House Skosana

When it comes to the look and feel of a house, the owner is mainly interested in one thing. Having his/her home delivered as per the architect’s vision. This expectation can make the work of the engineer difficult, particularly as the engineer has to specify structural supports that satisfy complex architectural specifications.

Traditional structural elements are primarily designed to satisfy structural performance and low cost criteria. Therefore, it is challenging for modern engineers to meet architectural expectations, of say light and airy buildings, without subjecting the owner to great expense.

Having appreciated this challenge, we at Aura Entle asked ourselves why cost-effective structural solutions are not being developed to complement modern architecture, instead of structural elements being the cause of contention between engineers and architects. We found the answer in the Fluted Floor System (FFS) and more specifically, the novel product that we call the FFS Main Beam (FFS – MB), which was our innovation in the last year.

Mr Skosana, of Willow Acres Pretoria had a 7,0m long span where load bearing brick walls would typically sit to support the slab. Here, typical engineering practice would have had few options but to specify a hefty beam jutting out below the soffit, extending across the entire length of the opening – a costly compromise of the architectural vision of the high end home. Fortunately, that was a compromise that did not have to be made, thanks to Aura Entle and the FFS-MB.

Unlike other flat slab solutions the Fluted Floor System is self-supporting during construction without a need for props, formwork or cranes. It is a floor system with components that can be manually lifted and always fit within the body of the slab – without the need for visible beams – even when spanning over long openings on all the edges of the slab. Therefore the FFS was the perfect floor for the Pretoria designed home.

Over and above the impressive combined structural and aesthetic features lent by the FFS, the floor system offered high comfort through its superior built in insulation pockets that help isolate noise, providing a high degree of privacy between bedrooms above and public spaces below.

For the team at Aura Entle developing the FFS is further testament to how steel is the answer to the evolving desires that architects and clients alike seek for their projects.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 20/08/2018
Completion date of full project 06/11/2018
Tons of structural steel used 2.454
Structural profiles used Fluted Floor System
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Aura Entle
Client/ Developer RS Skosana
Structural Engineer Arrow Point
Main Contractor GTP Holdings
Steelwork Contractor Aura Entle
Steel Erector Aura Entle

 

6 Sidmouth Avenue Oranjezicht

6 Sidmouth Avenue is the remodelling of an existing old Oranjezicht home. Oranjezicht is an old suburb in the Cape Town city bowl, situated on the slopes of Table Mountain. Most of these old homes face north, look over the city below and have imposing but spectacular mountain views at their rears.

The existing old home was a typical 50’s ‘box’ type double story home but lacking real architectural merit. The brief called for a complete renovation and make-over. This involved adding a floor for a new main bedroom suite as well as gutting, re-planning and enlarging the living and kitchen areas on the lower levels. In addition, the landscape was reshaped with new outside living areas. Only what now is the middle level was retained in a planning sense.


The existing kitchen (at the rear) had to be opened to take advantage of the mountain views. By introducing a 1x8m steel girder weighing about a ton were we able to support the weight of the structure above and bring the views into the kitchen. This girder had to be craned over the house to get it in place. A new steel cranked roof, forming a kitchen living space was clipped onto the front of this girder. The cranked angle of this roof allowed unimpeded views into the kitchen and maximized the views from its adjacent living space. This room, in turn, opens up onto the pool area at the rear of the property.

Architect interview:

The use of reversed IBR profile cladding on the verticals was used as a device to tie in the new roof conversion with the old walls below. The result is a homogenous blend of the old and new, pulling the whole design together. We wanted to avoid the extension looking like an afterthought. One other innovation was the use of powder-coated steel window boxes which project from the façade. These have a dual role of being the main window flashing element in the lightweight walls and the finishing gasket against the IBR sheeting. This was used in lieu of the standard wide steel flat profile normally used around sheet façade openings.

Due to the old structure, there was uncertainty around the bearing capacity of the old walls, and it was decided very early on in the project to propose LSF. Many existing and critical ground floor support walls and beams were removed. To compensate, hot rolled structural steel elements had to be introduced under the existing first-floor slabs. The lightweight nature of LSF above was critical to the success of these supports. The nature of the steel cladding also lent itself perfectly to the use of LSF. A further challenge was to connect and combine the LSF roof elements with some long span timber laminated beams which spanned the entire length (gable to gable) of the upper level. 

