Ngezi Lounge

When brothers Moses and Selby Mdaka approached Aura Entle to install a floor for their restaurant the team saw the project as an opportunity to carry out its practice of giving opportunity to unemployed youths. The Ngezi Lounge Project is located in the township of Letlhabile, in the North West Province.

South Africa is a country plagued with high levels of unemployment. Residing in it are multitudes of young people who need access to skills development. Aura Entle understands this and attempts to address the problem by decreasing the level of skill required for an inexperienced individual to enter a construction site and make a meaningful contribution.

Aura Entle holds the belief that this can be done by developing technologies that consider the unskilled labourer. With such technologies Aura Entle hopes to deliver projects that would typically be done using heavy machinery and highly trained personnel – with only the help of dedicated workers using simple had-held tools. We believe that this model can be used to deliver high quality projects, and at greater speeds than highly mechanised sites.

The Deep Flute System is a modular floor system characterized by its steel permanent formwork. The Deep Flute is made up of standard light steel components that can be carried and put in place speedily by two people. Simple tools are then used to join everything together to form the complete steel skeleton.

Then steel formwork is designed to carry all the construction loads. The steel also serves as a mould

for the layer of concrete which forms part of the engineered system. For this project the floor was engineered to safely carry 3kN/m2 over 6m long spans.

Aura Entle bravely assigned only two pre-trained workers to the project – with the intention of making up the rest of the team through the involvement of young people from the community. Amo, William and Michael were locally available and eager to get to work.

The trio was introduced to Aura Entle’s team upon our arrival. The team planned to deliver the project in three days – with the concrete pour being completed on the third. Three days was enough to install 100 square meters of flooring area with the pre-trained workers and the young South Africans from the community.

The floor was delivered in the expected time and quality to the joy of the team and to the satisfaction of the Clients.

Tons of structural steel used 1.7 Tons
Structural profiles used Deep Flute Floor System

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AURA ENTLE
Client/ Developer MDK Business Solutions
Architect Not provided by nominator
Structural Engineer Arrow Point Engineering
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor Ostafoghest (Pty)Ltd
Steelwork Contractor AURA ENTLE
Steel Erector AURA ENTLE
Cladding Manufacturer Not provided by nominator
Cladding Supplier Not provided by nominator
Cladding Contractor Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition AURA ENTLE
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Momsen’s Bikes/ Two wheels trading

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The restoration and re-purposing of the historical South End ‘Row Houses’ is to house the new Momsen and Two Wheels Trading head office.  Momsen is the leading mountain bike brand in South Africa and wished to be housed back within the ‘Baakens Valley’ where it all began for them as a brand. The existing ‘Row Houses’ would service the office and retail components with a new warehouse building the rear, serving as the distribution and bulk storage component.

What was the brief to the architect?

The building owner required a design that would retain the essence and rhythm of the historical elements that faced the street.  This needed to inform the design and massing of the warehouse and retail components.  It was important to satisfy all Heritage requirements, yet at the same time create a building that, planning wise, would best serve the tenant, i.e Momsen Bikes and Two Wheels Trading.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes.  The warehouse form and need for free span could only be done best in steel.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The warehouse was broken down into 4 pitched sections to that drew inspiration from the adjacent 4 dominant Row Houses. The warehouse, however, was orientated perpendicular to this so as not to overpower the smaller houses along the street. The warehouse’s main portal structure is formed using I-beam and columns of varying sizes.  Lipped channels then span the portal frame bays.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The structural frame was clad in Saflok sheeting both for the roof and vertical side walling.  The 4 pitches that form the warehouse, although of the same height, varied in depth that further broke the scale of the building down. This posed complexities where the vertical cladding elements as the sheeting needed to seamlessly travel down from the roof into the wall, yet allow for neat flashing and valley gutter detailing.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The only challenge was to translate our Architectural ideas to both the Contractor and Engineer.  Although the warehouse is fairly simple in terms of fabrication it was crucial, through the use of 3D’s, to make sure the contractor and engineer understood the detail between steelwork and cladding elements.  Many additional items, such as cleats, hanging brackets and the like were introduced specifically to allow for easy and interpretation of the cladding which would form the overall aesthetic of the building.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding
in this project?

