vertical sheeting also was a play off on the tin sheet cladding of the original.  The gap between the original detached house and fourth Row House was naturally an axis upon which to slide into upon entry and helped establish a break between the internal functioning of the new development, that being office to the Row Houses and Showroom to the detached house.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

For us communication is key. The use of 3D information provided to all role players helped ease the communication flow and reduction in errors and or time delays on site.

Tons of structural steel used 38.6 tons
Structural profiles used I-Beams/Lipped Channels
Cladding profile/ type used Saflok + Corrugated
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Saflok 1309m2 | Corrugated 350m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Gary Erasmus Trust
Architect Dmv Architecture
Structural Engineer Poise Consulting Engineers
Engineer Poise Consulting Engineers
Quantity Surveyor N/A
Project Manager Dmv Architecture
Main Contractor Dave Collins Construction
Steelwork Contractor Uitenhage Super Steel
Steel Erector Uitenhage Super Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Ceiling Master
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Sl Photography
Photographer, Other submitted images Sl Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mercedes Benz J-site Logistics Building

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

In order to reconfigure its processing operations for a new model, Mercedes Benz South Africa (MBSA) is looking to upgrade part of its facility based in East London. One of the upgrade works involves the construction of a new logistics building on J-Site within the East London plant. This project involves the construction of amongst other structures, the following:-

  1. a) J site Logistics building,
  2. b) Gate House to replace the existing
  3. c) Hawker Stalls to replace the existing
  4. d) Dry Link connection between the J Site building and the existing F11 Assembly building
  5. e) Truck Canopy

The client opted for a turnkey contract solution for the project and Stefanutti Stocks were appointed on February 2017.  AECOM were appointed by Stefanutti Stocks as their design consultants.

What was the brief to the architect?

The client’s aimed to construct a new Logistics Building with good accessibility for suppliers and a good connection to Assembly to feed the manufacturing process, with the building footprint maximising all available space on the site. The turnkey contractor was to propose energy saving initiatives which needed to be incorporated into the design.  The principal design philosophy is to provide a structural support arrangement which provides a robust and sustainable structural solution, ensuring the space provided is suitable for its intended use.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The Logistics building is approximately 21 000m2. A gridline system of 28m in the East-West direction and 15m in the North-South direction is used. The Logistics building has a structural steel roof with a slope of 2% (1.2 degree pitch).  Hot rolled IPE purlins are spaced at 3.0m and span 7.5m between the trusses. The trusses span 28m and are supported on girders spanning 15m. The trusses and girders are 2.2m deep and consist of UC’s for the top and bottom cords and double angles for diagonals. A clear height of 10m is allowed for between the floor and underside of the roof trusses. All services are therefore located within the roof cavity. To maximise the usable floor area and ensure flexibility for racking layouts, no vertical bracing was used.  This also ensured that expansion of the building could take place in all directions.  To obtain lateral stability, the concrete columns were used up to 8m above floor level and catladders with a perimeter parapet were provided for maintenance.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The exterior of the new building is largely an aluminium cassette facade to avoid corrosion, with corresponding insulation.  The roof is constructed with 2 layers mineral torch-on plastomeric waterproofing membrane that is each 4.5mm thick on 60mm fibre rock wool insulation board. The board is fixed to Safintra Saflok 700 0,8mm thick steel AZ 150 (inverted) sheets, which are in turn fixed to the purlins.  The non-standard 0,8mm steel Saflok sheet was rolled and load tested at the Safintra premises in Pinetown.  This was required due to both the load and spans being beyond the product catalogue guidelines, as well as the sheeting used in an inverted position to provide almost continuous support to the insulation board.  A complete mock-up of the roof system was built at Safintra’s premises for testing purposes as well as on site for the client’s approval.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Little in the way of fabrication and erection challenges were encountered due to the fact that the concept design involved all parties – steelwork contractor, shop drawing detailer and the steel erection team.  Available sections, lead times, splice positions and section lengths, transport and erection were all discussed and agreed on before final design commenced.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The roof design loads on the Logistics Building include future PV cell installation, the self-weight of the built-up roofing system, technical services and conveyor loading.  This loading is far in excess of the average industrial building loading, resulting in a potentially heavier overall structure. Savings on the steel tonnage was however made by breaking away from the norm in utilising hot-rolled purlins, designing out the requirement for sag bars, and truss and girder connections were fashioned to eliminate the need for gusset plates.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All design and contracting disciplines on the project worked within an integrated 3D environment. With the ability to interrogate models virtually before breaking ground on-site led to significantly less RFI’s and reduced critical clashes on-site when compared to traditional 2D based project workflows. Consultants generally create design intent models up to about an LODev (Level of Development) 300, on the J-Site Project we were able to run clash detection bi-weekly against the design Revit models using a combination of Autodesk BIM 360 Glue and Autodesk Navisworks software. The once fabrication models were completed by the steel fabricator in Tekla software, we were able to do our final clash detection checks against with models up to LODev 500. At this year’s Daimler Supplier Awards, which recognises Daimler’s suppliers for outstanding performance, Stefanutti Stocks Pty Ltd was recognised for its excellence in the Partnership Category for the Mercedes-Benz Logistics Warehouse and Gate Complex. This is a reflection of the collaboration on the project between all parties.

