Tyris Evergreen Apartments


The Tyris Evergreen apartments comprises two 3-storey apartment blocks, including basements.

This 108-unit complex is situated in the heart of the bustling Fourways area.

By utilizing a light steel frame building approach, the team was able achieve rapid construction, as well as superior thermal and acoustic performance.



Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Nominator

Mitek Industries

Main Contractor

Mitek Industries

Steelwork Contractor

EcoStrut

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

The Precinct Lifestyle Hub

With the housing market in decline Century Property Developments diverted their business model into the rental game. To attract tenants a lifestyle hub was commissioned into construction. The building features a movie theatre, spa, games room, restaurant, and gym. All with the intent to ensure Century Property Developments rental portfolio is the most attractive to clients in the Midrand Area.  


Structural frame and challenges

The structure consists of a portal frame structure fabricated using universal beams with two floor levels which use universal beams to support various types of concrete floors. 

To reduce cost and maintain feasibility of the entire project various slab interactions were utilized. Hollow core technology combined with a composite slab was utilized. The front portal extended down to the lower ground floor; thus, the steel work was required to be constructed in various phases. Allowing for access to pack the hollow core slabs meant structural steel columns had to be erected without the portals, following the packing of the slabs the portals could be completed.  

The bridge connecting Building 2 to Building 3 was design using 3D scan technology from Paramatic South Africa. This was to maintain the natural koppie and ensure the design best aligned with the rock feature available to us. This bridge was constructed from the top down. The walkway propped and installed, the columns installed and then the foundations cast. This was to ensure the bridge aligned perfectly with the footings and touched the earth lightly limiting the environmental impact of the construction. 

Impressive technical aspects

The extensive spans obtained by the hollow core slabs for the Ground floor above the cinema. This was at the edge of Elematics South Africas capabilities.

How this project demonstrates the benefit of steel

Ability to save time with manufacture off-site, the industrial look obtained from exposed portal frames. The exposed steel lends itself to challenging aesthetic decisions. All connections, joints and interactions required careful consideration to ensure the final product was in line with the architectural requirements. The building is honest in its structure and architectural intent.  

How the project team worked together

The original steel contractor went under, and Tass Engineering got involved in the project very late and had to expedite the detailing, supply, manufacture, delivery and erection in order to ensure that a quality product was handed over on time to ensure the success of the housing estate completion. Tass Engineering with the late starting point excelled to achieve tight deadlines. The coordination amongst the slab installers, Tass Engineering and century property development excelled to ensure a successful project.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 

Completion date of steelwork 

1st August 2019 

Completion date of full project 

15th February 2020 

Tonnage and steel profiles used 

82.795 I-Beams, Lipped channel, and Angle

 

CLADDING (If applicable) 

Completion date of cladding 

1st November 2019 

Cladding profile/ type used 

Roof Sheeting  

Cladding area coverage  

 

 

Project Team Role

Company

Nominator

Tass Engineering

Client/ Developer

Century Property Developments

Architect

Century Property Developments

Architect

Century Property Developments

Structural Engineer

ADA Consulting Engineers

Engineer

Century Property Developments

Quantity Surveyor

Century Property Developments

Project Manager

Century Property Developments

Main Contractor

Century Property Construction

Steelwork Contractor

Tass Engineering

Steel Erector

 

Cladding Manufacturer

 

Cladding Supplier

 

Cladding Contractor

NG Roofing

Galvanising

 

Corrosion Protection – Primer

Tass Engineering

Paintwork Contractor – Site / Final coat

Cutting Edge

Photographer, Photo competition

Century Property Developments

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Ngezi Portal 3 – 13000t Stockpile Cover

The structural design of the Ngezi Portal 3 was completed by FL Smidth. Appointed by the Client, Zimbabwe Platinum Mines (Pvt) Ltd. ZIMPLATS is one of the three Platinum mines in Zimbabwe with a total of five mines in production, and the sixth mine in the construction phase. 

The structure consisted of twelve main boxed gantries, 2.5m deep x 2m wide x 54m long. The twelve boxed gantries are welded to base plates on the concrete plinths at the base and bolted to a 7m dia center ring at the top.  This structure covered the Mine’s main ROM stockpile with a capacity of 13 000t. All work was carried out around the already-installed Stockpile Feed Conveyor. The Mine and Stockpile Feed Conveyor continued to operate during night shift operation throughout the installation period. Safety measures were of paramount importance as the Mine enjoys an excellent safety record. 

