House Wolhurter

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

New Residence.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes it was, the client was familiar with the system and previous project.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

Frame cad Light Steel Frame section 40 x 90mm C-Channel.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)
Shera Shiplap Wood Grain Plank.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

All wall’s, Trussed and Roof panels were constructed from Light steel frame.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

It was a standard house design, however site access posed some challenges due to excessive rain.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

It was a standard light steel frame building system with Shiplap cladding.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The client supplied Shospec with drawings from the recommended architect who is familiar with light steel frame construction.

Once the design was completed and ready, Shospec took over the complete project, from Earthworks to the final completion of the home ready for occupation including the driveways etc.

The client put their full trust in our team to run and implement and complete the project with minimal involvement from any other parties.

Communication was great and mostly done electronically with minimal site meetings required.

Tons of LSF used ± 8.4 TONS
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) LONGEST TRUSS = 7.4 M
Profiles used 0.8mm PLATE BENT TO CHANNEL.
Type of cladding SHERA PLANK TEAK WOOD GRAIN.
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage ± 250 M²

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator SHOSPEC (PTY) LTD
Client/ Developer PRIVATE
Architect EQUILIBRIUM ARCHITECTURAL SOLUTIONS CC
Structural Engineer MARTIN & ASSOCIATES
Quantity Surveyor SHOSPEC (PTY) LTD
Project Manager SHOSPEC (PTY) LTD
Main Contractor SHOSPEC (PTY) LTD
Steel Erector SHOSPEC (PTY) LTD
Cladding Manufacturer / WALLS SHERA & CAPCO
Cladding Supplier / ROOF SAFRINTA
Cladding Contractor FOUR SEASONS INDUSTRIAL ROOFING (PTY) LTD
Photographer, Other submitted

images

SHOSPEC (PTY) LTD

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

House Matthews

In 2014 Colin Matthews, owner of Mercury Steel construction, had a vision to build his dream home in Helderfontein Estate, Fourways on the Jukskei river banks. The majority of the home was designed to reflect his passion for steel, both structurally and aesthetically.

Mercury Steel was a reputable company doing most of its steel work for Century Property Developments for the last 20 years, with a turnover of R25m a year in the residential market. They’ve won awards in galvanised steel construction and been a pillar in the design and execution of many Century buildings within their developments.

Sadly, Colin passed away in January 2017 leaving the house with only the structural steel skeleton complete. Richard Wands and Jessica Hofmeyr, who owned the neighbouring stand, purchased the stand with completed structure from the deceased estate and selected Century Property Developments to complete the house in honour of Colin Matthews.

The brief to the architect was to ensure that steel remains the dominant element in the design, creating strong features yet also a light quality due to the slabs and walls sitting within the webs of the I beams. Externally, the use of steel is dominant and aggressive, with massive beams and columns. In the interior, steel is forever present, but subtle and discreet where the beams form part of the floor finish, the soffit and the walls. Steel enables a lean design and removes the obstructiveness of large brick / concrete columns and beams, which would otherwise be required for all the large openings. The steel allows natural light to enter the house and exposes the home’s magnificent view.

Structurally, the house consists of 3 floors and the structural frame was designed and built mainly with 254×146 x 37kg horizontal I Beams to carry the middle and upper level exposed concrete suspended slabs. The larger beams enable the suspended slabs to sit perfectly in the web of the steel beams. 152 x 152 x 37kg vertical H Columns allow the brickwork to be flush and the windows to sit neatly within.

The roof structure’s top frame is constructed with 203 x 133 x 25kg I beams with the rafters being steel IPE 160 sections. Purlins consisted of 150 x 65 x 20 x 2.5 CFLC sections tying the structure together.

Cantilevered balconies are supported by 160x80x3 RHS columns running down the front of the house on an angle, creating a top-heavy cantilevered look, with the house seemingly on stilts.

The gables and the garages were cladded with Safintra Trimflute Sheeting. The requirement for the cladding to sit flush with the 254 I Beam steel outer flange meant we had to use a 140mm cement brick to allow for spacing, and the battens needed 20mm square tubing.

