Tyris Evergreen Apartments


The Tyris Evergreen apartments comprises two 3-storey apartment blocks, including basements.

This 108-unit complex is situated in the heart of the bustling Fourways area.

By utilizing a light steel frame building approach, the team was able achieve rapid construction, as well as superior thermal and acoustic performance.



Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Nominator

Mitek Industries

Main Contractor

Mitek Industries

Steelwork Contractor

EcoStrut

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

The Precinct Lifestyle Hub

With the housing market in decline Century Property Developments diverted their business model into the rental game. To attract tenants a lifestyle hub was commissioned into construction. The building features a movie theatre, spa, games room, restaurant, and gym. All with the intent to ensure Century Property Developments rental portfolio is the most attractive to clients in the Midrand Area.  


Structural frame and challenges

The structure consists of a portal frame structure fabricated using universal beams with two floor levels which use universal beams to support various types of concrete floors. 

To reduce cost and maintain feasibility of the entire project various slab interactions were utilized. Hollow core technology combined with a composite slab was utilized. The front portal extended down to the lower ground floor; thus, the steel work was required to be constructed in various phases. Allowing for access to pack the hollow core slabs meant structural steel columns had to be erected without the portals, following the packing of the slabs the portals could be completed.  

The bridge connecting Building 2 to Building 3 was design using 3D scan technology from Paramatic South Africa. This was to maintain the natural koppie and ensure the design best aligned with the rock feature available to us. This bridge was constructed from the top down. The walkway propped and installed, the columns installed and then the foundations cast. This was to ensure the bridge aligned perfectly with the footings and touched the earth lightly limiting the environmental impact of the construction. 

Impressive technical aspects

The extensive spans obtained by the hollow core slabs for the Ground floor above the cinema. This was at the edge of Elematics South Africas capabilities.

How this project demonstrates the benefit of steel

Ability to save time with manufacture off-site, the industrial look obtained from exposed portal frames. The exposed steel lends itself to challenging aesthetic decisions. All connections, joints and interactions required careful consideration to ensure the final product was in line with the architectural requirements. The building is honest in its structure and architectural intent.  

How the project team worked together

The original steel contractor went under, and Tass Engineering got involved in the project very late and had to expedite the detailing, supply, manufacture, delivery and erection in order to ensure that a quality product was handed over on time to ensure the success of the housing estate completion. Tass Engineering with the late starting point excelled to achieve tight deadlines. The coordination amongst the slab installers, Tass Engineering and century property development excelled to ensure a successful project.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 

Completion date of steelwork 

1st August 2019 

Completion date of full project 

15th February 2020 

Tonnage and steel profiles used 

82.795 I-Beams, Lipped channel, and Angle

 

CLADDING (If applicable) 

Completion date of cladding 

1st November 2019 

Cladding profile/ type used 

Roof Sheeting  

Cladding area coverage  

 

 

Project Team Role

Company

Nominator

Tass Engineering

Client/ Developer

Century Property Developments

Architect

Century Property Developments

Architect

Century Property Developments

Structural Engineer

ADA Consulting Engineers

Engineer

Century Property Developments

Quantity Surveyor

Century Property Developments

Project Manager

Century Property Developments

Main Contractor

Century Property Construction

Steelwork Contractor

Tass Engineering

Steel Erector

 

Cladding Manufacturer

 

Cladding Supplier

 

Cladding Contractor

NG Roofing

Galvanising

 

Corrosion Protection – Primer

Tass Engineering

Paintwork Contractor – Site / Final coat

Cutting Edge

Photographer, Photo competition

Century Property Developments

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Ngezi Portal 3 – 13000t Stockpile Cover

The structural design of the Ngezi Portal 3 was completed by FL Smidth. Appointed by the Client, Zimbabwe Platinum Mines (Pvt) Ltd. ZIMPLATS is one of the three Platinum mines in Zimbabwe with a total of five mines in production, and the sixth mine in the construction phase. 

The structure consisted of twelve main boxed gantries, 2.5m deep x 2m wide x 54m long. The twelve boxed gantries are welded to base plates on the concrete plinths at the base and bolted to a 7m dia center ring at the top.  This structure covered the Mine’s main ROM stockpile with a capacity of 13 000t. All work was carried out around the already-installed Stockpile Feed Conveyor. The Mine and Stockpile Feed Conveyor continued to operate during night shift operation throughout the installation period. Safety measures were of paramount importance as the Mine enjoys an excellent safety record. 

