The Viper Elevated Woodland Walkway

A comprehensive and very accurate 3-D cloud survey of all the trees and their branches in the forest was done, so that the route of the walkway could be designed    and refined to meander through the wood without a single tree being affected

Since disturbance of the tree roots was also to be kept to a minimum, conventional concrete bases were not an option and the structure is thus supported on steel piles driven into the ground, with positions carefully chosen so as to miss all roots.

Each column is fixed onto a tripod, with  its three ends each supported on a pile. After installation the pile top positions were accurately surveyed again, and the tripods all manufacture to exact, bespoke dimensions, so that each column base would be in precisely the correct position and at the correct level, ready for the column to be fixed onto it.

SUPERSTRUCTURE STRUCTURAL CONCEPT

Since no diagonal members are allowed in the UK above deck level (to prevent climbing over the handrail), the handrails could not be used as the upper chord of a truss, as we have done on previous structures. The main structural members are thus all below the deck level, comprising a central box section plus two side box sections, with the stanchion ribs above not forming part of the main structure and thus designed as delicately as possible, only 15 mm wide at the top. All the box sections are welded up from plates profile cut to  the correct curves.

The central box is joined to the two outer box sections with diagonal ribs that are angled on plan, so at to provide horizontal stiffness.

The shapes of the stanchion ribs and the lower ribs have a continuous, even outer curve that flows  from the handrail all the way around to the central box section. The stanchion and lower rib  inner edge curve is also continuous until it becomes horizontal in the centre. The outer box sections have vertical sides but the top and bottom surfaces are sloped to follow the curved lines of the stanchions and ribs.

The superstructure was built in 3 sections: the central main box section with the lower ribs welded to it, and the left and the right balustrade sections. All components were made up in lengths of roughly 5 m, so that they could easily be lifted into their  final positions on site with a light crane.

Everything was pre-assembled in the workshop, then galvanised and painted, so that it would fit perfectly when bolted together on site, with only minor paint touch-ups required.

The Oak timber joists, Balau transverse decking slats and the Oak handrails were also pre- fabricated in sections, before being fitted in their exact positions on site.

COLUMNS

The columns are up to 11 meters long, and have to resist substantial moments at their bases. They also need to be stiff to reduce the horizontal walkway deflections. They are star shaped in plan, made of 6 radial T sections. They taper from a 265 mm diameter below the walkway to a diameter of up to 460 mm where they are bolted onto the tripod top plates.

An interesting detail was devised for this connection, to allow for any possible angular orientation between the column and the tripod. This was achieved by having 12 slotted holes in the column baseplate and 24 round holes in the tripod top plate. As the column is rotated around the common centre point (which also has a bolt for initial erection purposes, 12 bolts will always fit through the 2 plates.

The columns were made up in sections of max 6 m long and the detail where these sections are bolted together is also interesting, with no protrusion of the flange plates beyond the column edges and the bolts hidden between the T-sections.

COLLABORATION

The Architect and Structural Engineer have worked very closely together to sculpt all the details of the walkway deck and its supporting structure, to ensure that that every component is tidy and aesthetically optimal.

Furthermore, the entire walkway and all the columns were fabricated by a Cape Town steel fabricator before being shipped to the UK, achieving a considerable saving for our Client. A UK steel contractor fabricated the tripods supporting the columns and did the onsite erection of all the steelwork. The close collaboration achieved between the consultants and contractors in Cape Town and those in the UK has been one of the highlights of the project.

INTERESTING FACTS AND NUMBERS

Total length                           130 m

Width                                    1.4 m for most of the bridge, 3 m in one zone

No of spans                          12

No of columns                       12

Typical span length                10 m Max height above ground    12 m

Steel mass of bridge             31 tonnes Steel mass of columns 14 tonnes Steel mass of tripods 12 tonnes

Nearly all the steelwork was CNC plasma cut from plates and welded together

CONCLUSION

We feel that the Viper Walkway at Emily is an excellent example of how steel can be used to create something of amazing and enduring beauty. The facility is bound to provide a lot of pleasure to many people for a long time to come. Steel is a material with very special attributes and qualities, no matter where it is fabricated or where it is erected.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Project Team Role

Company

Nominator

Henry Fagan & Partners

Client/ Developer

Emily Estate (UK) Ltd

Architect

Mark Thomas Architects

Structural Engineer

Henry Fagan & Partners

Quantity Surveyor RSA

Bernard James & Partners

Quantity Surveyor UK

Synergy

Project Manager

Stonewood Design Architects

Main Contractor

Beard

Steelwork Contractor  RSA

Prokon Services

Steelwork Contractor  UK

MJ Patch & Co

Steel Erector   UK

MJ Patch & Co

Timber Work Contractor

HG Holliday (Pty) Ltd

Corrosion Protection
Consultant

KVB Associates

Corrosion Protection
Galvanising

Advanced Galvanising 

Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor

MRH 

Photographer: competition

fotohaus

Photographer: other images

Henry Fagan & Partners

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Sol Plaatje University Student Resource Centre

In 2014, Sol Plaatje University [SPU] opened its doors as the first new University in South Africa’s democratic era. Strategically close to the Square Kilometre Array Telescope [SKA], its initial intake of 135 students is expected to grow to 7 500 within its first 10 years.