From the driveway to the bottom floor the site has a 7m fall, making access extremely difficult. Steel sections had to be placed by a crane sitting on the top level. The steel frame ensured that the building was plumb and square, which then made setting out walls and levelling slabs etc. easy to achieve. Ensuring that services all ran in the concrete slab and into the walls – without seeing any of the conduits – was a challenge and holes had to be drilled through all the internal horizontal beams to allow for water, gas and electrical piping. These areas had to be strengthened with structural fins within the steel web. Outer walls had to be built with the outer brick laid flat and the inner brick on edge, to ensure that the plaster didn’t protrude beyond the steel internally. This resulted in a clean finish, with the edges of the I beam flanges being flush with the plaster.

Regular meetings were required early on to mitigate challenging details which could not be foreseen in the planning stage. The Contractor, Engineer and Architect were constantly involved to ensure that the building could function structurally and aesthetically without compromising the look of the steel or any other part of the house.

A challenging project indeed, but very rewarding and evident in the final product.

Thank you for considering the possibilities that steel in a domestic setting offers, both structurally and with very pleasing aesthetics.

Tons of structural steel used 21.396 Tonne
Structural profiles used I – 254x146x37 / I – 203x133x25 / H – 152x152x37 / Ipe 160 / Cflc 150x65x20x2.5 / Rhs 160x80x3

 

Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Trimflute – Colour Thunderstorm
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 208m2 / 1.04 TONNE

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Century Property Development
Client/ Developer N/A
Architect Studious Architects
Structural Engineer C-Plan Structural Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Engineer C-Plan Structural Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Quantity Surveyor Century Property Development
Project Manager Century Property Development
Main Contractor Century Property Development
Steelwork Contractor Wrought Iron Factory
Steel Erector Wrought Iron Factory
Cladding Manufacturer Safintra (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Safintra (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Nico Grobler Dakoprigting
Photographer, Photo competition Nextgen Group (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images Nextgen Group (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

House Eagle Heights

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The steel trusses of the roof was designed to enhance the aesthetics of the building, bringing in softer lines. The roofs themselves are broken up, to mitigate the massive bulk of the building and to accentuate the various space within. The roof is not only experienced from the outside, but also from inside, where the steel trusses makes it possible for the ceiling to sit flush with the steel, without additional cross bracing or support.

What was the brief to the architect?

The majestic house rises up from a beautiful portion of land with views in all directions. The soft curves of the building as well as the material palette allows the building to gracefully blend into its surroundings. In order to ‘fit in’ the extensive accommodation list the client presented us with, we had to utilise a basement, stretching almost the entire footprint of the stand, to accommodate some of the exciting features of this residence.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The steel was the most obvious solution for the roof in particular from the start

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The trusses are made up of I-beams, some curved and welded in the middle to form the apex of the roof. The purlins are lipped channels. The columns are mainly round steel columns to support the upper level slabs, and bridge.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

To create the curved roof, non standard truss design had to be employed. The trusses were made up specifically, with each of the roofs that have a slightly different span.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The project manager ensured that the team was fully informed and worked well together. Additional specialists eg. roof sheet specialists were consulted from the start, to ensure that the project could be executed as planned.

Tons of structural steel used +- 6 ton
Structural profiles used Chanels, Lipped Chanels, I-Beams
Cladding profile/ type used ZincAlume Kliplock 700 Sheet
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 560sqm (includes roof sheeting)

Project Team 

Nominator Strey Architects and Associates (Pty) Ltd
Architect Strey Architects and Associates (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer PVA Consulting Engineers cc
Project Manager Earthstone Properties
Main Contractor Earthstone Properties
Steelwork Contractor Gert Visser Staalwerke
Steel Erector Gert Visser Staalwerke
Photographer, Photo competition Strey Architects and Associates (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images Strey Architects and Associates (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hirt and Carter

Hirt and Carter is an industrial building / office space that consists of a shared printing facility and head office in KwaZulu-Natal.