<a href="https://youtu.be/_jNttI-zubI">https://youtu.be/PT6rUWEa8sc</a>

Shop Detailing 

Shop detailing was completed in Tekla. Detailing and model reviews were done at regular intervals to ensure the design intent was understood and carried into the shop detail drawings. 

Constructability Reviews 

During the shop detailing phase, numerous meetings were held to optimize the constructability of the structure. Safety of the site installation crew was of prime importance, with access walkways being added to ensure their safe transit up and down the structure during installation. 

Trial Assembly 

During the constructability reviews, a few concerns regarding the installation sequence were highlighted by the team. A decision was taken to trial assemble two main gantries with the lattice and infill steelwork between the two. The trial assembly was completed without a single modification having to be made. Trial assembly was assembled and disassembled in two weeks. Once the trial assembly was completed, the green light was given for full production to proceed. 

Manufacture 

Manufacturing was done at Viva Engineering’s workshop in Spartan, Kempton Park.  

The CNC and preparation department cut their teeth on the structure and were excited to make use of the newly acquired FICEP SP16T6 CNC Anglematic which had been commissioned two weeks prior. This machine worked its way through the structure and resulted in the CNC department completing material preparation three weeks ahead of internal planning.  Repetitive gantry sides were assembled in jigs which were inspected and signed off by Viva’s Quality Department before assembly work started.  Welding Process utilized was GMAW and was done with the AMIGG 500PM pulse arch welding machines, resulting in superior weld quality with 90% less spatter and minimal cleaning. 

Cross-Border Exports and Logistics 

The structures were expertly packed by the Viva dispatch and logistics team, ensuring that the structures were safely secured and vehicles across the border were optimized. In total there were 31 vehicles dispatched to site. Vehicles were cleared through Beitbridge Border post and on average were on site within nine days from dispatch.  The center ring, whilst split, fell outside normal transport gauge and needed abnormal transport to site. 

Installation 

Installation on site at Bimha Mine, Ngezi, Zimbabwe, was carried out by Hogarths Engineering; a Bulawayo based Structural/Mechanical Engineering Company. 

Erection Sequence 

Overall, three cranes were used during installation – 250t, 90t and 55t units.  Initially, large base plates were bolted onto the cast-in plates, on top of the concrete plinths. The erected gantries would be welded to these base plates once levels were checked and confirmed. The 12 main gantries were pre-assembled on the ground in positions convenient for lifting. The 90t lattice boom crane was positioned on top of the stockpile, where it lifted in and held the center ring in position ready to receive the main gantries. 

The twelve gantries were lifted into position by the 250t crane and bolted to the center ring being held by the 90t crane. This crane continued to hold the center ring whilst intermediate cross gantries, bracing and purlins were lifted in and fitted. Both the 150t and 55t cranes were in service feeding these members. Overall installation of steelwork took 3.5 months, with completion in early December 2019. No major site alterations or repairs were necessary.  Thankfully there were no safety incidents during the installation period. 

Sheeting 

Roof Sheeting is 0.8 IBR Chromadek, Traffic Green colour. Total is 5500 square meters, with 8000 fixings. Sheeting installation started shortly after the first three bays of steelwork were completed. Completion of the sheeting was a week after completion of the steelwork. 

ISO 9001-2015 (Certification body – TUV) 

Viva Engineering obtained their ISO Certification in August 2019 and Hogarths in February 2020. Certification was at the same time as this work was being completed in our workshop and site, showing that simultaneous production and continuous improvement initiatives are possible. 