<a href="https://youtu.be/_jNttI-zubI">https://youtu.be/PT6rUWEa8sc</a>

Shop Detailing 

Shop detailing was completed in Tekla. Detailing and model reviews were done at regular intervals to ensure the design intent was understood and carried into the shop detail drawings. 

Constructability Reviews 

During the shop detailing phase, numerous meetings were held to optimize the constructability of the structure. Safety of the site installation crew was of prime importance, with access walkways being added to ensure their safe transit up and down the structure during installation. 

Trial Assembly 

During the constructability reviews, a few concerns regarding the installation sequence were highlighted by the team. A decision was taken to trial assemble two main gantries with the lattice and infill steelwork between the two. The trial assembly was completed without a single modification having to be made. Trial assembly was assembled and disassembled in two weeks. Once the trial assembly was completed, the green light was given for full production to proceed. 

Manufacture 

Manufacturing was done at Viva Engineering’s workshop in Spartan, Kempton Park.  

The CNC and preparation department cut their teeth on the structure and were excited to make use of the newly acquired FICEP SP16T6 CNC Anglematic which had been commissioned two weeks prior. This machine worked its way through the structure and resulted in the CNC department completing material preparation three weeks ahead of internal planning.  Repetitive gantry sides were assembled in jigs which were inspected and signed off by Viva’s Quality Department before assembly work started.  Welding Process utilized was GMAW and was done with the AMIGG 500PM pulse arch welding machines, resulting in superior weld quality with 90% less spatter and minimal cleaning. 

Cross-Border Exports and Logistics 

The structures were expertly packed by the Viva dispatch and logistics team, ensuring that the structures were safely secured and vehicles across the border were optimized. In total there were 31 vehicles dispatched to site. Vehicles were cleared through Beitbridge Border post and on average were on site within nine days from dispatch.  The center ring, whilst split, fell outside normal transport gauge and needed abnormal transport to site. 

Installation 

Installation on site at Bimha Mine, Ngezi, Zimbabwe, was carried out by Hogarths Engineering; a Bulawayo based Structural/Mechanical Engineering Company. 

Erection Sequence 

Overall, three cranes were used during installation – 250t, 90t and 55t units.  Initially, large base plates were bolted onto the cast-in plates, on top of the concrete plinths. The erected gantries would be welded to these base plates once levels were checked and confirmed. The 12 main gantries were pre-assembled on the ground in positions convenient for lifting. The 90t lattice boom crane was positioned on top of the stockpile, where it lifted in and held the center ring in position ready to receive the main gantries. 

The twelve gantries were lifted into position by the 250t crane and bolted to the center ring being held by the 90t crane. This crane continued to hold the center ring whilst intermediate cross gantries, bracing and purlins were lifted in and fitted. Both the 150t and 55t cranes were in service feeding these members. Overall installation of steelwork took 3.5 months, with completion in early December 2019. No major site alterations or repairs were necessary.  Thankfully there were no safety incidents during the installation period. 

Sheeting 

Roof Sheeting is 0.8 IBR Chromadek, Traffic Green colour. Total is 5500 square meters, with 8000 fixings. Sheeting installation started shortly after the first three bays of steelwork were completed. Completion of the sheeting was a week after completion of the steelwork. 

ISO 9001-2015 (Certification body – TUV) 

Viva Engineering obtained their ISO Certification in August 2019 and Hogarths in February 2020. Certification was at the same time as this work was being completed in our workshop and site, showing that simultaneous production and continuous improvement initiatives are possible. 

Key Points 

Structural mass – 380T 

Radius – 50.2m 

Diameter / Distance between supports – 100.4m 

Coverage – 7 914m2 

Top of structure height – 36.520m 

Comparison 

Northgate Dome – 11 000m2 

Viva Engineering and Hogarths Partnership 

The Viva-Hogarths partnership was formed in 2010. Since then, this partnership has developed into a dynamic and energetic partnership which has successfully completed a number of complex projects in Zimbabwe over the last 10 years. This partnership is of great value to clients looking to execute turnkey supply and installation work in Zimbabwe. 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK

Completion date of steelwork

Last load to site 01/07/2019

Completion date of full project

December 2019

Tonnage and steel profiles used

380t 

 

Project Team Role

Company

Nominator

Viva Steelfab Engineering

Client/ Developer

Zimbabwe Platinum Mines

Architect

 

Structural Engineer

FLSmidth

Engineer

 

Quantity Surveyor

 

Project Manager

 