For DMV Architecture the seed idea was simple. The rhythm of the ‘four’ Row Houses were replicated within the ‘four’ apposing warehouse forms.  These were intentionally a play-off on the number and rhythm of the four houses, yet were positioned perpendicular to them.  It was our opinion that if placed in the same line of the house gables, the warehouse would dominate the residential scale. In placing them juxtaposed, it helped create each owns identity and purpose.  Further to this, the original Row Houses, which terminated in gable ends as part of their vernacular routes, were again juxtaposed and the warehouse adopted a roof that would precede the gable ends opposite to that of the vernacular.  In doing so each one’s identity complimented the other and reinforced their unity.

To the West, the warehouse as a gesture is set back from the boundary to allow the full extent of the first Row House to stand proud as one approaches the building down Upper Valley Road.  This first house retains its original identity by keeping the lean-to to the rear (full extent of original house) and direct access off the street with steps and inter-leading balcony.  With security being an issue within the valley the client naturally wished that no other house is accessed off the street and that the steps be removed so as to reduce the risk of break-ins.  The existing internal floor level is raised from the natural ground level externally so it made sense for the steps to not allow intruders the ability to view inside the new office space.  It was fundamental though to retain the memory of the original steps and main entry to the houses.  It was decided to therefore re-introduce the steps by making use of a thickened plaster to mimic their form in the same plane as the buildings plinth.  The original entry to the balconies were also enclosed but painted, together with the ‘steps’ in a deep grey to further highlight this memory.  To the East the showroom, which too was once an original house, yet detached and not as significant as the Row Houses, was remodelled to take on the same footprint yet in a sheeted contemporary manner with the showrooms framed shop fronts linking back to the houses.  The vertical sheeting also was a play off on the tin sheet cladding of the original.  The gap between the original detached house and fourth Row House was naturally an axis upon which to slide into upon entry and helped establish a break between the internal functioning of the new development, that being office to the Row Houses and Showroom to the detached house.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

For us communication is key. The use of 3D information provided to all role players helped ease the communication flow and reduction in errors and or time delays on site.

Tons of structural steel used 38.6 tons
Structural profiles used I-Beams/Lipped Channels
Cladding profile/ type used Saflok + Corrugated
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Saflok 1309m2 | Corrugated 350m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra
Client/ Developer Gary Erasmus Trust
Architect Dmv Architecture
Structural Engineer Poise Consulting Engineers
Engineer Poise Consulting Engineers
Quantity Surveyor N/A
Project Manager Dmv Architecture
Main Contractor Dave Collins Construction
Steelwork Contractor Uitenhage Super Steel
Steel Erector Uitenhage Super Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Ceiling Master
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Sl Photography
Photographer, Other submitted images Sl Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mintek Gate House Refurbishment

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The purpose of the project was the refurbishment of the Gate House at the Mintek Head office.

What was the brief to the architect?

The architect produced a render of what was required and basic measurements, it was up to SMC to interpret the vision and implement it.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

Due to the unknown, and irregular nature of the brickwork and concrete substrate, steel grillages where designed and manufactured in Mild steel to enable the connection to the main structure but provided the ability to adjust and straighten the building. Accurate light steel panels where then designed to attach to this new straight frame work.

The grillages where welded up out of 100 x 50 x 2.5 angles with base plates out of 100x 8mm plate.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The cladding process involved the installation of the mild steel sub frames, to straighten the building and create the form required by the architect. Light steel frame panels where then installed that provide the connection points for the rivet fixings for the Mineralis cladding Boards

The more complex cladding areas, such as corners, where cut on site after accurate measurements were taken. All installation was as per the Etex installation guidelines

The accuracy required with the installation of Mineralis, provides a first-class final product, but involves complexity to create the accuracy. The challenges involved with this project related mainly to the unknown support work provided by the existing structure. Many load bearing walls where fond to be skins and on-site adaptions had to be made.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

The accuracy provided by Light steel frame design provides the ideal substrate for cladding boards like Mineralis, that require utmost accuracy.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The Fabrication process was relatively straight forward, opposed to the installation portion, that involved quite a lot of searching through the substrate for strong connection points.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The integration of the 3 textures in the project, make for an excellent outcome, Mineralis, Marmoran and stone cladding. The challenge for the contractor/designer point of view was to make the material integration lines neat and accurate.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

Due to the fact that SMC has an in-house design process, the integration of MS design and fabrication drawings with LSF fabrication drawings; communications are streamlined. The client architect contractor team worked well together to create an excellent outcome.