I was already familiar with LSF technology, having used it on two prior projects. The prior experience I gained using LSF had introduced me to the key players in the industry, namely the structural engineer and the LSF contractor. I had also worked with the main contractor so that there was a familiarity in the professional team, and we had a good working relationship. Unfortunately, the LSF contractor ran into financial difficulty early on during the erection of the LSF. He abandoned the project leaving the client and the professional team to pick up the pieces. Our main challenge was that the budget did not allow us to re-tender the LSF and cladding and so the main contractor, client and myself project-managed the LSF. One of the LSF Contractor’s former erectors, a Zimbabwean named Para Chimimba, was brought in to complete the works. We, therefore, lost the time-saving benefits of using LSF. The project was delayed causing enormous financial pressure for the client and created a challenging working environment. Despite this challenge, we managed to pull it off – and the proof is in the result.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

LSFB /  LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work March 2017
Completion date of full project January/February 2018
Tons of LSF used 3 Tons
Profiles used 89mm .75 lip channel 

 

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding June 2017
Cladding profile/ type used IBR – inverted
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Chris Wood Architect
Architect Chris Wood Architect
Structural Engineer By Design Consulting Eng
Main Contractor Arba Construction
Steelwork Contractor Arba Construction
Cladding Manufacturer Youngman Roofing
Cladding Supplier Youngman Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mega Shed

First and foremost, the space was intended to be practical and utilitarian. It had to accommodate four cars and a workshop on the ground level, and a space in which the client could work, entertain and relax – a multi-use mezzanine level was incorporated for this purpose. Notwithstanding this functional focus, it was also intended for the structure to assume an interesting and visually pleasing form.


Background:

On a trip to Iceland in 2017 the client was struck by the number of buildings, both traditional
residential and modern commercial/mixed use, which were constructed in, or at least clad by,
steel. Furthermore, the clean lines and stark simplicity of Scandinavian design were greatly
appealing. Inspired by this, the client undertook a few concept sketches for a garage/workshop
which he thought would be an interesting project to undertake. He also wished to experiment with using steel as a building material, with a view to possibly employing the materials and methods in a house-build in the future.

Brief:
The brief from the client was to design a multi-use garage-workshop-studio in a Scandinavian minimalist style, based on the concept sketches and imagery provided. The client felt strongly that the structural materials used in the construction were to be celebrated and presented as feature elements, not concealed by plaster, paint, etc. Steel I-beams are left exposed throughout the structure and all the internal walls and ceilings are clad in raw Oriented Strand Boards (OSB), a material not often considered a finishing.

The client always envisaged using steel for the exterior cladding. The one inherent challenge was that the structure might appear too ‘industrial’ for a suburban setting. This was mitigated by the use of timber externally (both on the double sectional garage doors and the cladding on the underside of the roof overhang) and internally (with the use of OSB cladding throughout).

Structural framing:
The structural framing consisted of I beams and lip channels mostly to keep the costs to a
minimum as well as keeping the main framing as basic as possible. The I beams were used for
the main portal frame to also allow the internal timber cladding to terminate into the top flange of
the beam while leaving the rest of the beam exposed as a feature. The I beam for the mezzanine also allowed for the structural timber beams to be supported within the flange of the beam.

Cladding:
The cladding seemed a standard application, specialized workmanship was required in aligning the rib lines from the roof cladding down onto the side cladding, further, the complexity ensued in the flashing details, whereby the eaves flashing had to conceal the edge of the roof cladding and the flow of the water. The barge and corner flashing were made up to suit the rib lines of the cladding. A specially designed gutter and cover flashing were required on the splayed end of the roof cladding ensuing a concealed edge and conforming with the eaves flashing, further all cladding troughs covered by flashing were sealed with serrated closers.
.
Challenges:
The design incorporated an asymmetrical roof overhang detail, which was to be clad in timber on the underside, to match the garage doors. AS mentioned above the overhang required a concealed gutter and flashings which had to be custom-fabricated. Furthermore, all flashings on the front side of the structure were custom-fabricated in a slimmer profile than standard, to attain the level of aesthetics required by the client.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 5 September 2018
Completion date of full project 1 March 2019
Tons of structural steel used +/- 4 tons
Structural profiles used 203x133x25 I Beams, 254x146x31 I beams , 356x171x51 I beam and 125x25x2.5 steel purlins
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding 18 October 2018
Cladding profile/ type used 0,55mm C1S Colorplus  “Thunderstorm” Nu-Rib roof, side and gable cladding