Main Contractor

Hogarths Engineering

Steelwork Contractor

Viva Steelfab Engineering

Steel Erector

Hogarths Engineering

Cladding Manufacturer

ClassEcon Roofing & Tiles

Cladding Supplier

ClassEcon Roofing & Tiles

Cladding Contractor

PWR Roofing Services

Galvanising

Monoweld Galvanizers

Paintwork Contractor

 

Photographer, Photo competition

 

Photographer, Other submitted images

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Menlyn Main West Atrium Staircase

The 15500m² building is the latest addition to the mixed use precinct of Menlyn Maine. Its primary purpose is for offices, with a small retail space at ground floor level. It is envisioned that the retail space be operated as a restaurant / deli for the office users as well as providing another alternative to the Menlyn Maine Central Square retail development.



The buildings within Menlyn Maine are built onto the boundary line, thereby responding directly to the urban streetscape as well as defining it.  Associated retail space with external spill out balconies activates the streetscape and provide an additional layer of security by means of ‘eyes-on-the-street’.

The Architectural Brief

The brief was to design a unifying element which ties all of the levels together seamlessly, whilst complementing the volume and geometry of the atrium which hosts it. The client wanted the stair to not seem alien in the space, but rather to blend seamlessly with the surrounds. It was envisioned that the staircase would form a talking point to onlookers, and a unifying interior feature to all floors.

At the heart of the building, the multiple-volume atrium functions as a gathering space in the semi-public ground floor. Flanking the northern side of the atrium, the design of the atrium stair is based on the notion of a stair as a social interaction space – an area where people have a chance meeting or interact socially. The stair becomes the platform of showcasing and animating vertical movement in the atrium space, thereby optimistically engendering the use of the stair in lieu of the lifts. The seamless wrapping of the atrium-passage balustrade with the atrium staircase, visually connects the various levels and aids in contextualising human-scale and experience.

Why Steel was used

In conception stage, the materiality came secondary to the design. The staircase was designed to be intricate and organic, with the curves and proportions carefully manipulated to suit the space and adjacent features. Once the team were happy with the design, it became very clear that the only way in which the staircase would be structurally and visually achievable would be if it was constructed from steel. Due to the spans, WSP had recommended that the staircase be built from steel to reduce the self-weight of the structure.  It was integral to the design that the staircase cantilevers from a slab edge with no intermediate supports.  Initially the architect proposed this staircase to be constructed out of concrete however inevitably steel was the only material which made this possible.

Structural Framing

A combination of straight and curved I beam stringers were used on either side of the stair, with large base plates on either end welded to cast-in supports on the slab edges. All slab edges had to be significantly strengthened to host the stringers. Angle irons were welded to the stringers at very specific intervals to host a Vastrap plate, which in turn hosted a solid timber tread. The careful coordination, sizing and positioning of the steel elements ensured that the finishes junction perfectly with one another.

The most impressive technical aspect of this staircase is that the staircase could be 100% manufactured off site, and installed as a retro-fit item. The precision of the staircase, and the complexity of the installation makes this quite an accomplishment.  This is not a traditional half pace stair since one side of the risers are angled away. This created an eccentric support. Additionally the deflection of the structure had to be limited as glass balustrades were to be used. Individual cast in frames had to be placed and cast with great accuracy to ensure accurate post fitment of the face plates onto the protruding bars. The site welding quality and monitoring was of great importance since these large staircases are supported at the stinger ends, welded to the face plates and horizontal anchor plates with 10mm prepared welds. With 21 meters of vertical up, 8 meters of overhead and 10 meters of down hand welds, daily tracking, inspecting and doing non-destructive weld testing was done to ensure each staircase meets with the design requirement before lifting the next staircase into position. With the cast in frame in place and additional re-bar at these positions to strengthen the slab edge, fitting the 120 number of M24 RE 500 chemical anchors into position was always going to be difficult. The rebar and cast in frame positions were scanned and marked out on the slab surface in order to drill and fit these anchors into position.  Once the anchor positions were determined and drilled, the anchor plates were match drilled to suit each anchor position.

Challenges

The biggest challenge was the enormous weight of the staircase in terms of dead and imposed live loads, along with the millimetre precision which was required to make all interfaces perfect. With each stair weighing close to 4 tonnes in steel alone, a maximum of 2 stairs could be placed on the ground floor slab before the slab would collapse. Each staircase had to be split into two pieces at landing level in order to be able to transport the pieces to site and lift them over the building, into the atrium in order to fit the pieces into place with the tower crane. In order to achieve the level of accuracy, each staircase built complete in a jig during fabrication. Welding distortion was of great concern and had to be closely monitored in the workshop to ensure the large pieces remained within tolerance. Once on-site, each piece was lowered into place, supported on scaffolding props, bolted at landing level and welded to the vertical faceplates at the slab edges whilst suspended. Because each staircase had to be constructed in two pieces and welded to faceplates, considerable site welding had to be done.