Key Points 

Structural mass – 380T 

Radius – 50.2m 

Diameter / Distance between supports – 100.4m 

Coverage – 7 914m2 

Top of structure height – 36.520m 

Comparison 

Northgate Dome – 11 000m2 

Viva Engineering and Hogarths Partnership 

The Viva-Hogarths partnership was formed in 2010. Since then, this partnership has developed into a dynamic and energetic partnership which has successfully completed a number of complex projects in Zimbabwe over the last 10 years. This partnership is of great value to clients looking to execute turnkey supply and installation work in Zimbabwe. 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK

Completion date of steelwork

Last load to site 01/07/2019

Completion date of full project

December 2019

Tonnage and steel profiles used

380t 

 

Project Team Role

Company

Nominator

Viva Steelfab Engineering

Client/ Developer

Zimbabwe Platinum Mines

Architect

 

Structural Engineer

FLSmidth

Engineer

 

Quantity Surveyor

 

Project Manager

 

Main Contractor

Hogarths Engineering

Steelwork Contractor

Viva Steelfab Engineering

Steel Erector

Hogarths Engineering

Cladding Manufacturer

ClassEcon Roofing & Tiles

Cladding Supplier

ClassEcon Roofing & Tiles

Cladding Contractor

PWR Roofing Services

Galvanising

Monoweld Galvanizers

Paintwork Contractor

 

Photographer, Photo competition

 

Photographer, Other submitted images

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

SKF

 


The new SKF warehouse is a steel structure composed of girder, truss and tubular bracing systems. Metsec sections were used for the side cladding rails. The warehouse structure contains a 35 tonne overhead crane as well as a 10 tonne gable gantry crane.⁠ ⁠ A key feature of the project is the tubular posts supporting the office slab, as well as the tubular louvre support system which wraps around the building.⁠

 

 

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project   

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Erf 487  

 

6 Marlin Road, 

Jet Park, 

Boksburg,  

Gauteng 

Google Maps link  https://goo.gl/maps/YRL9FLd8j5xzfKY28 

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  December 2019 
Completion date of full project  March 2020 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  240 tons  

 

 

UB and UC columns, 

UB and angle lattice girders, 

Angle lattice trusses, 

SHS eave beams, 

Metsec purlins and girts, 

Angle and CHS bracing, 

Bent plate box gutters, 

IPE and UB gable rafters, 

UB and angle lattice crane beam columns, 

UB and PFC compound crane beams, 

CHS slab support columns, 

Tubular louvre supports. 

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Hella’s Automotive South Africa

 

The new warehouse and offices for Hella Automotive serve as the gateway to Africa and helps to strengthen HELLA’s administration and logistics operations.

The Architectural Brief

The curved design of the building and roof structure was derived and influenced by the Hella Automotive logo which consists of an oval shape and the word Hella written in the centre. The design, therefore, captures the shape through a seamless oval extrusion through the entire length of the building and the glass façade reveals centrally the activities within the building.

The curved design of the building and roof structure required steel girder trusses that give the building its unique shape.

The unconventional curved design proved to be both economical and supports Hella’s ethos of transcending the conventional. Because of the building’s location adjacent to the freeway and it being experienced by motorists at high speeds, it was an important design consideration to come up with a design that will be both eye-catching to the passer-by and simultaneously provide a pleasant working environment for the employees and promote the Hella Brand.

Architecturally the building moves away from the post and lintel construction where the elements have connection points into a free-flowing structure that blurs the lines between wall and roof.

Cladding

Global Roofing Solutions rolled and cranking sheeting on site. Handling the entire length curved sheeting was challenging to hoist the curved full-length sheets onto the roof. The pictures truly emphasise the complexity which was successfully achieved. 

Global Roofing Solutions rolled and cranked the Klip-Lok 406 sheeting on site. Scaffolding had to be built approx. 6-meters into the air to accommodate the sheet length and curve herewith to roof and clad the building. Having GRS’s quality and technical teams on site to support the accuracy for this detail made it a success. Sheeting was hoisted up using cables and straps onto the roof for installation.

Challenges

Curved, steel girder trusses that give the building its unique shape, but also carries all the load, demanded of the structural engineers to think out of the box. They produced a design and drawings for the manufacturing of these members – without which the building would not have been a success. These trusses were manufactured in a local factory in Uitenhage.

How this project demonstrates the benefits of steel as a material

The GRS Klip-Lok 406 concealed fix steel roof sheeting was rolled out in one length on site to accommodate the design of the building. Special care had to be taken from a Health and Safety point of view since both the plant and the handling of these great lengths can present challenges – especially during periods of high winds.