Located in Kimberley’s Inner City, a progressive Urban Design Framework seamlessly incorporates existing civic, public and education stock with new purpose-built University buildings, positioning tertiary education as an integrated part of Inner City life. Perhaps it’s heart.

Designworkshop was successful in a two-stage architectural competition towards conceptualising and delivering a Student Resource Centre as the functional and physical centrepiece of University life, including library, teaching, study, and social space.  The key question we explored was what this emerging typology could optimally be and enable in the South African reality of a globally integrated world.

Ancient images of knowledge-sharing are of people gathered around elders, thought- leaders and gurus, in Public Space. Depending on where and when, this could be by the side of a river, under a tree, in a public square or on a street-side. This is learning and knowledge generation in a social setting. Within society and indistinguishable from it, learning is enabled by the practical and perceived reality of life as it’s experienced, often on a platform of traditional cultural practice.

When information was recorded in writing, the emblematic image of learning is often the quiet study table surrounded by books. This is the dissemination of accumulated knowledge, most commonly recorded outside of the direct experience and as a more linear and one-directional transmission abstract from specific cultural settings. The ‘neutrality’ of science.

The SPU Library and Resource Center integrates both, at the same time. It’s a social place where people make themselves available to wide-ranging incidental and planned interchange in the course of daily life, both in physical space and online, with and without books, collectively and in solitude, directed and enabled by mentors or among themselves.It is at the same time a tree, the side of a river, a public square, and a street.

Centred on a raked public forum, the ground floor is an extension of Kimberley’s pavements, paths, squares and gardens. It’s a public space sheltered from the cyclical hot and cold extremes of the arid climate.

Ascending from public to private, each additional floor is another ‘public square’ accessed from its perimeter to enable 3-dimensional exploration of a continuous knowledge-scape.

Solid grass-reinforced moulded mud forms typify South Africa’s interior vernacular brakdak construction. The Library scales this heritage up into a 22cm thick freestanding concrete shell rising up to 36m high and lifted off the ground to reveal a single hollowed-out volume ascending upward to its highest point overlooking University Square.

The inverse of Kimberley’s iconic Big Hole diamond mine, the building is a distinctive sculptured object, arising from the endless horizontality like a koppie, brakdak house, or mine shaft. In a single material, concrete is structure, enclosure, climatic attenuator, flexible use-enabler, extended tradition, and noble experience.

In everyday university life, the building is a refuge, a 24 hour winter lounge and summer verandah.  In a world of scarce resources, it is highly energy efficient, allowing in the right amount of natural light with significantly mitigated heat-gain or loss, the internal temperature further moderated by hot and cold water pipes embedded into concrete floors.

In the City, it’s a landmark of democratic learning, social and cultural exchange, and a generator of economic potential which always comes from empowered knowledge and ideas

Engineering description derived from structural report done by AURECON

This seven storey building project forms part of the new Sol Plaatje University central campus precinct, a multipurpose media centre and library, envisaged as the signature building on campus.

Structural Engineer Interview:

The structural steelwork related engineering consists of the following aspects :

1.An external continuous concrete envelope that encapsulates the whole building, that is primarily free-standing. Ranging to heights of between 12m and 30m above ground level and only 220mm thick. This concrete envelope is raised 2,4 m off the ground level with eccentric steel stilt supports.

2.The two lift structures comprise a structural steel frame, independent of the lateral stability.

3.The building frame does not obtain its lateral stability from a conventional uninterrupted RC shear wall system or lift core structures, but rather through a combination of:

a. Sway-frame action from the flat-slab and columns accounts for 50% of lateral stability system in both directions above level 1.

b. North-south shear wall action by the western façade wall down to level 1 and transferred through diaphragm action through the floor plate to the back of house shear wall grouping.

c. East-west strut-and-tie action via the two multi-story transfer trusses down to level 1 and then transferred through diaphragm action through the floor plate to the in- plan eccentrically located back of house shear wall grouping that is offset by a steel A-brace to the north elevation façade wall.