Tons of structural steel used 8t
Structural profiles used 100x50x2.5 RHS and 100 x 8FL
Profiles used  

90mm Framemaster

Type of cladding ETEX – Mineralis; Marmoran, Stone cladding
 Cladding profile/ type used Etex – Mineralis; Fibre Cement & Marmoran
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 482m2

Project Team    

Project Team Role Company
Nominator SMC Africa
Client/ Developer Mintek
Architect PGA Architects
Structural Engineer The Structural Workshop
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor SMC AFRICA
Steelwork Contractor SMC AFRICA
Steel Erector SMC AFRICA
Cladding Manufacturer MARLEY – ETEX
Cladding Supplier MARLEY – ETEX
Cladding Contractor SMC AFRICA
Corrosion Protection Galvanising Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection Paintwork Contractor Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo

competition

Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mercedes Benz J-site Logistics Building

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

In order to reconfigure its processing operations for a new model, Mercedes Benz South Africa (MBSA) is looking to upgrade part of its facility based in East London. One of the upgrade works involves the construction of a new logistics building on J-Site within the East London plant. This project involves the construction of amongst other structures, the following:-

  1. a) J site Logistics building,
  2. b) Gate House to replace the existing
  3. c) Hawker Stalls to replace the existing
  4. d) Dry Link connection between the J Site building and the existing F11 Assembly building
  5. e) Truck Canopy

The client opted for a turnkey contract solution for the project and Stefanutti Stocks were appointed on February 2017.  AECOM were appointed by Stefanutti Stocks as their design consultants.

What was the brief to the architect?

The client’s aimed to construct a new Logistics Building with good accessibility for suppliers and a good connection to Assembly to feed the manufacturing process, with the building footprint maximising all available space on the site. The turnkey contractor was to propose energy saving initiatives which needed to be incorporated into the design.  The principal design philosophy is to provide a structural support arrangement which provides a robust and sustainable structural solution, ensuring the space provided is suitable for its intended use.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The Logistics building is approximately 21 000m2. A gridline system of 28m in the East-West direction and 15m in the North-South direction is used. The Logistics building has a structural steel roof with a slope of 2% (1.2 degree pitch).  Hot rolled IPE purlins are spaced at 3.0m and span 7.5m between the trusses. The trusses span 28m and are supported on girders spanning 15m. The trusses and girders are 2.2m deep and consist of UC’s for the top and bottom cords and double angles for diagonals. A clear height of 10m is allowed for between the floor and underside of the roof trusses. All services are therefore located within the roof cavity. To maximise the usable floor area and ensure flexibility for racking layouts, no vertical bracing was used.  This also ensured that expansion of the building could take place in all directions.  To obtain lateral stability, the concrete columns were used up to 8m above floor level and catladders with a perimeter parapet were provided for maintenance.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The exterior of the new building is largely an aluminium cassette facade to avoid corrosion, with corresponding insulation.  The roof is constructed with 2 layers mineral torch-on plastomeric waterproofing membrane that is each 4.5mm thick on 60mm fibre rock wool insulation board. The board is fixed to Safintra Saflok 700 0,8mm thick steel AZ 150 (inverted) sheets, which are in turn fixed to the purlins.  The non-standard 0,8mm steel Saflok sheet was rolled and load tested at the Safintra premises in Pinetown.  This was required due to both the load and spans being beyond the product catalogue guidelines, as well as the sheeting used in an inverted position to provide almost continuous support to the insulation board.  A complete mock-up of the roof system was built at Safintra’s premises for testing purposes as well as on site for the client’s approval.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Little in the way of fabrication and erection challenges were encountered due to the fact that the concept design involved all parties – steelwork contractor, shop drawing detailer and the steel erection team.  Available sections, lead times, splice positions and section lengths, transport and erection were all discussed and agreed on before final design commenced.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The roof design loads on the Logistics Building include future PV cell installation, the self-weight of the built-up roofing system, technical services and conveyor loading.  This loading is far in excess of the average industrial building loading, resulting in a potentially heavier overall structure. Savings on the steel tonnage was however made by breaking away from the norm in utilising hot-rolled purlins, designing out the requirement for sag bars, and truss and girder connections were fashioned to eliminate the need for gusset plates.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