Initially, the client was looking for a project site where they could build their new office and factory component. Over the course of the design stage with the architect, the tenant of the building realised they would require a substantially larger building to accommodate the amalgamation of different printing companies under one roof. The final design included a factory component that consists of 45 000m2 and an office of 5000m2.

The factory was moulded with an off-centred curved barrel shape spanning 290m along the profile and 598m along the front. Steel was the construction material of choice to achieve the spans required for the design.

The design team came up with a design that encapsulated an economical factory design with large cantilevering canopies that are elegantly tied into the factory façade. The steel sizing and structural capabilities of the design fit seamlessly with the aesthetics that the architects set out to achieve. The design showcases a lightweight truss system with the factory component displaying a simple white box touching a concrete shelled office space that showcases CHS steel columns that playfully hold up the wings while spanning the main entrance within a steel bridge and stair design. I-beams of different sizes were used along with circular hollow sections, which adds to the playful look and feel of the office structure. Square hollow sections were used at the main entrance of the structure.

Global Roofing Solutions’ Kliplock system was used to clad the building. This system was used in conjunction with hardwood timber packers as spacers to allow for 40mm insulation within the factory. The office component houses extruding concrete framed meeting pod boxes that have SHS steel supports hidden within the glazing edge trim to give the feeling of structural feeling.

The design of the factory required massive roof spans that minimise the height of the structure and steel usage within the truss build ups over the long lengths. The large overhanging canopies were designed to elegantly touch the factory component, creating a functional covered space outside over the external hardstand.

The process on site was restricted due to two back edge boundary lines and required careful consideration to achieve a workable and practical solution. The professional team worked closely together from the start and they workshopped various forms to derive a collaborated proposal. Prior to construction, the contractor joined the design team so that all of the options to clad the massive spans could be properly explored and planned for.

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Client/ Developer Tisco Blackstar
Architect Elphick Proome
Main Contractor Stefanutti Stocks
Steelwork Contractor Avellini Bros
Steel Erector Impact engineering
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Impact engineering

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Heineken Warehouse

What is the purpose of the structure / project?

The approximate 18 800m2 of warehouse area was constructed to provide the client with additional storage capacity for finished product due to increase demand and new logistics strategy implemented by the client.

What was the brief to the architect?

Expansion of the existing warehousing and supporting infrastructure to accommodate market growth and centralise logistic facilities for more cost effective and efficient operations. The project had to be completed in record time (5 months) as the client intended not to renew current rental agreements for existing warehousing, and the new warehousing had to be in operation before the client’s peak sales period over the December holidays.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The warehousing was initially envisaged by the client as imported tent structures cladded with canvas due to financial considerations. The professional team however showed that new predominant steel structure warehousing with IBR cladding built in similarly configuration to the existing predominant concrete structure warehousing proofed more cost effective and more suitable to the client’s environment and needs. Various reinforced concrete components of the existing warehousing were replaced with light weight structural steel components in the new warehousing, which resulted in significant functional and aesthetic improvements and at least 30% savings in building costs. 

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

After careful design considerations, the structural engineer identified opportunities to further optimize the new structural members by deviating from the heavy original structure which had been designed for European snow loads.  As a result hot rolled I-sections were used instead of cellular beams.  The original concrete box gutters were also replaced with steel girders and gutters in order to reduce cost and increase the speed of construction.  This demonstrated the versatility of structural steel as a construction material. The steel also provided the benefit of acceleration by not having to endure a curing period before the structural members could be loaded.

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The cladding was specified as 0.58mm thick IBR Chromadek Z200 to suite existing warehouses. The cladding was supported by standard galvanized cold formed steel sections.