4.Hanging concrete staircases to the west façade wall elevation with special tension ties, embedded key boxes and coupler connections to provide support from the façade wall interface due to no column supports.

5.Internal steel staircases hanging from roof beams via hot-rolled steel elements.

6.Structural Steel Sub-frame to Curtain Wall.

Additional information about the use of steel in the building

Although the primary mass of the building consists of a concrete shell, it was always envisaged that this would need to be supported by steel to allow the mass to float lightly and enable visual connectivity from the ground floor to the campus on all four sides.  Throughout the structural design of the building, steel was used to contrast against the heaviness of the concrete shell and enable almost impossible transfer of structural loads and bracing across the void between the floor plates and the shell to the ground. The attached images show these drak painted steel props, columns and A-frame braces.  Likewise the eccentric load of the external concrete stairs are hung from the external envelope and structure behind with very light steel elements.  Internally the vertical circulation located in the void consists of steel suspended staircases and steel framed lift shafts with steel mesh cladding.

Contract Director Interview:

The design of the connections between the concrete and steel were complex and highly detailed to ensure the bonding of the concrete to the steel cast-in items.  To maximise the feeling of lightness the steel sizes had to be limited and the detailing and implementation of the welds was therefore very critical.  There was a great level of co-ordination between the steel and the concrete during the construction of the building.  It was a highly collaborative process between the professional team and the contractors to enable optimum resolution of technical aspects as well as implementational challenges.  In turn the contractor had a strong relationship with the steel manufacturer and installer, with whom they had previously worked.  All contracts were undertaken under the NEC suite.

Site Manager Interview:

In addition to the structural steelwork the project uses customised expanded metal panels for sun-shading to the large opening on the north façade as well as to the courtyard roof; the pitch of the openings being carefully worked out to provide solar protection as well as optimum day-lighting.  Expanded mesh was also used to clad large [5,4m high] bespoke steel framed acoustic in-filled sliding doors to provide flexible arrangements around the in-formal auditorium as well as smaller scaled privacy and acoustic screens in the flexible study areas. 

Architect Interview:

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork Around May 2017 [Structural Steel]
Completion date of full project December 2017
Structural profiles used UC H-SECTION CHS PFC DETAN RODS  
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Designworkshop
Client/ Developer Sol Plaatje University
Architect Designworkshop
Structural Engineer Aurecon
Quantity Surveyor KDM
Project Manager Aecom
Main Contractor M&D
Steelwork Contractor Mawele Metal Works
Steel Erector Mawele Metal Works
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Mawele Metal Works to advise
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Mawele Metal Works to advise

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

New School – Diamandshoogte & Boshof Primary School

The purpose of the structures supplied was exclusively for roofing trusses as well as side cladding. The architect was instructed to design in order to give a bit of a different aesthetic appeal to the schools towards the standard look of most other schools

Initially wood was considered for the project, however, after consulting with the project team they changed their view of what can be done with Light Steel Frame, clad with Klip-Lok Colourplus/ Chromadek® sheeting.

Furthermore, the much lighter roofs reduced the loading on the supporting structure, especially on the walkways. We were also able to do a low pitch, long span truss, for a much more cost effective price than other materials like wood.

We used a C-section; G550 – LSF section to manufacture the trusses, with a Zincalume coating as well as Zincalume top hat 40 & 20 sections for the roof and ceiling battens. The roof sheeting was done with Klip-Tite, Dark Dolphin sheeting.

There were no real challenges on the manufacturing side, as all the trusses were only varying in length for the different buildings.

LSF was however chosen due to the speed & accuracy of manufacturing that was able to be maintained as most of the schools were build more or less the same time, by different contractors, but had to receive their roofs at more or less the same time.

The design of the side cladding and finishing there were the key factors in giving the project a different but very pleasing aesthetical look.

We were already approached at the design stage to verify that the plans and ideas of the professional team will be able to be executed, which made communication during the project a lot easier as all parties knew what was expected and what the final look that the architect envisioned looked like. There were therefore minimal practical challenges on site.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

LSFB /  LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work Nov 2018
Completion date of full project Jan 2019
Tons of LSF used 84,169 ton
Span of trusses and Kg/m2 (if applicable) 4.9  kg/sq.m including Top hat 40 & Th 20 Ceiling batten
Profiles used  Frame master 89 x 39 x 12
Type of cladding Klip-Tite

CLADDING

 