All design and contracting disciplines on the project worked within an integrated 3D environment. With the ability to interrogate models virtually before breaking ground on-site led to significantly less RFI’s and reduced critical clashes on-site when compared to traditional 2D based project workflows. Consultants generally create design intent models up to about an LODev (Level of Development) 300, on the J-Site Project we were able to run clash detection bi-weekly against the design Revit models using a combination of Autodesk BIM 360 Glue and Autodesk Navisworks software. The once fabrication models were completed by the steel fabricator in Tekla software, we were able to do our final clash detection checks against with models up to LODev 500. At this year’s Daimler Supplier Awards, which recognises Daimler’s suppliers for outstanding performance, Stefanutti Stocks Pty Ltd was recognised for its excellence in the Partnership Category for the Mercedes-Benz Logistics Warehouse and Gate Complex. This is a reflection of the collaboration on the project between all parties.

Tons of structural steel used ±818 tons including Truck Canopy
Structural profiles used Hot rolled open sections, cold formed lipped channels
Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Tufdek Aluminium Cladding, Safintra Saflok 700 steel decking (0,8mm thick) inverted roof sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 23 500m²    35tons (Roof), 8 700m²    155 tons (Side)

This project overview, motivation and technical information was provided by the project nominator. If you were a part of this project and notice that information is incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.


Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AECOM
Client/ Developer Mercedes-Benz South Africa
Architect AECOM
Structural Engineer AECOM
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Stefanutti Stocks
Project Manager AECOM
Main Contractor Not provided by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering
Steel Erector Not provided by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Insimbi Coatings
Photographer, Photo competition Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mediclinic Stellenbosch

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?
Hospital non-combustible material

What was the brief to the architect?
Due to the success of previous mediclinic projects, non-combustible material was required – ultra-span preferred choice.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end? Yes in light steel framing.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc.) and why?
The framing used was ultra-span light gage steel framing. The roof structure consist of a hipped roof structure with Dutch gable ends.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB) the inverted shape of the ultra-span roof trusses opened a new door for design requirements of light steel frame roof structures. With truss spans ranging between 14m and 20m clear spans in ultra-span light steel framing. The total roof area is 4500m2

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The roof trusses were manufactured in Rooftek’s factory and have been transported to site. Portions of the roof structure where assemble on the concrete slab and has been lifted up with a crane into position.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The roof structure was detail to be supported in-between the concrete ring beams on brackets. This created challenges (Design, cost and erecting) with the time frame given to erect the required roof structure.

MiTek Engineering Cape town (Designer Jaco van Wyk) came up the required framing solution that is more cost effective in a variety of fields throughout the project, i.e. The erecting of the roof structure made simpler by assembling portions of the roof structure on the a concrete slab and lifting the required sections into place, reducing cost of the amount of connections of the trusses to the concrete ring beams, opening new opportunity for services (water pipes and electrical cables) to be connected to the concrete ring beams and reducing torsional moments on the concrete ring beams.

The inverted shape roof truss provided a structurally sound roof structure that was designed to accommodate services like a/c units and ducting and Solar PV panels to the one elevation of the roof structures

The special shaped inverted ultra-span roof trusses have drawn attention to architect and engineers. This has opened an opportunity for ultra-span in the western cape especially in the field where non-combustible material must be used

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The project was driven By Kalahari (Rooftek) since the tendering process of the project. All designs aspects and complication of the roof structure was discussed with MiTek, the architect, engineer and project manager on site prior to the final designs to eliminate most of the manufacturing and erecting of the roof structure.

The project management on this project was managed with excellence and all relevant problems that occurred on site, like additional gable gladding details and gable overhangs was resolved in a quick a provisional manner.

Excellent communications via e-mails and site meeting of all parties involved with the require roof structure made the completion of structure a smooth process.