How the project team worked together

BNM has been involved with a number of industrial projects for the Coega Development Corporation before but this was BNM Architects – Andrew’s first building of this nature. The team consisted of BVI consulting engineers (for structural, civil, mechanical and electrical) and FWJK Quantity Surveyors. The success of the project can only be attributed to a closed working relationship amongst all the members of the team. Jacques van Zyl (BVI) was the Principal Agent. The design was well executed by a very capable contractor – WBHO

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project  

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

  

 

81 Nürburgring Street, 

SEZ, Port Elizabeth,  

6100 

 

Google Maps link  https://goo.gl/maps/e5tUy6QdhwMmXhez5  

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer CDC
Architect BNM
Structural Engineer Bvi
Engineer Bvi
Quantity Surveyor FWJK
Project Manager Bvi
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor  
Steel Erector  
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Supplier Global Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Scheltema & co
Corrosion Protection Bluescope Steel

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  04/25/2019 
Cladding profile/ type used  Klip-Lok 406 with Curving 
Cladding area coverage   5000m2 (4000m2 roof + 1000m2 cladding) 
Cladding tonnage  31 tons 

EMS Head Quarters – Dora Nginza

This building, commissioned for use by the National Department of Health as their Emergency Medical Services Headquarters, houses a call centre and manages the dispatch of emergency paramedic response units within the Port Elizabeth area.

The architect’s brief was to design a building that would aid in consolidating the EMS Headquarters into one centralised location and distribution point, as well as to bring an identity and civic presence to the EMS, reflecting the role that they play in society.

The design, both structurally and aesthetically, makes use of a selected pallet of materials which contribute towards a clean, yet interesting architectural experience. In addition to the main building, the site incorporates covered parking areas for ambulances, parking for staff, a carwash, a helipad, and a helicopter hangar – constructed almost entirely out of steel.

The main building is predominantly a concrete frame structure which makes use of some steel elements, bringing a lightness to the interior spaces. The main structural steel element is the roof structure, constructed from circular hollow steel sections and on display in the main entrance foyer, while steel columns are used to support the peripheral internal walkways. These are complemented internally by steel finishes, such as balustrading and cladding to the reception area.

The structural framing

Steel elements were used extensively for the façade features such as the shading louvre elements, decorative pergola elements, balustrades, and walkways – which are used both for maintenance and shading to floors below. In strategic places the roof eave rafters were also detailed as steel elements which are left exposed to tie in with the external aesthetic of the building, creating large, thin floating planes.

The carport structures and helicopter hangar are constructed almost entirely of steel and clad to match the roofing of the main building. The hangar is a standard steel portal frame structure with purlins and cladding rails.

Cladding

The sheeting selected for the project was the Zip-Tek 420 profile. This was not the original selection as it was initially intended to be a conventional Klip-Lok concealed fix system. This, however, would have resulted in jagged edges and valleys which would likely have caused problems in the future with water ingress and would have detracted from the elegant appeal of the curved building.

The Zip-Tek 420 sheet can be tapered, which allowed for a seamless, elegant roof over the curved building, eliminating the risk of water leaks. With this specific profile being very wide and deep, with excellent water carrying capacity, the decision was made to use it for the entire project.

The tapering of the roof sheeting is a detailed process, which consists of each sheet being drawn and cut individually. Each side of the sheet – both male and female ribs – had to also be rolled individually and not in one single process, as would have been the case with conventional sheeting. In order to make sure that this was a success, and to avoid complications on site, a point cloud survey was done after the roof trusses were installed, providing the sheeting supplier with the exact site geometry to work off. This aided in minimizing risk typically associated with both the manufacturing process of the purpose made sheets, and with the on-site installation.

The tapering of the roof sheeting is a detailed process, which consists of each sheet being drawn and cut individually. Each side of the sheet – both male and female ribs – had to also be rolled individually and not in one single process, as would have been the case with conventional sheeting. In order to make sure that this was a success, and to avoid complications on site, a point cloud survey was done after the roof trusses were installed, providing the sheeting supplier with the exact site geometry to work off. This aided in minimizing risk typically associated with both the manufacturing process of the purpose made sheets, and with the on-site installation.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative about the steelwork in this project?

Curved roof – This unconventional design adds a monumentality to the building and without the innovative use of steel would not have been successfully achieved. Constant co-ordination within the project team and a forthcoming attitude from the contractor certainly aided in the successful implementation of this design element.