Completion date of cladding

Okt 2018

Cladding profile/ type used

GRS Klip-Tite, Chromadek®

Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage

17132sq.meter

Coil Manufacturer

ArcelorMittal South Africa

PROJECT TEAM

COMPANY

Nominator

Siteform

Client

DBSA

Principal Consultant & Project Managers

WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd

Architect

Cube Architects

Light Weight Steel Engineer

Thusabatho Consulting

Steelwork Contractor

Siteform

Quantity Surveyor

DPD

Main Contractor

Sedtrade Sky Construction

Cladding Manufacturer

Global Roofing Solutions

Cladding Contractor

Siteform

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

New Pedestrian Bridge at Erasmusrand on National Route 1

The original bridge in Erasmusrand, Pretoria was damaged in January 2015 and demolished by SANRAL during June 2016. SANRAL appointed the LEO-Superstructures Joint Venture for the design of a replacement bridge. The bridge spans across the 10-lane dual carriageway freeway providing access to the Waterkloof High School to the east from the suburbs to the west thereof.

The client required a replacement pedestrian bridge that spans across the freeway without a median support and fulfilling all vertical and horizontal clearance requirements. The bridge could be a concrete, steel or composite steel/concrete structure, similar in cost to the previous bridge. Aesthetics of the replacement bridge was an important consideration. The client required 5 conceptual designs which could be evaluated in terms of aesthetics, costs, maintenance requirements, constructability and traffic disruption and overall clearance.

Initially, the arch, being primarily a compression member, was envisaged to consist of precast concrete elements. The excessive weight associated with a concrete arch made transport and erection unfeasible and thereby a lighter steel solution was adopted.

The structure consists of a fixed steel arch supporting a composite steel/concrete deck with inclined square hollow steel struts between the arch and the deck. The deck merge with the arch at the crown thereby reducing the structural depth to a minimum. The arch consists of a stiffened closed steel plated box which transitions to an open trough filled with concrete over the crown.

Handling of the huge assembly was a major challenge during construction. Further challenges included manufacturing the curved members with inclined faces merging together which resulted in complicated geometry. Welding in confined areas in the box also proved challenging.

The structure was lift into position in two sections. The mere size of the assemblies complicated the erection. High precision erection was required to obtain a perfect fit with small tolerances. The main challenge was to place the second section. In order to get the base of the arch over the holding down bolts, the section had to be lifted inclined and then rotated in place afterwards. The abutment posed a geometric constraint which required that the end piece of the deck had to be installed and welded after the arch had been erected.

A full-strength site weld was required to join the arch at the median temporary support. The open trough section used in the arch minimised the welding and allowed that all welding could be performed from the top instead of all round.

The intention was to design a structure with an optimum structural form for the opening to be bridged. The aesthetic appeal lies in the slenderness of the structure which could be obtained through its structural functionality. The structural depth was reduced to a minimum over the crown by merging the deck into the arch. A balustrade with a high degree of transparency was chosen to accentuate the slenderness of the bridge. The sides of the arch and deck was sloped in opposite directions which introduced a separation line highlighting the outline of the arch and the deck.

The rise to span ratio of 0.07 is at the lower end of the feasible range for arches of this magnitude. With the low rise to span ratio the arch becomes susceptible to buckling and the effect of displacements becomes significant requiring third order large displacement stability calculations.  The design was balanced to achieve both an acceptable stability factor of safety and a high level of material utilization.

Due to the slenderness and optimum use of material, the potential exists for dynamic excitation to occur through rhythmic footfall loading. To avoid using Tuned Massed Dampers the stiffness and the mass of the structure was manipulated to reduce accelerations within acceptable limits.

Stability of the structure during erection was a critical aspect that required close collaboration between the design engineer and contractor. Each construction stage and each handling and transport process had to be analysed to ensure stability is maintained throughout. An innovative solution was developed to ensure stability as well as to limit displacements by temporarily stressing each segment with tie bars. The stressing was released after the arch had been closed thereby locking in the beneficial effect of the pre-loading forces on the permanent structure.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 15/4/2019
Completion date of full project 31/5/2019
Tons of structural steel used 105 Tons
Structural profiles used Combination of Platework and Tubular
SA content – if this is an export project 100% Local
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Cadcon (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer SANRAL
Structural Engineer Superstructures
Engineer LEO Consulting
Quantity Surveyor LEO Consulting
Project Manager LEO Consulting
Main Contractor Teichmann Ndungane
Steelwork Contractor CADCON
Steel Erector On Par
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
DRAM Industrial Painting Contractors

Sishen Modular Plant Expansion Project

The purpose of the Project was to satisfy process enhancement requirements. The Pre-Expansion Modular Ultra High-Density Medium Separation (UHDMS) Iron Ore Plant that was in operation at Sishen Mine could only process ~3.60 Mt/a of the JIG Plant discard.