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator MiTek
Client/ Developer Not specified by nominator
Architect TV3
Structural Engineer Smart Structural Solutions
Engineer (Mitek)

Designed & Inspection (MiTek)

MiTek

MiTek

Quantity Surveyor Not specified by nominator
Project Manager Not specified by nominator
Main Contractor Not specified by nominator
Steelwork Contractor Not specified by nominator
Steel Erector Not specified by nominator
Cladding Manufacturer Not specified by nominator
Cladding Supplier Not specified by nominator
Cladding Contractor Not specified by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not specified by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not specified by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition Not specified by nominator
Photographer, Other submitted images Not specified by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Gateway West, Waterfall Kyalami

This is a landmark project, albeit small in tonnage terms. It illustrates what can be achieved using LSF!

The bi-axially curved façade walls give expression to the architect’s design, at a much lower cost than would have been the case had reinforced concrete been used. The rapid assembly and erection shaved weeks off the building programme. It provides a ventilated façade which translates into thermal insulation to the office building interior. The wall panels consist of (from the outside) aluminium cladding (thickness?), ETICS cladding (60 mm thick), vapour permeable membrane (?), 90mm LSF support structure, Cavity Bat insulation (?), Fire Stop gypsum board. Key for the success of the project was the meticulous 3-D design to facilitate integration of the curved LSF framework, the window schedules and the structural concrete.

What makes this project special? LSF allowed the designer to create a unique and striking building exterior, like no other. The insulated LSF walling provides excellent insulation (R-value …..) which will save electricity for heating and cooling over the design life of the building. It was executed at much lower cost than alternatives, and is said to be maintenance free. It is a prominent reminder on the Waterfall skyline of creative designs. A comment received from the USA sums it up – ‘in what galaxy is this building?’

Tons of LSF used 7 ton
Profiles used 90mm C section
Cladding profile/ type used Weber ETICS and 15mm Firestop Gyproc boards
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 1400 sqm

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Ohlhorst LBS Pty Ltd
Client/ Developer Attacq Property Development
Structural Engineer HAGE engineers
Main Contractor Group 5
Steelwork Contractor Ohlhorst LBS Pty Ltd
Steel Erector Ohlhorst LBS Pty Ltd
Cladding

Manufacturer

Quinton
Cladding Supplier Quinton
Cladding Contractor Ohlhorst LBS Pty Ltd
Photographer, Photo

competition

Ohlhorst LBS Pty Ltd

 

Libertas Office Park

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

Design and supply Large Span LGS Trusses.

What was the brief to the architect?

The architect brief the contractor that the trusses needed to have clear span of 17.5m with HVAC services.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The project was originally put on tender for Timber trusses and due to the large span and HVAC services the LGS Ultra Span System was introduced to be a more viable solution and came out to be the more cost effective method.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

the eaves sprockets needed to be mildsteel and by using h-beams  to support the sprockets that is made out of ipe steel beams was used to speed up the process of getting the structure up and to do sheeting before the walls for the beam fill was did.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

Saflok 700 is used for the 5deg roof and the long valley.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

Due to the use of the ultra span sections the trusses weight and ease of erection made it possible to manufacture and erect the trusses without a crane.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The manufactoring of trusses took place on the slab and due to limmited space on site all sections where pre-cut and could be caried in pieces to the slab and manufactured on the slab and lifted to the ringbeam by hand.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The limmited space and using mildsteel members to for the eaves detail made it possible to erect the structure in cost effective and timely why.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The main contractor and ecostrut worked together to make this project a success in all aspect from manufature to the complete erection of the structure.