How does this project demonstrate the benefit of steel as a material

Decorative steel – Steel is conventionally thought of as a structural material. In this case, its structural benefits were taken advantage of in order to design lightweight walkways and shading devices that added value to the aesthetic design of the building. Had these elements been designed using an alternative material, such as timber, the lightweight nature and economic efficiency would have been impossible to match.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project    

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Spondo Street   

 

New Brighton 

Port Elizabeth 

Eastern Cape 

Google Maps link https://maps.app.goo.gl/zHs49Zu4iwM8ZESX6  
Project Team RoleCompany
NominatorGlobal Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Client/ DeveloperDepartment of Roads and Public Works
ArchitectImbono FJA Architects
Structural Engineer MottMacdonald
Engineer  
Quantity SurveyorSVP Quantity Surveyors and Project Managers
Project ManagerSVP Quantity Surveyors and Project Managers
Main ContractorTranstruct
Steelwork Contractor (Facades and Balustrades)Rizel Engineering Services
Steelwork Contractor (Shading Louvres)Wild Dog Engineering
Steel Erector 
Cladding ManufacturerGlobal Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding SupplierGlobal Roofing Solutions – A division of Consolidated Steel Industries (Pty) Ltd
Cladding ContractorRV Smith PE

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  
Cladding profile/ type used GRS Zip-Tek 420 Cladding 
Cladding area coverage  360m2 
Cladding tonnage  

144 Oxford Street Rosebank

 

The steel structure for the 144 Oxford Street project acts as support for a composite roof slab, but more significantly supporting a glass curtain wall to a nine-story atrium.

The architectural brief for the project was to create an atrium space with minimal structural impact, and optimum visibility through the glass curtain wall, which encapsulates the entrance. Only slender structure, specifically box sections and rods, could be used to support the glass.

Why was steel used for this project?

Due to the extreme sensitivity of any deflections, large spans and large point loads as a result of the glass support structure, steel was the only viable choice from conception.

The glass curtain-wall that spans 25m wide by 9 stories high, and 4 meeting pods had no traditional support work due to the brief, and had to be hung from a hidden steel structure spanning over the atrium space. In both the case of the pods and the curtain wall support, high-tension rods were used to connect to the structure above. These rods fitted the aesthetic brief ,      could be produced in higher grades of steel, and due to the simple one-directional load acting upon them, the basic geometrical shape was fully utilized. The rods connected to the steel roof structure, which consisted of a 25m lattice girder spanning over the atrium onto concrete supports.

As the girder was supporting a long glass facade, minimal deflections were allowed for when under load. The deflection requirement along with the large compressive forces present in the girder was best satisfied with the use of large H-section members in the girder. The curtain wall plane was offset from the girder plane, which resulted in large horizontal tension forces. These forces were resisted by tying the girder vertical members via tension rods to the concrete cores. The tension rods allowed for simplified connections with high loads onto the cores due to the simple rod shape.

Overcoming challenges

From a fabrication point of view, and due to the large section sizes being used in the girder for the high loads it was to carry, the welding at the joints was a critical aspect of the fabrication where pre-heating of the parent material at the joints was necessary and 100% non-destructive testing to confirm suitable welds had been laid down.

Although there were numerous sections of steelwork to be installed on the site the installation of the Atrium girder presented the main challenge since it was not possible to gain access for a crane onto the site and the tower cranes could not lift the weight of the girder which was 12.2 tonnes.

A 500ton heavy lift crane with 105 ton of counterweight was therefore hired in to install the girder from Oxford Street at an installation radius of 52m.

The coordination for this lift was critical since one carriageway of Oxford Street needed to be closed off to traffic to allow the setup of the crane which was planed through from midnight on a Friday and for the balance of the weekend.

The road closure was installed at midnight on the Friday with the heavy-lift crane being set up and ready to lift the girder by 9:00AM on Saturday morning.

The whole operation went to plan and the crane was off the street by 5:00PM on the Saturday afternoon.

What makes this project impressive from a technical perspective?