Give a brief description of the Light Steel Frame Building element of the project. (Notable features/ achievements made possible by LSFB)

Although the new optimized design showed an approximate 30% saving in weight, no light weight steel members (aluminium) were used on the project.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The construction programme necessitated the complete construction of the 18 800m2 warehouse inclusive of concrete raft foundations in a period of 5 months with 3 partial completion dates for sections of the construction.  This resulted in an extremely tight schedule for manufacturing and erection of the steel. Space frame steel trusses were constructed as cantilever canopies over loading bays. Overhead steel beams were used to increase span lengths between supports and subsequently reduce the number of internal steel columns to optimise floor stacking area. Historically concrete beams were used to support roof structures and box gutters, which were replaced with light weight steel girders in the new warehousing.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding  in this project?

Light weight structural steel components replaced historic reinforced concrete elements resulting in more efficient and cost effective warehousing. Space framed steel truss canopies is more functional and aesthetically pleasing. Steel girders were also used in lieu of the original concrete box gutters.  Circular hollow sections were used for the loading bay canopies to compliment the warehouse aesthetically and also proved to be the most effective structural members that could accommodate the excessive cantilever requirements (12.5m).  Steel was also ordered early based upon workshop approval of certain components in order to speed up delivery and manufacturing.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The 5 months construction period was initially considered unrealistic with inherent risks to all parties involved. The new warehousing was however completed on time and within budget, which proofed to be a huge success. This achievement is attributed to the pro-active solution driven approach adopted by all team members from the start of the project.  Good governance, management, site control, communication, support and cooperation between all team members ensured that challenges were resolved timeously. 

Tons of structural steel used 692 tons
Structural profiles used Various I-Sections, PFC Channels, Equal Angles, CFLC and Circular Hollow Sections (CHS)
Cladding profile/ type used 0.58mm IBR Chromadek Z200 roof sheeting and cladding
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 27 135m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Heineken South Africa
Architect Designdex Architect
Structural Engineer ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Engineer ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Quantity Surveyor ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Project Manager ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Main Contractor AVENG Grinaker LTA
Steelwork Contractor BOKSAN Projects CC
Steel Erector BOKSAN Projects CC
Cladding Manufacturer Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
BOKSAN Projects CC
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
BOKSAN Projects CC
Photographer, Photo competition ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
Photographer, Other submitted images ESABA Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd
  Fowlds Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Corruseal Warehouse

The 135 000m2 site is situated in Croydon in Cape Town and is bounded by the R102, the Eerste River, the railway line bordering Stellenbosch and the Steyne Road.  The Corruseal Group propose to construct a world class facility for the manufacture of corrugated cardboard for local industries.  Their requirement was a factory/warehouse of approximately 30 000m2 and associated offices of approximately 500m2 on two levels.  The factory/warehouse was to have a width of at least 150m and was to allow for future extension.  The eaves height was to be at least 6,5m.

The first challenge was to determine the overall shape of the structure.  It is this engineer’s opinion that the basic format of the structure should be determined by the engineer to achieve the most economical and efficient building.  Due to the overall size of the building, the most efficient roof structure was determined to be a barrel vault.  A double pitched roof would have resulted in an unnecessarily high apex with concomitant high gables and a significant increase in the quantity of steelwork and sheeting.  Costs of services too would have increased.  Valley gutters were not considered to be an option because of the potential for roof leaks.  A distinct advantage of the barrel vaulted roof is that when the slope is very flat rainfall runoff is negligible, but when the runoff is at its maximum, the slope is at its steepest.

An extremely large radius of 600m was selected for the curve of the roof for aesthetic as well as functional reasons to limit the height of the crown of the roof to reasonable proportions.  Natural lighting was introduced through the use of monitors which also enhanced the general aesthetics of the structure.  Secret fix Klip-tite sheeting was selected for its slightly deeper profile and its advanced clipping system.  Sheeting was kept to manageable lengths by dividing the curve into three approximately equal sections, with the middle sheet raised by 80mmto avoid a butt joint at the crown where slopes were extremely flat.

The curve of the roof made the use of cellular beams an obvious choice because of the ease of introducing a radius to the rafters.  Cellular rafters were selected also for their aesthetic appeal and their elegant proportions.