Tons of structural steel used ±818 tons including Truck Canopy
Structural profiles used Hot rolled open sections, cold formed lipped channels
Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Tufdek Aluminium Cladding, Safintra Saflok 700 steel decking (0,8mm thick) inverted roof sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 23 500m²    35tons (Roof), 8 700m²    155 tons (Side)

This project overview, motivation and technical information was provided by the project nominator. If you were a part of this project and notice that information is incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.


Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AECOM
Client/ Developer Mercedes-Benz South Africa
Architect AECOM
Structural Engineer AECOM
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Stefanutti Stocks
Project Manager AECOM
Main Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Insimbi Coatings
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Inoxa Manufacturing Facility

The Inoxa Manufacturing Facility project came about due to an international crockery manufacturer’s desire to open a manufacturing facility in South Africa. The facility manufactures products for the South African market, as well as for export.The client for this project was Shree Property Holdings (SPH), who developed the property for lease to Inoxa Manufacturing.

From the start of the project, SPH consulted with both Davgo and Steelkon Projects to find the most suitable structural steel solution for the specific site and client requirements. The tenant required a linear manufacturing process and product flow, which led us to the current design of a 50 metre wide by 350 metre long building.

The building is divided into 3 distinct zones, each with it’s own characteristics in terms of steel structure.The first zone is the Manufacturing Zone, which measures 50m by 143m. This zone comprises two 25ton overhead crane gantries, each with a span of 23m, both of which run the full 143m. The crane rail height is at 9.2m above FFL, and hence the eaves height is at

11.5 above FFL, to accommodate the gantry cranes. Lattice type columns were designed for this zone so as to mitigate against the horizontal deflections caused by forces induced by the cranes onto the rails. The crane beams were designed as compound members comprising I-section beams with parallel flanged channel section caps.

The second zone is the Polishing Zone, which an extent of 50m by 71.5m. Here the manufactured products are cleaned and polished before proceeding to packaging. This process requires ample headroom and the most uninterrupted floor space economically possible. For these reasons, the eaves height of 11.5 was retained, and a centrally located lattice transfer girder was designed to span 3 bays (18.5m), which meant only 2 internal columns were used over the entire 2,600sq.m footprint of the Polishing Zone.

The third zone is the Warehouse Zone, which an extent of 50m x 136m. This is where the finished products undergo QC, before being packaged, and then stored whilst they await distribution. Since the tenant did not require high level racking, the eaves height for this zone was reduced to 9m above FFL. The same roof design as the Polishing Zone was used to keep internal columns to a minimum.

Added to the main building, a semi-detached office structure was also designed and supplied to suit the tenant’s needs. The office structure comprised a suspended slab and roof, with floor area of both floors totaling 5,000sq.m. This was originally supposed to be designed as a concrete framed structure with a steel roof, however due to the tight time constraints the development faced, it was decided to rather use a steel framed structure to support the pre-stressed concrete T-beams & topping slab. The main load carrying beams had to be deep I-sections since the spans varied between 7.5m and 9m. These were compositely tied to the slab by means of Y12 shear connector bars.

The office roof also used a lattice transfer girder in the centre of the 35m span width, resulting in only 4 internal columns over the 2,500sq.m footprint.The steelwork and cladding portions of the job were completed on time and without any problematic incidents, mainly due to the meticulous design, detailing, and planning of the steelwork with one of the main objectives being to minimize the complexity of the rigging. One of the challenges faced was the interaction between the rigging of steelwork and the rigging of pre-cast concrete panels, since the latter required steel members to be temporarily removed so as to allow the concrete panels to be installed and plumbed with ease.

The end result of this project is a landmark building on the KZN North coast, which is both functional and aesthetically pleasing externally and internally. When standing inside the structure, one is not only struck by the pleasing geometry, vast uncluttered space, and striking yellow paintwork; but also by the beautifully detailed lattice columns and girders which create curious geometrical shapes as you move around within the building.

A very satisfied client also adds to the prestige of being involved with this project.

Tons of structural steel used 500 tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, Angles, CHS, Crane Rails, CRLC
Cladding profile/ type used IBR 686 Colourplus AZ150
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Approx. 20,000 sq.m

Project Team 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator DAVGO Steel Construction
Client/ Developer Shree Property Holdings
Architect Zadar Studio
Structural Engineer Steelkon Projects
Main Contractor Shree Property Holdings
Steelwork Contractor DAVGO Steel Construction
Steel Erector DAVGO Steel Construction
Cladding

Manufacturer

Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Future Steel
Cladding Contractor DAVGO Steel Construction

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.