An extremely large area of glass and structure is hanging from the long-span steel structure above. This required technical expertise to not only understand how the structure will move during loading, but how its performance would translate from design models into the actual fabricated and erected steel structure. Large efforts were made to calculate and refine the expected loading, to accommodate for the expected movement.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork in this project?

The girder had a camber that would absorb most of the movement, however just as maximum allowable deflection was a concern, so was over cambering. If at any time the girder did not perform and deflect as expected unwanted secondary issues would arise in the glass curtain wall and thus three adjustable deflection phases were built into the installation.

The first phase being in its unloaded state by means of packer plates to adjust the curtain wall supporting beam levels. The second with all permanent loads being applied to it, except the glass, and adjusting deflections by means of shortening the high tension rods with their threaded connections. And the last phase being with jacks used to lift the entire curtain wall into place.

How does this project demonstrate the benefits of Steel as a material?

Steel was the only material that could be manufactured and erected with a  tolerance of only a few millimetres, and also perform precisely as modelled. This was aided by the low number of manufacturing variables for steel, as opposed to other materials used in construction.

How did the project team work together?

The project team held several planning meetings, with the contractor included, occurred well before the fabrication of the steelwork even started. This helped the entire team to understand the challenges each member faced and how they would influence the team as a whole. The steel work was modelled and coordinated between consultants via 3d modelling in Revit. Since the steelwork in the Revit model was accurate, it was exported directly to the steel detailer for shop drawings.  Inspections of the fabricated steelwork occurred while the steel was still in the factory, due to the extreme time-sensitivity of the erection date.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 

Physical address of the project       

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

144 Oxford Street , Rosebank. 
Google Maps link   

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  August 2019 
Completion date of full project  November 2019 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  75 ton of various profiles + 990m2 of Bondek 

 

 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator TASS Engineering P/L
Client/ Developer Growthpoint
Architect Paragon Architects
Structural Engineer Sutherland Engineers
Engineer Sutherland Engineers
Quantity Surveyor RLB Pentad / Farrow Laing JV
Project Manager Origin Project Managers
Main Contractor WBHO / Tiber JV
Steelwork Contractor TASS Engineering P/L
Steel Erector Van Rensburg Steel
Cladding Manufacturer  –
Cladding Supplier  –
Cladding Contractor  – 
Corrosion Protection  –
Galvanising  –
Corrosion Protection  –
Paintwork Contractor DRAM Industrial Painters
Photographer, Photo competition Sutherland Engineers
Photographer, Other submitted images TASS Engineering P/L

 

 

 

 

 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Corruseal New Offices and Warehouse , Boksburg


Corruseal planned to build the new corrugated cardboard facility along similar lines to the facility it has in Cape Town. This Boksburg facility was planned to be a Phase 1 development with a view to adding to it at a later date.

This initial phase of the factory was built on a greenfield site and would cover an area of over 41 000m2 excluding the gatehouse. The factory required large minimally obstructed spaces to accommodate the production lines and to move materials. It was decided to have columns on a grid spacing of 25 x 13.5 metres throughout. The minimum clear height on the eaves of the production area was set at 9.0 metres. The clients brief included for 1.5 metre high roof monitors to incorporate translucent sheeting and smoke ventilation. Roof loading was required to support a future PV installation.

Why steel?

The project had a fast track construction program of some 6 months so the choice of a structural steel warehouse frame was the obvious choice. The detail of the roof configuration and type of columns was dictated by construction time pressures and practical constructability considerations.

A brief description of the structural framing

The main elements included 25 metre span trusses (or rafters) at 6.75 metre centres which were supported on girders spanning 13.5 metres. The internal footprint of the factory extended some 121 x 175 metres with no obstructing bracing in the production floor areas. All bracing was thus to be located in the perimeter walls. The lower portion of the perimeter walls were to have precast RC panels (varying between 1.5m and 2.1m high) with cladding above the precast walls to the eaves. Alternating translucent cladding strips were included   in the vertical walls to suit the architects’ requirements.

The design of the 25 meter spanning elements compared lattice trusses versus    cellular beam rafters. These elements also had to be fabricated with a 500 metre   “top chord” radius to suit the roof profile. The trusses designed with a 1.5m depth  (with continuity over the girder supports) proved to be a significantly more economical design. The trusses were designed with parallel chords and lacing. Sections selected were all various sizes of hot-rolled angles with gusset plates at  node connections. The 500m radiused chord was easily achieved in this form.