 

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 245 sqm/ 840 kg
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Architect MWA Architecture
Structural Engineer Galatis and Associates
Roofing Contractor Vivace Roofing CC
Roofing and cladding supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Main Contractor Prodevcon Construction

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Cuboid 3 Modular POD

The structure is called “CUBOID 3” and is developed to have an alternative accommodation option at the Afriski Mountain Resort in Lesotho. This structure is highly insulation and can also be used anywhere else other than Lesotho

What was the brief to the architect?

The Consort 13 (a group of 4 friends), have requested Eugene Barnard to design a small but comfortable accommodation without a kitchen as the patronne are required to make use of the Resort restaurant. 

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The steel construction was considered from the outset as we needed to uplift the unit and transport it to Lesotho. The exterior Chromadek and rusted steel were considered to reduce future maintenance cost.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The steel construction was designed as follows; 100x100x3 square hollow section as structural columns with sliding adjustable/ extendable legs to accommodate earth levels. 200x75x20x2 lip channel floor and roof ring beams were used which created the width to match the Neopor insulation and the height to accommodate the floor and roof lip channel (100x75x20x2) support structures

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

Charcoal 490 wide Chromadek pans were used in a vertical cladding and the contracting rusted special pattern designed/bent 1,2 cold rolled steel was used alternatively. This was considered in lieu of timber cladding

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Being the first project of this nature to me, it always posed a problem to work underneath or at roof level of the specially built 6700×3200 steel frame. With the help of a friend and landlord, Gerrie van Belk um from Travel tops, we rigged a small overhead crawler beam designed by DNS Consulting Engineers with a Block and Tackle pulley to assist in lifting and moving the steel structures into place. The steel frames had to be bolted together before the cladding could commence. Since completed, the 3 separate sections can now be unbolted and loaded onto a truck to transport

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

We designed this shaped 1.2 cold rolled steel sheet with various heights and widths to imitate timber which was initially considered. We believe we achieved a better-looking finish after we forced the rusting process resulting in low to no maintenance

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All contractors and professionals were carefully selected from past experiences. This eliminated confusion resulting in good communication and deliverables were met

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork May 2018
Completion date of full project Oct 2018
Tons of structural steel used 1.785 tons
Structural profiles used 100x100x3 corner columns, 95x95x5 adjustable corner legs, 200x75x20x2 lipchannel ring beams, 75x50x20x2 roof beams, 100x75x20x2 support columns, 125x75x20x2 floor joist,

125x75x2 rainwater pipes

SA content – if this is an export project All RSA content

 

LSFB / LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work SA Pine infull work
Type of cladding 490 Chromadek Pan cladding 1,2 Cold rolled rusted sheets

OSB board on the interior

 

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding 31 August 2018
Cladding profile/ type used 490 Chromadek Pan cladding 1,2 Cold rolled rusted sheets
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 50 sqm -490 Chromadek pan cladding =0.200 ton 32 sqm – 1.2 Cold rolled steel = 0.434 ton
Cost of cladding 490 Chromadek pans = R 5 360.95

1.2 Cold rolled steel = R 18 346.00

PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator BBa Architects
Client/ Developer Consort 13 partnership
Architect BBa Architects
Structural Engineer DNS Engineers
Main Contractor Zestiblox cc
Steelwork Contractor Geldenhuys Steel
Steel Erector Geldenhuys Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Alltodeck
Cladding Manufacturer Foxgroup
Cladding Contractor Zestiblox cc
Roofing and Cladding Global Roofing Solutions
Site rigger GR Travel tops
Corrosion Protection Paintwork Contractor Geldenhuys Steel

House Oldfield Midlands

The Oldfield family were looking for a weekend getaway in the mountains but not too far from home. A five hectare site was found in Caversham Road, Lidgetton.