The Expansion Project was launched to investigate the expansion of the existing Modular UHDMS facility (a Previous PBA Projects Project) to treat the entire JIG discard stream of ~6.95 Mt/a.

The PBA Projects scope for the Modular Plant Expansion included the addition of Screening, Degrit, Lump UHDMS, and Process Water Modules. For the Expansion Project, new material handling conveyors and civils were designed by Thyssenkrupp with detailing and site implementation by Stefannuti Stocks.

What was the brief to the architect Engineer/Contractor

The brief was focused on the process enhancements that were required by Sishen Mine. The solution which PBA Projects engineered accomplished this with innovative modular designed solutions that overcame a short time-line, site footprint space constraints, and integration into an operational mine to minimise downtime.

Engineer interview:

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

The project was always envisaged in steel. All the treatment plant structures that are designed by PBA Projects are designed and built from steel. Steel is utilised as it fits well into the modular design approach from the perspective of time-saving and transportability.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The Structures were fabricated from S355JR Steel sections in accordance with the Red book’s hot rolled steel sections. A variety of steel section sizes were used inclusive of but not limited to: 203x133x25 UB, 254x146x31 UB, 406x178x54 UB,305x165x40UB, 152x152x23 UC, 70x70x6L, 90x90x6L, 80x80x6L,100x100x10L, 120x120x8L, 180×70 PFC, 200×75 PFC, 114.3x6CHS, 139.7x6CHS.

The flooring on the modules is steel grating and the hand railing is from commercial grade steel pipe.

The structures are designed to withstand Ultimate Limit State & Serviceability Limit State design criteria in terms of SANS 10162-1. The structure’s designs also need to incorporate strategic splits for process, modular and transport purposes. Each of the modules is transportable by truck and thus designed to withstand such criteria. Each of the modules is lifted onto and off trucks and is required to withstand lifting analyses.

As a complete structure (assembly of modules) the structures are designed to withstand the effects of vibrating equipment, with variable material loading within bins and various platework items on the plants. The platework items are designed from 350WA steel which is rubber or steel lined where required.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell?

The one challenge from a modular perspective was that the screening equipment on the Primary screening module was so large that it didn’t allow for this module to be pre-assembled and transported, as assembled sections, as the other modules were. This module had subsections that were pre-assembled for ease of erection but required more on-site building.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The Modular design by PBA Projects allowed the mine to continue to be fully operational while the new modules were designed, fabricated, transported and erected, minimising downtime during implementation.

The new Modules were required to integrate with the existing plant in intricate brownfields interfaces which was achieved seamlessly. For this, the full plant was 3D modelled to ensure the seamless integration.

The Modules were designed, fabricated and water tested in Cape Town, minimising project on-site assembly costs and time.

The Modules were designed to be transportable via truck from Cape Town to Kathu in the Northern Cape, ready to be stacked and bolted together, ensuring rapid site establishment and minimum on-site labour.

The Modules, incorporating vibrating equipment, were designed as low tuned structures, to minimise the mass of steel utilised in design.

How did the project team work together (e.g. contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)?

The Project team excelled as this was an in-house project, with all disciplines and aspects including:

  • Process design,
  • Electrical and Control Requirements,
  • Equipment manufacture & procurement,
  • Structural design and Fabrication
  • Transportation
  • Site support &
  • Commissioning

were all completed by the PBA Group of Companies, ensuring seamless integration and design quality and continuity throughout all aspects of the Project.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork Modular Completion in Cape Town, March 2018
Completion date of full project Commissioning Completion at Sishen, November 2018
Tons of structural steel used 205 Tons (Purely structural columns, beams and braces)
Structural profiles used Main members: 203x133x25 UB, 254x146x31 UB, 406x178x54 UB,305x165x40UB, 152x152x23 UC, 70x70x6L, 90x90x6L, 80x80x6L,100x100x10L, 120x120x8L, 180×70 PFC, 200×75 PFC, 114.3x6CHS, 139.7x6CHS
OTHER STEELWORK
Flooring Galvanised Steel Grating (Rectagrid – RS40, 30×4.5, Non-Slip, Galv) – Allowed 1.25m kick flat per 1m2.Flooring (Vastrap, 8/6, Excluding Galv or Paint)Stairtreads (Non-Slip, Sidemount with No Bullnose, Galv)
m2 of Flooring used from 1. 1503m283m2253 units
Handrailing Steel (Ball Type, Handrail and Kneerail)
Linear meters of handrailing used 1014m
Material Holding Platework items-structurally designed Platework items that were welded together and painted & lined where applicable  
Tons of Platework 126 Tons
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator PBA Projects
Client/ Developer Sishen Iron Ore
Structural Engineer PBA Projects
Project Manager PBA Projects
Main Contractor PBA Projects
Steelwork Contractor PBA Engineering
Steel Erector- in Cape Town PBA Engineering
Steel Erector- on site at Sishen Stefanutti Stocks
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Galvatech
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Galvatech

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hope & Light School

The purpose of the structures supplied was exclusively for Roofing trusses as well as side cladding. The architect was instructed to design in order to give a bit of a different aesthetic appeal to the schools towards the standard look of most other schools


Why steel?