Tons of structural steel used 5.8 TONS
Structural profiles used H BEAMS, IPE, LIP CHANNELS, ANGLE IRON
Tons of LSF used 10,979 ton
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) 8.44KG/M2
Profiles used ULTRA SPAN
Type of cladding SAFLOK 700 CONCEALED FIX

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Client/ Developer LYNX-RE
Architect SNA architects
Structural Engineer Maxspan
Engineer Dg Consulting Engineers
Quantity Surveyor Matla QS
Project Manager J.C Van der Linde & Venter Projects
Steelwork Contractor Ecostrut
Steel Erector Ecostrut
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra
Cladding Supplier Safintra
Cladding Contractor Ecostrut

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Kusile power station: absorber strakes: specialised fabrication and transportation

NATURE OF PROJECT

The purpose of the project was to decrease “Time to Site” as well as “Time on Site” as well as to ease onsite erection and improve quality of fabrication by manufacturing the Absorber Strakes to be installed at Kusile Power Station in the largest possible assemblies.The largest components to be moved were 120o segments of a 20m diameter, 9m high, circular absorber tower section, fabricated from 14mm steel plate.

The following considerations came into play when determining the feasibility of the “Large Assembly Transport”:

POSITIVE CONSIDERATIONS

Conditions inside the fabrication workshop at Genrec are controllable and assembly could take place without interference from the elements.Quality control is easier, and automated welding methods could be used.Time to/on site (read SITE COSTS) was drastically reduced.

NEGATIVE CONSIDERATIONS

Bespoke transport cradles, as well as lifting equipment would have to be designed and fabricated. This was mainly due to the flimsy nature of the 120o segmentsDue to the highly specialised nature of the design, specialist design expertise would have to be outsourced.It was decided that the positives outweighed the negatives and LSL Consulting Engineers were appointed to design the lifting and transportation equipment.

DESIGN PROCESS

Since the absorber towers are not constant in diameter, some sections were reducer sections and some were smaller sections. Therefore, a “one size fits all” system could not be used. All in all 4 different lifting arrangements and transportation cradles were used.However, due to a design process involving people from management right down to the factory floor, it was possible to design the different cradles and lifting beams in such a way that they could be disassembled and modified to suit the specific requirements of the particular component to be moved. Thus the same cradle components could be re-used.

As far as possible, standard hot-rolled structural sections were used (I-beams and H-profiles) due to ease of availability. Specialised spreader beams were however required to carry out the “top-and-tail” operations required to rotate the absorber segments from a vertical manufacturing position, to a horizontal transportation position. The spreader beams were manufactured using bespoke box girders due to considerations of lifting capacity.The most interesting” part of the process was that the spreader beams, as well as the lifting beams which clamped onto the shells, had to be positioned in such a way that the Centre of Gravity of each shell would act as the rotational pivot point.

FABRICATION & TRANSPORTATION

Fabrication of the cradles were done partly in-house and partly outsourced, and transportation and transport co-ordination was outsourced to a specialist contractor.

Tons of structural steel used 309
Structural profiles used Box Girders, I-beams, H-sections

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator GENREC
Client/ Developer GE (at time of project)
Structural Engineer LSL Consulting
Engineering Manager GENREC
Main Contractor GENREC
Steelwork Contractor Burger & Company
Steelwork Contractor Nessa Engineering
Steelwork Contractor One Steel

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

JRA Gantry

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

Designed to be a traffic intersection regulator.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The gantry consisted of only circular hollow sections from the main frame and bracing to the support columns.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

All the connections on the CHS had to be profiled and the girder section had to be pre-cambered. Fabrication had to allow for safe transportation as the sections were abnormal loads delivered in Johannesburg CBD. Assembly of the bridge had to be carried out in an allocated area in close proximity to the site, in order to minimise road closure time. Once the main gantry was assembled it was moved into place with a truck and dolly and the erection began in the allocated 1 day road closure.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

Traffic was cordoned off for about 6 hours to allow the tandem lift of the bridge into its final position. Pre assembly was done approximately 1Km away from the actual site. This intersection is highly populated and carries heavy traffic during the day. The project will aid in reducing intersection confusion due to lack of robots and appointed personal to direct traffic. 

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

Like a well-oiled machine – Close coordination between MPW Steel construction, JRA and JMPD was essential to ensure the erection process was completed in a safe and efficient manner. Traffic was diverted around the designated area between Empire road and Clarendon.