The second challenge was to determine column centres which would accommodate Corruseal’s large manufacturing plant, operating system and warehousing requirements.  Through a process of trial and error, the optimum grid for the structure was 6,75m in both directions.  Columns were fixed at 20.25mx13.5m centres with the curved cellular rafters spanning the 20,25m dimension and transverse parallel chord girders spanning 13,5m.  The overall size of the building (centre line to centre line) was set at 162x162m.

The structure was initially designed using steel columns.  However when it came to determining where to locate internal vertical bracing, every position selected clashed with  Corruseal’s operation and reinforced concrete columns were the only alternative.  This decision led to the columns being precast which helped to reduce the overall duration of the project.

For functional and aesthetic reasons cantilever rafters were introduced at the eaves.  This will ensure that rainwater will be discharged away from the sides of the building in the unlikely event that the gutters will be overtopped.  The cantilevers would obviate the truncated appearance on the sides if they were left off.

Detailing of the steelwork was achieved using Tekla software which ensured that only a few minor issues had to be dealt with on site.

Tons of structural steel used 596 TONS
Structural profiles used CURVED CELLULAR BEAMS & STRUCTURAL SECTIONS
 Cladding profile/ type used KLIPTITE 700 AZ 200 ZINCALUME 0.53
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 30000m²

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Macsteeel Service Centre SA
Client/ Developer Corruseal Group
Architect  
Structural Engineer Alan McNaughton & Associates
Main Contractor JNM Construction
Steelwork Contractor 1 Avellini Bros (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor 2 Union Steel
Steel Erector Union Steel
Cladding Manufacturer Blue Scope Steel
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Cornubia Mall

Cornubia Shopping Mall is an 85 000 m² regional shopping centre that offers a mix of food, fashion, lifestyle and sports, which are all integrated into an outdoor family-orientated shopping experience in KwaZulu-Natal. The brief to the architect was to create a differentiated shopping and leisure experience that would resinate with people in the region.

The shopping centre is an open-air development with various nodes that all have their own unique design elements and architectural language. The surrounding landscape and natural elements have been incorporated into the design and the various nodes are connected through sidewalks, bridges, landscaped walkways and park-like open areas where visitors can connect and relax. Moving through the walkways, pedestrians are shielded from nearby traffic through elevated walkways and parks that are surrounded by vegetation. The luscious leafy ring of landscaping creates a feeling of calm and relaxation for families and visitors. It has also achieved the goal of creating a recreational retail experience for shoppers.Sustainability was an important goal for the developers and the centre has achieved an environmental merit certification for its use of recycled rubber, one of the world’s most hazardous waste streams, in the manufacture of roof coping tiles equating to 6250 cubic meters of rubber not reaching landfill.The majority of the development was constructed with brick masonry with a steel roof and canopies. The structural profiles of the shopping mall include I-Beams, channel, cold rolled and angle profiles. 1300 tons of structural steel was used for the roof and Global Roofing Solutions supplied 72000m2 of Klip-Tite for the project.

Social transformation was another key goal of the project. During the course of design and construction, 1100 people received access to work readiness programmes that will help them obtain permanent employment and 2500 people received temporary jobs.The end result is a new regional shopping centre that creates a pleasurable experience for visitors and also achieves a triple bottom line for the developers. The social impact, economic measurables and sustainability goals has helped the centre achieve a balance of ecology community, financial feasibility to ensure that the development will of benefit to current and future generations.

Tons of structural steel used 1300 tons
Structural profiles used I-Beams, Channel, cold rolled , Angles
Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite, IBR 686
Cladding area/ coverage 72000m2
Cladding tonnage 408Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer Investec Property Group
Architect Bental Ass
Structural Engineer Pure Consulting
Engineer CKR Consulting engineers
Main Contractor Wilson Bayly Homes
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon
Steel Erector Cadcon
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

City Logistics Ceiling

Purpose of the structure/project?