Initially wood was considered for the project, however, after consulting with the project team they changed their view of what can be done with Light Steel Frame, clad with Klip-Lok Colourplus/ Chromadek® sheeting.

Furthermore the much lighter roofs reduced the loading on the supporting structure, especially on the walk ways. We were also able to do a low pitch, long span truss, for a much more cost effective price than other materials like wood.

We used a C-section; G550 – LSF section to manufacture the trusses, with a Zincalume coating as well as Zincalume top hat 40 & 20 sections for the roof and ceiling battens. The roof sheeting was done with Klip-Tite, Dark Dolphin sheeting.

There were no real challenges on the manufacturing side, as all the trusses were only varying in length for the different buildings.

LSF was however chosen due to the speed & accuracy of manufacturing that was able to be maintained as most of the schools were build more or less the same time, by different contractors, but had to receive their roofs at more or less the same time.

The design of the side cladding and finishing there were the key factors in giving the project a different but very pleasing aesthetical look.

We were already approached at the design stage to verify that the plans and ideas of the professional team will be able to be executed, which made communication during the project a lot easier as all parties knew what was expected and what the final look that the architect envisioned looked like. There were therefore minimal practical challenges on site.

LSFB /  LIGHT STEEL FRAME BUILDING WORK
Completion date of LSFB work Jan 2019
Completion date of full project End of April
Profiles used Frame master 89 x 39 x 12
Type of cladding Fibre Cement Boards – UFCC

CLADDING

Completion date of cladding

End of March

Cladding profile/ type used

UFCC Fibre Cement Board

Klip-Lok Colourplus/ Chromadek®

Coil Manufacturer

ArcelorMittal South Africa

PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Siteform
Architect BV Argitekte
Structural Engineer By DESIGN Structural Engineering
Main Contractor Inyathi Infra (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Siteform
Cladding Manufacturer UFCC
Cladding Contractor Siteform

Cummins Johannesburg Relocation Program Waterfall

What makes the Cummins project unique from a structural perspective, specifically the structural steel design is the intricacies linked to the architectural aesthetics of the manufacturing facility. The brief was to design a manufacturing and assembly facility with multiple workshops and testing centers, which would from the outside not look that way. This is by no means a standard mechanical engineering, testing, and assembly facility, as the clean curved lines give the building a sophisticated yet functional envelope.

Engineers Motivation:

The steel design had to suit the architect’s vision, whilst keeping the structure light and within budget.  Behind all the curved sweeping lines is a steel structure made up of large span girder trusses supporting trusses in the opposite direction. The trusses are all made up of angle sections of varying sizes which form the truss chords and lacing members. This allows for a light and economic design, easy to transport and assemble on site, also allowing for the installation of solar panels over the entire roof area. Inside the facility, all services such as fire protection, electrical cable trays, and lights are suspended from the roof structure. There is a separate gantry crane steel structure inside the warehouse, suspended on top of reinforced concrete columns, which allows three gantry cranes to services about 75% of the floor area inside the facility. This is for the numerous operations taking place on floor level such as servicing and assembly of large engines and generators.

All offices inside the facility have lightweight steel structure designed to support low-level ceiling and services

Steelwork Contractor Interview:

As steel contractors, we were challenged on this project from the very beginning stages. This was no regular warehouse. The workshop drawings were very complex. Having to detail the steel facades with different levels, different elevations, Cladding stepping in and out, raised monitors, cantilever “Pop-Out” Monitors.

Once all of this was modelled using Tekla Structures, The fabrication had to begin. With the extremely tight program required by the client we had to produce the steelwork in record time but at the same time give the highest attention to our quality.

Erection on site is something to give special commendation to. To implement what the architect envisioned, to accomplish what the engineer required, and to do this in the time that the client needed was a feat to accomplish.

As the structure was a combination of concrete and steel much effort was needed to ensure that the steel facades are installed straight, level and with the correct steps in the façade to give the perfect final picture once cladded.