How this project demonstrates the benefit of steel as a material

This staircase would not have been possible should any other material be used. The cantilever from a concrete slab edge, along with the weight which the stair is able to support (an African elephant on the landing) could not be done with anything other than steel. WSP was able to reduce the self-weight of the structure and adapt the curves required by the architect.

The precision is by far the most special part of this project. Steel sections are notorious for having quite large tolerances in sizes. In this application, there was simply no room for tolerance or errors. Between the Architects’ detailing, the engineer’s sizing, and the supplier’s detail drawings and manufacturing, each element married perfectly.

How the project team worked together

More meetings were had about this staircase than any other element in the building. It was important that each party involved was 100% up to speed with what was required, and how we planned on achieving it. Given the complexity of the curves, fixings and junctions, it was sometimes impossible to communicate on drawings or over emails. For this reason, Boogertman and Partners made use of 3D printing technology, 3D visualizing technology and very strong software to communicate the intent to all consultants. Once on-site, the main contractor made use of all of these tools to clarify the intricacies with all installers involved.  WSP was in constant communication with the site team, especially with respect to the level of accuracy required to ensure that the connection points lined out. 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project  
Street Address  
Town  
Province 
197 Amarand Ave 
Menlyn Maine 
Pretoria   
Google Maps link  https://www.google.co.za/maps/dir//-25.7862173,28.2821603/@-25.7865583,28.2822444,18z   

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  04 February 2020 
Completion date of full project  Approx. 20 March’20  
Tonnage and steel profiles used  29ton UB457*191*67 – VT4.5 landings & treads  

Project Team Role

Company

Nominator

Tass Engineering

Client/ Developer

Barrow Properties (Pty) Ltd

 

Menlyn Maine Investment Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Architect

Boogertman Partners

Structural Engineer

WSP, Structures, Africa

Quantity Surveyor

RLB Pentad Quantity Surveyors

Main Contractor

Barrow Construction (PTY) Ltd

Steelwork Contractor

Tass Engineering

Steel Erector

Tass Engineering

Photographer, Photo competition

Tass Engineering

Photographer, Other submitted images

Tass Engineering

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Tshwane Regional Mall

Tshwane Reginal Mall is a new mall in Mamelodi Pretoria. Steel was integral to architectural look and design of the mall, especially with the bold steel entrances and pop out roof along the mall.

 

 

Structural framing

The main mall roof structure mainly consisted of I-beam rafters with Metsec purlins, allowing for long spans and a reduced overall tonnage to the structure.

The Large entrances were constructed of large curved box sections. Fabricated out of plate. Top and bottom flanges laser cut to shape, and side web plates rolled to suit.

Split tee sections with rolled CHS sections creating the fanning sun screens along the outside.

Inside the mall supporting these entrance roofs are huge CHS struts impressively supporting the roofs.

This theme is continues throughout the mall with large concrete columns and CHS “tree structures” supporting pop out roofs along the main mall areas.

The food court have stainless steel pipes like “sticks” decorating the area.

Outside all along the front of the mall, there are heavy I beam canopy structures adding to the bold look of steel as you approach the entrances.

The entire parking lot roof was erected on top of the fourth floor slab. So this required spider cranes to be able to work on top of these slabs.

Then on the other hand the heavy entrance box sections required large 50ton cranes to be able to lift the large sections into place.

The benefits of using steel

In a mall like this most of the structure is build out of concrete and bricks. But the appeal to the mall is the Bold steel sections used in the entrance, External walkways, and large steel pipes supporting the roofs inside the mall walkway areas. This can only be achieved by the architectural use of steel.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Physical address of the project  

 

 

 