Tons of structural steel used 19.4 TONS
Structural profiles used ONLY CHS

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator MPW STEEL CONSTRUCTION
Client/ Developer JOHANNESBURG ROAD AGENCY
Structural Engineer JG AFRIKA
Main Contractor MPW STEEL CONSTRUCTION
Steelwork Contractor MPW STEEL CONSTRUCTION
Steel Erector MPW STEEL CONSTRUCTION
Photographer, Photo competition MPW STEEL CONSTRUCTION

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Inoxa Manufacturing Facility

The Inoxa Manufacturing Facility project came about due to an international crockery manufacturer’s desire to open a manufacturing facility in South Africa. The facility manufactures products for the South African market, as well as for export.The client for this project was Shree Property Holdings (SPH), who developed the property for lease to Inoxa Manufacturing.

From the start of the project, SPH consulted with both Davgo and Steelkon Projects to find the most suitable structural steel solution for the specific site and client requirements. The tenant required a linear manufacturing process and product flow, which led us to the current design of a 50 metre wide by 350 metre long building.

The building is divided into 3 distinct zones, each with it’s own characteristics in terms of steel structure.The first zone is the Manufacturing Zone, which measures 50m by 143m. This zone comprises two 25ton overhead crane gantries, each with a span of 23m, both of which run the full 143m. The crane rail height is at 9.2m above FFL, and hence the eaves height is at

11.5 above FFL, to accommodate the gantry cranes. Lattice type columns were designed for this zone so as to mitigate against the horizontal deflections caused by forces induced by the cranes onto the rails. The crane beams were designed as compound members comprising I-section beams with parallel flanged channel section caps.

The second zone is the Polishing Zone, which an extent of 50m by 71.5m. Here the manufactured products are cleaned and polished before proceeding to packaging. This process requires ample headroom and the most uninterrupted floor space economically possible. For these reasons, the eaves height of 11.5 was retained, and a centrally located lattice transfer girder was designed to span 3 bays (18.5m), which meant only 2 internal columns were used over the entire 2,600sq.m footprint of the Polishing Zone.

The third zone is the Warehouse Zone, which an extent of 50m x 136m. This is where the finished products undergo QC, before being packaged, and then stored whilst they await distribution. Since the tenant did not require high level racking, the eaves height for this zone was reduced to 9m above FFL. The same roof design as the Polishing Zone was used to keep internal columns to a minimum.

Added to the main building, a semi-detached office structure was also designed and supplied to suit the tenant’s needs. The office structure comprised a suspended slab and roof, with floor area of both floors totaling 5,000sq.m. This was originally supposed to be designed as a concrete framed structure with a steel roof, however due to the tight time constraints the development faced, it was decided to rather use a steel framed structure to support the pre-stressed concrete T-beams & topping slab. The main load carrying beams had to be deep I-sections since the spans varied between 7.5m and 9m. These were compositely tied to the slab by means of Y12 shear connector bars.

The office roof also used a lattice transfer girder in the centre of the 35m span width, resulting in only 4 internal columns over the 2,500sq.m footprint.The steelwork and cladding portions of the job were completed on time and without any problematic incidents, mainly due to the meticulous design, detailing, and planning of the steelwork with one of the main objectives being to minimize the complexity of the rigging. One of the challenges faced was the interaction between the rigging of steelwork and the rigging of pre-cast concrete panels, since the latter required steel members to be temporarily removed so as to allow the concrete panels to be installed and plumbed with ease.

The end result of this project is a landmark building on the KZN North coast, which is both functional and aesthetically pleasing externally and internally. When standing inside the structure, one is not only struck by the pleasing geometry, vast uncluttered space, and striking yellow paintwork; but also by the beautifully detailed lattice columns and girders which create curious geometrical shapes as you move around within the building.

A very satisfied client also adds to the prestige of being involved with this project.

Tons of structural steel used 500 tonnes
Structural profiles used I-sections, H-sections, Angles, CHS, Crane Rails, CRLC
Cladding profile/ type used IBR 686 Colourplus AZ150
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage Approx. 20,000 sq.m

Project Team 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator DAVGO Steel Construction
Client/ Developer Shree Property Holdings
Architect Zadar Studio
Structural Engineer Steelkon Projects
Main Contractor Shree Property Holdings
Steelwork Contractor DAVGO Steel Construction
Steel Erector DAVGO Steel Construction
Cladding

Manufacturer

Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Future Steel
Cladding Contractor DAVGO Steel Construction

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.