Architect’s brief

As the family business was involved in the design and erection of steel structures, the architect was requested utilise as much steel as possible.


Description of the structural framing

All columns and external rafters were fabricated in 200×100 hollow sections to allow them to be used for water evacuation. Rafters were simple 200×100 IPE sections. All steel was hot dip galvanised and painted internally where exposed. Externally all steel was left galvanised

Steel cladding

The architect specified steel side cladding to match the roof with only the gables being constructed in face brick.

Challenges

The most challenging part of the project was the detail in the flashings at the interface of the various elements, windows, doors, brickwork, gutters etc.

Aesthetics

The use of steel allowed for high uninterrupted open spaces in the entertainment area as well as clear external areas.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork February 2018
Completion date of full project June 2018
Tons of structural steel used 20
Structural profiles used Beams, rectangular tube and cold rolled purlins
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding March 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Brownbuilt profile/ Chromadek
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 1000 sq.m
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Cousins Steel International (CSI)
Client/ Developer The Stonehouse Trust
Architect Joy Brazler Architects
Structural Engineer CSI
Engineer CSI
Project Manager CSI
Steelwork Contractor CSI
Steel Erector Kalleb Rigging
Cladding Manufacturer Arcelor Mittal South Africa
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing
Cladding Contractor Kalleb Rigging
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Phoenix Galvanising

Eldo Ridge Estate Residence

The steel structure allowed an opportunity to open the residence up with large glazed areas and contrast the heavy mass of the curved brickwork and sculptural concrete elements. The structure achieves a lightness, transparency and legible simplicity with single pitched roofs, straight lines and clean exposed steel structure maximizing natural light and views. Its deliberate contrast creates a composition of spaces of a different character, complementary to the Client’s lifestyle, which required a balance between privacy and modern outdoor living.

What was the brief to the architect?

The brief was to design a unique & modern residence that could take advantage of the extensive views that existed on the site, without compromising the need for enclosed private spaces where the family could live & work. The strong focus on family living called for the brief to address the inclusion of multiple communal areas, balanced by private areas for the individual. Space, natural light & comfort needed to be included in all aspects of the design.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The roof structure and the support structure as a steel assembly was a major component of the initial concept, fulfilling the brief for light, openness, views, and modernity. The large rafter spans & spacing that is possible with using steel rafters made it possible to install high-level windows in the bedrooms, satisfying the requirement for natural light and privacy. Steel columns supporting a steel roof structure allowed the living areas to be almost completely glazed and substantially openable, blending inside with outside on opportune days with unencumbered views.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

Hollow rectangular sections for exposed roof purlins. Lipped channel sections for concealed roof purlins. I-Sections and H-Sections for support columns, beams, and rafters.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about the fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The challenge on this project was to integrate the strong linear lines and rectilinear forms of the steel structure with the curved organic forms of the brick structures. All of the steelwork was fabricated off-site and then erected on site, which ensured a high degree of accuracy & finish.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

All steelwork was exposed and visible, resulting in the need for all the connections, fixings and joints to be carefully and deliberately detailed. The roof sheeting similarly complemented the main off-shutter concrete roof in form and needed to be installed in a manner that focussed on the neatness of edges and aesthetic appeal.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The Main Contractor was involved very early in the design process, providing valuable insight into the structure and design. The successful collaboration of the Contractor and Consultants from project inception established a harmonious working relationship on site where all were committed and focused on creating a unique & beautiful home.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork July 2016
Completion date of full project September 2017
Tons of structural steel used 10 tons
Structural profiles used I-Sections, Lipped Channels
SA content – if this is an export project n/a
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding November 2016
Cladding profile/ type used Macsteel Arona Roofing Novotexi Roof Sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 550m2
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator SNAPP Architects (Pty) Ltd
Architectural Team SNAPP Architects (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Dippenaar & Lapage (Pty) Ltd
Main Contractor NGA Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor N2 Steelworks
Steel Erector N2 Steelworks
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra – Saflok 700
Cladding Supplier L.R.S. Building Contractors & Suppliers
Cladding Contractor L.R.S. Building Contractors & Suppliers

House Shepherd

The idyllic setting of Monaghan Farm was the main catalyst for this project.  Initially, the house was to be used for weekend getaways, a place to relax and a place for the client’s son to walk around in nature without the barriers of walls and security guards.  Halfway through the project, it became clear that this was a place where the client wanted to live full-time and decided to make this his primary residence.