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsamaya Avenue 

Mamelodi 

Gauteng 

Google Maps link  https://goo.gl/maps/dsdMcjCMxm6m5dENA  

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  June 2020 
Completion date of full project  2021 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  500t – Hot Rolled, Tubular and Metsec Profiles 
Project Team RoleCompany
NominatorFerro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Client/ DeveloperIsibonelo Property Services (Pty) Ltd
ArchitectSVA International (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Pure Consulting (Pty) Ltd
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor (PQS)Nonku Ntshona & Associates
Project ManagerLMKV Management Consultants
Main ContractorGD Irons Construction (Pty) Ltd
Steelwork ContractorFerro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Steel ErectorFerro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer 
Cladding Supplier 
Cladding ContractorChartwell Roofing (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection 
GalvanisingArmco Superlite (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection 
Paintwork ContractorJokes Building Construction CC
Photographer, Photo competitionFerro Eleganza (Pty) Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

 

Nike Store Spiral Staircase, Rosebank

 

 

With Nike Rosebank we had to overcome some interesting challenges to connect the two store levels, which sit almost perpendicular to each other, with a single vertical integration system. Due to the positioning of the two levels, this meant that the staircase would be at the forefront of our trading space on the ground floor and a conventional staircase design would consume a very large portion of our trading floor area, these are both limiting factors when you consider that retail rental space in Rosebank comes at a high cost and every effort is made to maximize ROI.


Finding the right solution for this store put us on a very lengthy design process (almost 4 months), where we tested multiple staircase designs and configurations between the Nike Designers in Europe, our local Architectural Partners (TCRPv) and CADCON in South Africa.


The Nike Designers drew inspiration from European multi-level residential structures that have limited floor area to accommodate conventional staircase designs and as such make use of spiral staircases to connect the levels. These staircases are often quite minimalistic in design and don’t have to carry multiple occupants simultaneously unlike retail environments, so in order to beef up our design to carry the weight of simultaneous users, we had to develop a unit that was structurally sound without becoming overly weighted (from a visual sense) with heavy and multiple support posts, we wanted the consumer to be able to experience both levels of the store as they used the staircase and not feel as if they are navigating through a silo. We transitioned the timber floor finishes from the First Floor environment onto the staircase treads to give the unit a softness and to help us link the two gender split retail spaces.


These factors brought us to the design that you get to experience in the store, a structure that consists of mild steel plates running on two separate stringers, with its full weight (about 4 tons) being carried on only two foot plates. Over and above the staircase design, there was also major structural work done to the existing Basement and First Floor level slabs to give us the opening to see the ground floor as you descended the staircase and to give us the support to carry this staircase mass.
This spiral staircase is certainly a first for Nike across our global footprint of retail stores and I think can safely say that there is no other retail space in South Africa that uses this unconventional vertical integration method.
It was both challenging and eye-opening to see this structure being designed, manufactured, delivered and installed, while still constructing a retail space around it, definitely something I will always remember. – Europe


What is the purpose of the structure/ project?


The staircase was a critical architectural element in the Nike Store as this needed to be an element which would both physically and visually connect the two floors and in order for the store to maintain a sense of “connection” and “cohesiveness” despite the store being split over 2 levels. In terms of the stores overall design, the staircase had to make a statement; one which would create a sense of interest (spatially) but also be inviting to shoppers to explore whilst also strengthened the flow and movement through the store and irrespective of the change in floors. Careful thought and consideration was given to the ergonomics of the staircase to ensure that more than one person could travel between the levels simultaneously.


• What was the brief to the architect?

One of the biggest challenges with the Nike Rosebank store was to successfully connect the two store levels as there was limited opportunity, and area, where the floors could overlap. The existing slab construction and extent of existing services further limited the staircases positioning. Ultimately through careful co-ordination and team work, a possible position was identified at the front of the store, ideal for maximum visibility to shoppers, but now further restricted by the glazing line of the actual store, but which was ultimately overcome by the compact stair design which you see today.

• Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes, steel was always envisaged as the preferred material for the stairs.
We believe that the flexibility and durability of steel adds a dynamic element to a building project, allowing designers to think outside the box.

• Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used and why?

It was important to Nike that the structural design of the stair would not detract from the greater “sculptural element” that we needed to achieve. To achieve this, the following needed to happen;
• The balustrade and stringers needed to be made seamless.
• Due to the distance in height between the two floors, a landing was required to ensure a comfortable journey between floors. This concept although simple, complicated the structural design of the staircase.
• The risers needed to be designed as open to keep the structure visually as “light” as possible.
• Each tread needed to be bent from a single metal sheet so as to avoid unnecessary joints and junctions.
• The treads needed to be filled with concrete to stabilize and mitigate the vibrations whilst walking between floors walking. It is noticeable how solid the staircase feels when a person is walking on it.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project   

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

  

 