The structure was designed and installed as a ceiling to bring the existing facility into spec as a functioning ESFR (Early Suppression Fast Response) warehouse. Due to the new tenant’s requirements to store tyres, the ESFR system requires the sprinklers at a precise height above the stored product, and consequently a ceiling within a specified ASIB range thereafter to optimise early warning parameters from smoke and heat.

Due to the underside of sheet being too high in approximately 8,800sqm of the warehouse, and the existing steelwork not being able to cope with the new sprinkler loads, the only option was to strengthen the existing steelwork insitu and thereafter provide a ceiling at the required height.

What was the brief to the architect?

To get the existing facility, recently vacated by the Mr Price group into spec for the new tenant, Goodyear.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in the end?

Not necessarily. There were investigations into using traditional ceiling boards and droppers. It was deemed due to the sprinkler weight that truss and girder strengthening was required in either regard, and the subsequent steel roof would be lighter and quicker. The entire project was on a compact and tricky program with significant pressure from the tenant for occupation dates.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used and why?

Hot-rolled: Angles, tubes, and plate.
Cold-rolled: 300mm purlin section and 302 Metsec Z-sections

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation)

All structural steel and cladding was retrofitted to the existing (strengthening) and new (ceiling) steelwork from inside the warehouse, off cherry pickers and scissor lifts. Due to the installation limitations and material handling the sheets were delivered in 4m lengths, as before, all off scissor lifts. Cladding had to span across 78m, in-between sprinkler droppers, lights, electrical cable trays, and at times in-between the existing lattice trusses.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication from the engineer’s design. Tell more about fabrication and erection process if difficult, complex, innovative

Large steel plates to carry the Metsec sections were cumbersome and difficult to install. Wind bracing and box sections (made from 300mm purlins) were installed above the existing truss beneath the existing roof. These were 11.2m in length and had to be lifted off access machines to over 13m and installed in highly restrictive conditions.

What is special/unusual/innovative/aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The steelwork was used to both strengthen the existing structure and provide a solution to the client/tenant’s need to successfully achieve the desired result and make this facility unique and superior to both parties.

How did the project team work together (contractor involved early, challenges, ease of communication)

Excellent. With numerous contractors on site working weekends, night shifts, and in confined areas the project team worked exceptionally well under improbable timelines.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Tons of structural steel used 110 tonnes
Structural profiles used Z – Sections, Angles, Plates
CLADDING
Cladding profile/ type used 0.50 IBR 686 Zincal AZ150
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 8800m2

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Cousins Steel International
Client/ Developer City Logistics
Architect RHA
Structural Engineer Sotiralis Consulting Engineering
Engineer Cousins Steel International
Quantity Surveyor Quantil
Project Manager Quantil
Main Contractor Cousins Steel International
Steelwork Contractor Cousins Steel International
Steel Erector Cousins Steel International
Cladding Manufacturer SAFAL
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA
Cladding Contractor Cousins Steel International
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Cousins Steel International
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Cousins Steel International
Photographer, Photo competition Cousins Steel International

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Gibela New Manufacturing Facility – Dunnotar

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

A +-50 000m² industrial facility designed for the manufacturing of 580 trains for PRASA (Passenger Rail Association of South Africa). Most of the structures need to accommodate overhead cranes ranging from 2t to 2x10t tandem cranes.

What was the brief to the architect?

Design a facility to include the entire process from the extrusion of the raw steel, assembly of the coach, electrical wiring and internal fitting, filming, static testing and through to the final dynamic testing of the completed train. Also to be included is a training facility.

 Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Mostly yes. There were several iterations of the design to value engineer the buildings. The initial gable structure were concrete, but later changed to steel to speedup construction and reduce the size of the foundations.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams, etc.) and why?