The main roof structure also required much attention, with the raised centre portion creating the roof monitor allowing for ventilation and natural light.

Inside are crane gantries that sit on Concrete Columns. Here we had a challenge to hand over the crane beams to the correct tolerances required by steel construction and crane beam specifications, as concrete tolerances are far larger that these. But with good detailing and accurate installation, this was accomplished to client satisfaction!

As Ferro Eleganza we are very proud to have been part of the team that constructed one of the Flagship and most attractive Warehouses next to the N1 Highway!

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork November 2018
Completion date of full project December 2018
Tons of structural steel used 258 Tons
Structural profiles used H/R sections / C/R Lipped channel
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
IPS Industrial Painting Services
Cladding and Roofing Global Roofing Solutions

Comair Simulator 3 Building

The client requested a space/building to accommodate the training facility for pilots. This building should also have all the necessary rooms and additional services to support the facility. Training halls, lecture rooms, and the brief and de-briefing rooms were part of this complex. In this facility, the pilots are getting training in the theory and practical aspects.

What was the brief to the architect?

The client’s brief was to provide a building, housing two mobile training units, and two static training units with their supporting rooms around and close by. The provision of lecturing rooms, a computer room, board rooms, a cafeteria, and open plan offices was included in the brief. The building should fit in with the other existing buildings on the site and also designed to allow the maximum natural light into the main core of the building.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes, the original design was definitely in steel. The flexibility of steel was the only answer to the curved structure of the building. The curved outline of the building simulates the hull form of an aeroplane. The curved spaces inside the building allow for the correct height in the centre of the building to accommodate the total envelope of the simulators to move freely in all directions. Both sides the building is lower to host the training rooms and other service rooms to support the operation of the simulators.

Steelwork contractor interview:

The roof structure consists of a few steel portal frames. These frames are curved trellis trusses, about 900mm deep. The space between the roof sheets and the curved ceiling was used for services like HVAC, Electrical trays, fire detection, IT cables and data lines. The ceiling follows the curved trusses and consists of different layers of material to achieve the necessary insolation towards the control of the heat gain and also for sound absorption. The ceiling is a suspended ceiling with stainless steel, 20×20 mm mentis grid, then a 40mm thick black cineplex insulation batting with fibre cement ceiling boards on top of that and then fixed to the underside of the curved trellis trusses.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about the fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

Yes, due to the size of the steel portal frame it had to be manufactured in four parts to ease the transport and also the erection of the frames. The rolling of the roof sheets was very difficult and a complexed operation.  The rolling of the sheets was done on site and had to be 100% accurate to follow the curve of the steel frame.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The brown built roof sheets followed the curved steel trusses and were also extended along the curved structure downwards to form at the time the wall cladding. The roof sheets rapped the building to enhance the feeling of an aeroplane. 

As Ferro Eleganza having built all the previous buildings (Except for building 1) it was a great privilege to be part of this project once again.

The iconic curved buildings housing the Com Air Flight simulators have become a landmark known by all across the R21 from OR Tambo International airport.

These beautifully shaped buildings based on the shape of a large aircraft could only have been done by the use of steel. 

The structure consists of curved CHS pipe lattice trusses and lipped channel sheeting support rails. Where the structure is closed with ceilings the truss sections are made out of Hot Rolled angle sections in order to save costs for the client. Once the steel becomes exposed again it changes back to CHS pipes.

Both gable ends of the building are complete glass and steel facades. Comprising of Shaped “Plate Girder Fins” and Large RHS members between carrying the glass. Here much effort was required as no bolts were allowed at the connections so as to keep the look and not to clash with the glass.

This was accomplished by using locating lugs inside the sections and then careful site welding and polishing to create the required finish and look.

The erection of this building was a great challenge in its self.

Due to the curved shape of the trusses and the fact that they are only connected to the concrete bases with a single Pin on both ends these trusses cannot stand on their own.

Therefore the entire truss was assembled on the ground and then using two mobile cranes the first two trusses were lifted into position and then held there while the bracing and purlins were installed so that the structure could stand on its own.

Another challenge has always been the link tunnels between the buildings. These are narrow tunnels that give the idea of the tail end of the aeroplane.

 Here the curved pipes needed to be rolled at much smaller radiuses and much effort was needed to ensure that the steel structure could receive the curved sheeting.

To crank the sheeting to the correct radius and then fit it to the steel structure required much effort and the combined efforts of Steel and Sheeting Contractor together.

It was a great challenge to create what the architect envisioned, to accomplish what the Engineer required, and produce this beautiful building that could only have been done with steel.