Oxford Street

The Zone

Rosebank 

GPS Co-ordinates    

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  20/11/2019 
 Completion date of full project  30/11/2019 
Tons of structural steel used  3 Tons 
Structural profiles used  Combination of Platework and Tubular 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Refinery Business Park

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project    

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

   

 

48 North Reef Rd,  

Wilbart,  

Germiston  

Google Maps link  
Project Team RoleCompany
Nominator 
Client/ Developer 
ArchitectCimato Moroldo Architects
Structural Engineer  
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor 
Project Manager 
Main Contractor 
Steelwork Contractor 
Steel Erector 
Cladding Manufacturer 
Cladding SupplierSAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding ContractorA&I Sheeters
CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding 31/09/2019 
Cladding profile/ type used Widedek – Thunderstorm and Saflok – Zincal  
Cladding area coverage  2000M² 
Cladding tonnage 50 tons   

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Mabopane Square

 

Mabopane square is a commercial development in Pretoria. Safintra South Africa provided 57.2 tonnes of Saflok covering 10 400 square meters, and 18.8 tonnes of Newlok, covering 3300 square meters for this project.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 

Physical address of the project

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Mabopane

Pretoria 

Google Maps link   

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  November 2019 
Cladding profile/ type used  Safintra Saflok 700 ZincAl | Safintra Newlok ColorPlus 
Cladding area coverage   Saflok – 10 400m² | Newlok – 3 300m² 
Cladding tonnage  57.2 tons | 18.8 tons 
Project Team Role Company
Nominator  
Client/ Developer McCormick Property
Architect MDS Architecture
Structural Engineer Hannes Hattingh Consulting
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor  
Project Manager  
Main Contractor Mike Buyskes Construction
Steelwork Contractor  
Steel Detailer KRU Detailing
Cladding Manufacturer  
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Steel Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Ascendis Medical

 

Text by AOJ and Gregg Cocking / PRchitecture

This landmark project is located on a prime corner of the Boundary Park Industrial Park development currently underway in Northriding, Johannesburg. The site location and tenant’s large office staff complement led to a less conventional office and warehouse ratio of 60:40. “This model is seemingly becoming more common nowadays with a shrinking global economy and the improvements in technology. Many large companies with distribution facilities are downsizing and consolidating their operations,” says Alessio Lacovig of Architects Of Justice (AOJ).

The tenant, Ascendis Medical, is one such company. With a progressive directorship at its helm, it needed to consolidate three facilities into one to optimise operations and improve business efficiencies. This large and rather complex program was cleverly distributed by AOJ over three floors of P-Grade equivalent offices totalling 6 500 m². Apart from a strong focus around sustainability, the office was designed around two key principals from the onset, one being user experience and the other the creation of a statement building.



In the design, the office footprint was shaped around an irregular open courtyard to increase the perimeter façade. This maximises the building’s presence from the adjacent street intersection, increases the amount of natural daylight entering the building and enhances the external views from within the building. Both the shape of the courtyard and the longer perimeter façade result in a building that appears even larger from the major intersection on which the building is located, emphasising it’s importance as Ascendis’ new head office. The highly intricate and impressive glass corner entrance is the most striking architectural element of the building; shaped to improve passive solar control of the triple volume entrance foyer.

AOJ’s directive to make the building as prominent as possible, and the site conditions, whereby the building sits elevated from the road intersection, made it possible to include a 2 000 m² basement parking level, which at the same time improved earthwork cut-to-fill ratios and stormwater management. This elevation of the building also gives the main foyer and its linked walkways on all floors fantastic views as the surrounding contours fall to the north. “Maybe this was lucky in a way, but it ultimately came about from considering the design early on in the process and thinking of how we could make the most out of the communal spaces,” says Lacovig.


The Ascendis building was the first of four to be designed by AOJ at the Boundary Park precinct. “In order to secure Ascendis as a tenant, Orpen Group, the developer, first needed to illustrate the potential of the development and the site to them, which lead to an initial design pitch, by AOJ, to Ascendis for the building. “This pitch clearly went really well,” notes Lacovig. “With the site being at a major intersection on Malibongwe Drive, a very busy thoroughfare, the opportunity was there to make the landmark building.” The initial mindset focussed on creating a shimmering glass building to relate to Ascendis as a company which competes globally.  