Brief by the Client to the Architect: The architect brief evolved due to the change of purpose of the property.  Initially, it was to build a modest glass box on the river but then it matured to a full family home.  From an architectural perspective, the client did not want a contemporary modern home, similar to what you see popping up in Sandton and new estates. The desire was to build something that was mid-century modern that had a 60’s feel.  This was difficult for the architect to initially conceptualize, leading the client to reject his initial proposal outright and then sketching a simple structure with a glass box on top and a lower level of two underground wings which he expertly executed.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork June 2018
Completion date of full project December 2018
Tons of structural steel used 35.6 Tons
Structural profiles used 254x146x31 UB; 120x120x6 SHS; 

254x254x73 UC; 100775x20x2.5 CFLC

PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator C-Plan Structural Engineers
Client/ Developer Colin Sheperd
Structural Engineer C-Plan Structural Engineers
Main Contractor Rob Building Construction
Steelwork Contractor Estee Automation
Steel Erector Estee Automation

House 348 Eco

The purpose of the project was to create a single family home within a nature estate with the aim to celebrate steel. The brief to the Architect was to design a double story, single family home to the accommodation requirements of the Estate but to incorporate steel in its many forms as part of the house. The house to be refined and luxurious but have structural steel and steel as a final finishing material.

From inception, the intention of the client was to use steel in the structure as well as a choice finishing product for cladding and privacy screens.

The structural framing was limited to the angled columns and curved roof trusses of the main roof. 245 x 146 I-beam sections forming the angled columns and curved roof rafters were fabricated off site and craned into place.

The choice of cladding was 1,2m x 2,4m x 3mm thick corten flat sheets. The corten with its final rusted finish allowed the steel to fit into the natural environment.

The design opted for hidden fixing and welding of the corten sheets unto the subframe which caused some difficulty. The hidden welding was successfully and innovatively executed. After the exact roof curve was determined the fabrication of the curved trusses did not provide any challenges. The use of steel actually made the process very easy and streamlined.

What makes steel special and innovative in this project is the use of steel as aesthetic and sculptural elements.

From the angled columns supporting the curved main roof to the corten clad box with no visible fixing. This approach created a feel of sophistication.

The Project Team enjoyed this project and all Professionals and Contractors were involved from the concept stage.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork July 2015
Completion date of full project April 2018
Tons of structural steel used 10 Tons
 Structural profiles used 254 X 146 I-BEAM; 50 X 75; 50 X 100; 50 X 25 RECTANGULAR HOLLOW SECTIONS
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding July 2016
Cladding profile/ type used 1,2m X 2,4m X 3mm Thick CORTEN FLAT SHEETS
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 90m²
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Recreate Architects
Client/ Developer Structures 2000
Architect Recreate Architects
Structural Engineer Johan van der Wald
Main Contractor Ebcon Builders
Steelwork Contractor Structures 2000
Steel Erector Structures 2000
Cladding Manufacturer Allied Steelrode
Cladding Supplier Structures 2000
Cladding Contractor Mordt Engineering
If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

House Botha

The purpose of the project was to design and construct a single family home. The Client requested a new double storey, 4 bedroom, 3.5 bathroom family home with a modern and industrial design approach. They enjoy exposed and raw materials as final finishes and was happy to explore any idea within the Estate rules and guidelines.

From the start, the project was envisaged in steel to compliment the client’s appreciation of raw and exposed materials. The main structure of the building was constructed with a steel frame of 254×254 H-sections. The reason for the chosen size was to have the steel frame exposed as the 220mm brick infill walls fit into the sections.

Various other steel sizes included 152×89 I-sections, 152×152 H-sections for sub structure and channel for supporting the metal cladding. For the horizontal and vertical cladding; Klip-Lok 700 was used in continuous rolled sheets. The concealed fixing allowed a low pitch roof and clean façade fixing. Care was taken to have all the cover flashing the same size to create a uniform cladded unit.