The main frame of the buildings consists of both lattice columns and I-Columns at 8 meter grid spacing. The roof consists of steel trusses made up of angle sections. Purlins and girts consists of Metsec profiles. Metsec purlin and side rail systems are manufactured from higher strength steel, with minimum yield strength of 390 MPa in comparison to the common and local Z and C sections, which generally have yield strength in the order of 200 MPa. This allows for larger purlin and girt spacing and an overall lighter structure. The Gate House roof consists of curved cellular beams. This was mostly and architectural feature because it’s the main entrance to the site.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Some roof spans were more than 29 meters. This meant splicing of trusses for ease of erection. The erection process were quite conventional. It was a challenge to obtain the correct curvature for the Curved Cellular Beams at entrance building.

 What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

One of the buildings has a 12.5 meter cantilever canopy, with a gutter on the edge, spanning over a 10x48m hardstand which would be used as a laydown area. The client required a clean working space below to ease the movement of vehicles.

 How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

The engineer communicated directly with the steel fabricator to finalise fabrication drawings. The contractor was copied in all communication and witnessed the meetings. The engineer shared the 3D Revit models and hard copies (serving as the master files) with the fabricator to ease in the translation to Tekla structural steel. The fabricator also shared his Tekla 3D model as supporting documents with his set of fabrication drawings. This all in an effort to speed up the approval process.

Tons of structural steel used 2396
Structural profiles used Curved Cellular Beams

Metsec Purlins

Hot rolled sections

Cladding profile/ type used 0.55mm Saflok 700 profile (roof)

0.55mm Trimflute profile (vertical/ side)

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 77 352m

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator AECOM
Client/ Developer Gibela
Architect AECOM
Structural Engineer AECOM
Engineer AECOM
Quantity Surveyor AECOM
Project Manager AECOM
Main Contractor Trencon
Steelwork Contractor 1 Churchyard and Umpleby
Steelwork Contractor 2 Churchyard and Umpleby
Steel Erector Louwill Lefa
Cladding Manufacturer Powersteel (Louwill Lefa)
Cladding Supplier Global Roof Solutions (GRS)
Cladding Contractor Global Roof Solutions (GRS)
Photographer, Photo competition AECOM

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hoopstad WestFert Fertilizers

Fertilizer company Westfert required a massive warehouse to take advantage of favourable global conditions in the market. The large-scale dome in Hoopstad that was built is described as the biggest in the southern hemisphere. The main objective of the structure was to create an inland fertilizer storage facility where various basic granular fertilizers can be blended and bagged for the specific needs of farmers. The structure is 116 meters wide and 152.25 meters in length and covers approximately two hectares.

There are no supporting pillars within the structure, which creates enough space for two Airbus 380s to fit inside the building. A triangular pipe frame structure was use for the trusses. A single 194mm diameter bottom cord pipe and two 140mm diameter pipes were used as top sections. The bracing is 76mm pipe and all the sections are 3mm thick.

Creating a structure of this scale wasn’t without its challenges, says project engineer Hentie Park. One of the main challenges was to ensure that all the trusses were rolled on a 96m radius. Secondly, all the welded connections were profiled with a CNC plasma cutter to ensure exact fit. Each truss consisted of 10 sections that were joined by specialised welding on site. Articulating joints were designed where the truss connected to the concrete plinth. Two halves of the trusses were lifted by two 25ton cranes and the centres were connected with three pins – one for each cord. The latter reduced the election time and costs significantly.

 The unsupported span of this building is 116m. Global Roofing Solutions supplied approximately +-27000m2 of Klip-Tite and NuRib for the product and 127m long sheets were rolled on site and clipped into positionThe dome is the fourth largest such structure in the world and it will be able to house approximately 200 000 tons of fertilizer.  Thanks to the new dome warehouse, Westfert will now be able to buy input ingredients such as urea in bulk when exchange rates and prices are at their most favourable.

Cladding profile/ type used KlipTite & NuRib
Cladding area/ coverage +-27000m2
Cladding tonnage +-160 Tons

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions
Client/ Developer West Fertilizers
Structural Engineer Alliance Con Systems
Project Manager Alliance Con Systems
Main Contractor Alliance Conveying Systems
Steelwork Contractor Vic Engineering
Steel Erector Vic Engineering
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Alliance Conveying Systems

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.