Façade

“Our design was a response to the client’s desire for a fully glazed façade that would suit an international style of architecture, to fit with what is more commonly seen in areas like Sandton but that would costs less to build,” explains Lacovig. “The conventional way to achieve this is to use curtain walling because you’re trying to get glass to span floor-to-ceiling over several floors, and you subsequently need double or triple performance glazing, which further pushes the price up.”
AOJ’s approach was different; they identified the two aspects of most value when making a ‘glass building’, being the user experience from the inside and what the building looks like from the outside. By running the glazing continuously across the length of the office, and from the ceiling height down to 800mm above the floor (effective desk height) and not from slab to slab in a relatively dense office space, you can achieve the desired perception of transparency from the inside. “For a building of this scale, it also reduces the construction cost because there is less glass and it also increases the speed at which the contractor can build on site, because they are now applying a more conventional building method of brick work and openings for windows, rather than having a concrete structure and relying on a single supplier to finish off the façade,” explains Lacovig.
“From the exterior, what this does is reduce the amount of glass on the façade which is exposed to the sun, which automatically reduces unwanted solar heat gain.” A second full glazing element was introduced as an additional skin to the façade. “This second skin is not only the major aesthetic element of the building, but it is also a noise buffer (as it deflects road noise from Malibongwe Road). In addition, a fixed solar control element was added; this also serves as an access walkway for easy cleaning of the windows from the outside,” he says.

Ultimately, it was about creating a façade which was functional, and not just an aesthetic showpiece. “Good design is multifunctional. We needed the large glass façade, and the economic constraints very quickly pushed our creativity to make this element more valuable,” says Lacovig. The coloured blue glass came into play as an idea to tie the building back to the Ascendis brand, and it was designed in such a way that the client can cover it with vinyl in the future if they want. The only break to the glass façade comes in the form of a solid box, in which the building auditorium is housed. This also serves as a signage wall for Ascendis branding.

“The predominant material on the façades of the building is facebrick,” says Mike Rassmann from AOJ. “This choice was largely to reduce maintenance on the building and one cannot get away from the fact that cementitious products are a big polluter of the environment, and if you have to plaster a façade of this size you will be using a large amount of cement, not to mention paint. Using a facebrick façade is in many ways a responsible thing to do, although it does require more attention during construction to get the bricks laid properly.”
Part of the challenge AOJ had was trying to find the right colour brick; “We wanted a modern looking building, and for the brick not to show behind the blue glass. This is quite difficult to do it with facebrick’s earthy, natural tones, so we picked the most muted dark brick available which has the added benefit of not showing dirt as much as a lighter brick would,” explains Lacovig. The brick used in the courtyard, on the other hand, was a lighter colour brick which was specified for improved reflection of daylight within this space.

Courtyard

The courtyard was an integral part of the architect’s design from the outset. “A courtyard in an office building gives you the ability to have a wider office floorplate, because you can have natural light entering the workspace from two sides,” Lacovig points out. “We ended up having a 17-metre-deep floorplate, which, if you illuminate from only one side of the façade, becomes very dark.” This 17m depth is also the consequence of the basement parking grid layout and is well suited for the buildings structural design.
“While the courtyard does create a social space, it was more about making the building energy efficient and more comfortable for users. It enables more natural ventilation and more natural lighting, thus reducing energy consumption as you don’t have to have lights on throughout the day nor do you have to fully rely on mechanical ventilation to moderate the internal temperature, which, in a building of this size can add up quite quickly to hundreds of thousands of rands,” he says.
The courtyard is directly linked with the main foyer reception of the building on one side and the staff canteen on the other. This proximity allows this social space to be used for informal meetings between staff and visitors alike. A covered glass structure creates a walkway that ensures moving to the canteen from the reception is comfortable even in bad weather and also provides sheltered seating space. Large north facing stacking doors can be used to open the canteen space onto the courtyard on more temperate days, and makes this space appropriate for larger gatherings

The building, with a 60:40 split between office block and warehouse is seen more as a head office with a distribution facility attached, rather than a warehouse with an office facility attached. “During the design, there was a toss-up between Orpen building exactly what Ascendis needed at that point, and being mindful of Ascendis’ imminent growth by adding a third floor. This made things a little more complicated for AOJ,” says Lacovig, “but that is part of the process, and despite the back and forward, much of the original design intention remained in the completed building.”