The steel frame design didn’t provide any challenges, but the transportation and erection had to be carefully planned as the property is at the end of a cul-de-sac in a well-established residential estate. The steel contractor and erector opted to have bolt-on connections on site which allowed smaller trucks to deliver the individual pieces and build the main structure like a giant Meccano set.

What is special about this project is the honest use of the steel structure and every other building material within the project. Materials are not covered or hidden but complete exposed and integral to the design. The Project Team as a whole was involved and part of all communication once the concept design was approved by the Client. The early adoption of an open communication policy helped in managing the flow of the project.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork May 2015
Completion date of full project June 2018
Tons of structural steel used 22 Tons
Structural profiles used IPE 252×252; IPE 152×175; IPE 152 X 75; IPE  

 

 

152×152; CHANNELS – Various Sizes

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding May 2016
 Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Loc 700
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 450m²
  PROJECT TEAM   COMPANY
Nominator Recreate Architects
Client/ Developer Anton + Daneldi Botha
Architect Recreate Architects
Structural Engineer Les Reeve t/a SRL Design
Main Contractor Recreate Developers
Steelwork Contractor Live Custom Designs
Steel Erector Live Custom Designs
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Roofing and Cladding Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Roofing Options
Cladding Contractor Roofing Options
If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

MacEdwards House Extension

Finding himself pressed for time, Dr S. Albanis from AIS-CE Consulting Engineers, the Engineer of Project Mc Edward’s-House Extension in Midrand Kyalami, evaluated alternative options for a flooring system, i.e. reinforced / prestressed / prefabricated or in-situ concrete.

The main requirements he considered to tackle the looming December crunch in the construction industry, where

  • Structural performance to meet the load criteria
  • Speed of construction / erection
  • Avoid “hidden” later unavoidable time-consuming activities such as screed, structural topping, ceiling, etc.
  • Aesthetics of the final product

At a meeting with Aura Entle, the Deep Flute Floor System was presented to the Engineer.

Aura Entle was delighted upon the announcement by Dr. S. Albanis that the Deep Flute Floor System was selected amongst all other candidate alternatives as it was satisfying the stringent criteria for the assessment.

The Deep Flute Floor System is a floor system characterized by its steel permanent formwork. The steel acts alone to carry the construction loads – without any support within its span.The steel formwork also serves as the mould giving the concrete the shape required of it to act as part of the Engineered floor system.

Significantly less concrete is required in the Deep Flute Floor System – than traditional floor systems -thanks to the steel. As a result, a Deep Flute floor is much lighter than other floors. The Engineer was well pleased with the system as it meant he would not have to redesign his existing walls and foundations to carry additional loads from the slab.

The Deep Flute Floor System does not require the use of any cranes in order to be deployed, and even then the team at Aura Entle was confident that they would deliver the completed 100 square meter floor in under three and a half days of site work.

The folds of steel on the underside of the floor create spacious cavities where services can be placed. The cavities are intentionally kept clear of concrete thus making the services carried out asaccessible for future maintenance and upgrades. Yet another benefit to the Client. The electrician and plumber made use of these spaces to neatly hide away their wires and pipes in the floor.

Finally, armed with the knowledge that the Deep Flute Floor System would not require any props, the Project Engineer saw an opportunity to realize more savings in time, hassle and money. This he would accomplish by taking full advantage of the space available to him on the ground floor – the space that would be free of props. The preparations of the ground slab were run simultaneously with those of the 1st floor slab with the aim of pouring both slabs at the same time. The Engineer’s plan was carried out successfully.

The advantages of the steel formwork floor solution stretched beyond the construction phase. Even though it rained, the kitchen, on top of which was a freshly poured slab, was used by the family on the very day of the pour.

The project represented everything Aura Entle aimed to achieve – delivery on time, within budget and ultimately to see convenience passed down to the Client

Tons of structural steel used 1.53 Tons
Structural profiles used Deep Flute Floor System

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AURA ENTLE
Client/ Developer FTT@580 (Pty)Ltd
Architect KTE Trading Enterprise cc
Structural Engineer AIS_CE Consulting Engineering (Pty)Ltd
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Goldee Trading
Steelwork Contractor AURA ENTLE
Steel Erector AURA ENTLE
Cladding Manufacturer Not provided by nominator
Cladding Supplier Not provided by nominator
Cladding Contractor Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition AURA ENTLE
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.