The roof super-structure radiated from the internal circular ring beam to the oval-shape external ring beam using a combination of gusseted rafters for the shorter spans to I beam/angle-iron type trusses for the longer sections.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork June 2018
Completion date of full project September 2018
Tons of structural steel used 70 Tons
Structural profiles used CHS, H/R Sections, C/R Lipped Channel
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Industrial Painting Services (Pty) Ltd
Cladding and Roofing Global Roofing Solutions
Architects WMS Architects

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Wisium SA (Pty) Ltd – Relocation and extension of Mixing Plant in Brits Industrial

In the difficult financial climate that we as South Africans find ourselves, this is a brilliant example of how steel can innovatively be used to assist the growth of a company while keeping the costs much lower than expected.

Imagine a redundant feed plant standing in Pretoria West on Epol Dog Foods Plant. They have this 80t Tower Feed Mill Building which is no longer in use. On the other hand, you have Wisium SA an Animal Nutrition company who needs to build a state of the art new plant to accommodate their growth. Can you imagine buying a building in Pretoria West and bringing it to Brits? Well with Steel this was made possible!

Ferro Eleganza was appointed and given this exciting challange. But dismantling a building that was decades old was no easy task and safety was a huge concern for us. We began by removing all roof and then side cladding with its insulation. This was carefully done with cherrie pickers and mobile cranes to enable safe working. All steel members were then marked with item numbers according to a general arrangement to enable re-assembly later. Then according to well-planned method statements the steel structure was carefully dismantled in the opposite sequence that it would have been erected.All steel was then pressure cleaned to remove Epol’s food dust and transported to its new home in Wisium Brits.

Steelwork Contractor Interview:

This building needed to be modified in just a few places and also extended to accommodate the new feedmill design. Tekla Structures was the perfect tool to be able to do this detailing. Importing the existing building and adding the new extensions enabled minimum modifications to selected items of the building. Ready to receive the newly build steelwork from the factory.

Once the building was completely erected together with the additional extensions the entire building was given a final coat of paint. Giving the client a brand new steel structure.

The building was finally clad with new sheeting and the client boasted a beautiful new state of the art Feed Mill.

A very happy client celebrated this new plant with his industry in a grand opening.

Ferro Eleganza is privileged and proud to have been part of this innovative use of steel!

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork June 2018
Completion date of full project June 2018
Tons of structural steel used Tons
Structural profiles used Hot Rolled Steel / C/R Lipped Channel

 

CLADDING
Completion date of cladding June 2018
Cladding profile/ type used IBR Chromadek®
Coil Manufacturer ArcelorMittal South Africa
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Main Contractor Techmach Technology (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Dram Industrial Painting Contractors

Mafube Colliery Nooitgedacht Mine, Middelburg Relocation of EMV Workshop

The relocation of the EMV Workshop building, a large 280-ton industrial building, is a testament to the sustainability and reusability of structural steel. The structure, which was dismantled, moved over 100km and then reassembled, is made up of heavy hot-rolled sections and large “laced columns” carrying heavy 1.8m high plate girders which house a 200 ton overhead crane. This building is used to service and repair large tipper trucks and other large plant used on the mine. There is no way that the relocation of a building of this size could ever have taken place had it not been for the versatility of steel.

The building was situated in the highest Red Zone Safety area. Therefore, to strip off the roof and side cladding, dismantle a large steel structure, with all the highest of mine safety in place was truly a daunting task. The steelwork contractor put together risk assessments, method statements, fall protection plans, and planned that all safety requirements be met.


On this building, even the cladding had to be re-used, which presented a number of challenges. To replace each sheet in exactly the same position, using the same holes for the screws, otherwise, the roof would be full of holes and leak. Each sheet was marked and numbered in order to re-fit it to the same position.

Because there were no existing drawings for the structure, in order to enable marking up and dismantling the steelwork contractor drew the entire building on Tekla Structures. This enabled a marked up general arrangement which was used to mark every piece of steel with cherry pickers before dismantling the steel structure, reversing the sequence that would have been used to erect the building in the first place. The steel was then cleaned and transported to the new site where the mine wanted the building. The steelwork contractors were very proud of the entire relocation and that it took place 100% accident and incident-free. For this accomplishment, Anglo gave their entire team a bonus as recognition of their accomplishment and safe working practice.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork October 2018
Completion date of full project December 2018
Tons of structural steel used 280 Tons Relocated
Structural profiles used H/R sections / C/R Lipped channel
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding October 2018
Cladding profile/ type used IBR
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage All cladding relocated
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork Contractor Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Ferro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection Galvanising Armco Superlite (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.