The third floor consists of additional office space for growth and a 100-seater auditorium with meeting rooms as part of a training centre, allowing the company to expand without relocating in the future. On the west corner of the same floor, a bar and outdoor terrace offers a place for staff and visitors to socialise while taking in the surrounding views and setting sun. The warehouse component incorporates a double storey pilot office at the centre of the interface between the warehouse and the yard, giving the operational staff full control over the dispatch and receiving processes. A two-storey staff block with change rooms and worker’s canteen space is linked to the yard of the office, keeping the utility aspects of the building on the same side. A backup water supply is housed on the internal portion of the pilot office roof to keep the facility operational for up to seven days should municipal supply be interrupted, while the warehouse roof was designed to accommodate solar PV panels in the future, which, given the current challenges South Africa is facing, would completely address the need for the building’s water and power security. A higher floor specification was used in a dedicated section of the warehouse, so VNA (Very Narrow Aisle) racking could be used to take advantage of the 14m warehouse height and improve use of the floor area.


“Additional foundation footings were also incorporated into the warehouse floor, adjacent to the courtyard wall to allow for even further growth of the office space by 10m into the warehouse. This would effectively complete the fourth side of the courtyard space. That has not happened – and it might never happen – but it is another way that our design futureproofs the building for Ascendis and Orpen,” notes Lacovig. 

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project 

 

Street Address  

Town

Province

  

 

460 Malibongwe Rd

Kya Sands,

Randburg

GPS Co-ordinates 27956 78, -26.044 789
CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding  
Cladding profile/ type used Safintra Saflock 700/WideSpan
Cladding area coverage 9000m²  + 2300m² 
Cladding tonnage 45 tonnes + 11.5 ton

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Safintra South Africa
Client/ Developer Orpen Group
Architect Architects of Justice
Structural Engineer  
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor Ferrer Hagim QS
Project Manager  
Main Contractor  
Steelwork Contractor  
Steel Erector  
Cladding Manufacturer  
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Hollyberry Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Menlyn Maine West Atrium Skylight

 

Park Lane West is a new premium grade commercial development in Menlyn. At the center of the 7 storey building there is 26m long by 17m wide atrium skylight which brings natural light into the building

Architectural Brief

The architectural brief was to create a modern skylight, with lightweight steel members and a very clean geometry, that would bring the right balance of heat and light into the atrium below. Due to the need for a lightweight structure which could support large glass lites, steel was the obviously material of choice. 


Structural Framing

Rectangular hollow sections were selected for the main beam so concealed connections. In addition, since the structure was designed as a braced three-pin pitched roof, the hollow sections efficiently carried the bending and compression forces. Small diameter round tubes were used for longitudinal apex bracing.

Due to the accuracy of the steelwork and efficiency of the glazing installation team, up to 16 glass panels could be installed in one day. Ie, this equates to the weight of the full steel structure in glass panels per day.

The low pitch ridged roof consisting of neatly fabricated hollow steel sections and large glass panels created a simple but bespoke looking skylight.

Cladding

To reduce the number of steel beams, large point supported glass panels were used. Each panel was 2.2m wide x 3.3m long and weighed approximately 350kg.

Challenges

Since all the glass lites were fully tempered and prefabricated the steelwork needed to be installed to a very high degree of tolerance to ensure each glass lite would fit. Extensive QAQC checks were carried out both in Tass’s factory and onsite before the cladding was installed. 

How does this project demonstrate the benefits of steel as a material?

High yield strength of the S355 tubes enabled small beams to be used while the hollow sections enabled neat hidden connection details. In addition, due to the stringent deflection requirements of the glass, both during installation and long term, the high stiffness of structure enable the joints between each glass panel to be sealed with a neat strip of silicone only. No mullions were required.

How did the project team work together?

LEAF Structures worked very closely with the professional team, as well as the general contractor, to come up with a solution that met the architectural intent, budget, and site constraints. During the design phase, several structural and cladding solutions were developed and priced so the client could pick their preferred option.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
Physical address of the project 

 

Street Address

Town

Province

  

 

97 Amarand Ave,

Waterkloof Glen,

Pretoria, 0010

Google Maps link  
STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork October 2019
Completion date of full project March 2020
Tonnage and steel profiles used 5.2 tons. CHS 200x100mm

CLADDING (If applicable)
Completion date of cladding December 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Point support fully tempered laminated glass
Cladding area coverage 460sqm
Cladding tonnage 24 tonnes
Project Team Role Company
Nominator LEAF Structures
Client/ Developer Menlyn Main
Architect Boogertman and Partners
Structural Engineer LEAF Structures
Engineer  
Quantity Surveyor  
Project Manager  
Main Contractor Barrow Construction
Steelwork Contractor Tass Engineering (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector  
Cladding Manufacturer LEAF Structures
Cladding Supplier LEAF Structures
Cladding Contractor LEAF Structures

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.