Cold formed lipped channel purlins at 1.562m centres were required to support the sprung effect of the curved roof cladding. The truss bottom chord was braced with hot rolled angle knee braces bolted to the purlins.

 The roof monitors stand 1.5 meters high x 6.75 metres wide (truss to truss). This sub-frame was constructed out of cold formed lipped channel sections (175 x 75 x 20 x 2.5) with knee bracing off the truss to control wind loading on the monitor.

The 13.5 metre spanning x 1.5 metre deep girders supporting every alternate truss were designed with hot-rolled channel sections on the top and bottom chords and hot rolled angles for the lacing. The selection of channel sections (with flat face horizontal) provided an efficient compression strut without requiring addition lateral bracing. The lacing was connected to the channels with welded gusset plates located on the channel centre line. The girders were designed to   be continuous over the supports thus providing further economy of section  weight.

Fabrication and erection

The main challenge on this project was the program.

In order to meet the required delivery dates the footprint of the roof structure was divided into a number of zones that matched the sequence that the structure was to be erected in and allowed for the envelope of the building to be closed in a phased manner. This ensured that all the steelwork in each zone was fabricated ready for delivery when required which allowed the installation to be completed and handed over for sheeting early in the program.

The erection process was also carefully looked at so as to pre-assemble as much of the steelwork onto the roof trusses at ground level before hoisting so as to minimise the installation of the smalls in the air which is always time consuming.

 This method of construction thus allowed the follow-on contractors access to the enclosed structure at an early stage in the construction and enabled the savings on the program to be maximised.

Cladding

The roof sheets were rolled directly onto the roof using a scaffold tower ramp and due to their length required the attendance of a large number of workmen to handle the sheets.

To control the effect of thermal expansion / contraction, the 175m roof cladding length was divided into thirds with the upstream sheet riding over the downstream sheet with a double purlin detail as advised by the cladding specialist sub-contractor.

The skylight roofs however have full length sheets 150m. long which was also decided by the cladding specialist sub-contractor.

How the project team worked together

This project was built with such speed and efficiency that it required a team of professionals, contractors and specialist subcontractors who had experience with similar projects. This experience is critical in order to plan and execute all the activities to merge towards the phased completion dates of the different component parts of the project. The 3D structural shop drawings were very professionally undertaken by an experienced and dedicated operator. This set the critical structural steel component of the project onto a winning footing. 

How this project demonstrates the benefits of steel

The building of a roof structure of this size in the time that was allowed could have only been done in steel and shows that steel is the material of choice when it comes to factory and warehouse roofs. A curved roof of this size is really impressive when viewed from the outside and  is a testament to what can be achieved with steelwork when suitable planning is employed.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project    

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

Cnr. Atlas & Commissioner Roads , Boksburg. 
Google Maps link   

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  September 2019 
Completion date of full project  December 2019 
Tonnage and steel profiles used  820 ton : Hot rolled columns , beams , angles , tubes , Cold rolled purlins & girts. 

Project Team Role Company
Nominator TASS Engineering P/L
Client/ Developer Corruseal Group
Architect ZAARC
Structural Engineer Kantey & Templer
Engineer Kantey & Templer
Quantity Surveyor Corruseal Group
Project Manager Corruseal Group
Main Contractor Abbeydale Construction
Steelwork Contractor TASS Engineering P/L
Steel Erector THLN Construction
Cladding Manufacturer SAFAL Steel
Cladding Supplier SAFINTRA South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Cladding Contractor Tate & Nicholson
Corrosion Protection  
Galvanising  
Corrosion Protection  
Paintwork Contractor DRAM Industrial Painters
Photographer, Photo competition Peter Hassall Photography

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CLADDING (If applicable) 
Completion date of cladding  October 2019 
Cladding profile/ type used  Roof : Saflok Zincal AZ150 / Sides : Widedek Colorplus AZ150 
Cladding area coverage   Roof : 42,000m2  ,  Sides : 10,000m2 

 

Nike Store Spiral Staircase, Rosebank

 

 

With Nike Rosebank we had to overcome some interesting challenges to connect the two store levels, which sit almost perpendicular to each other, with a single vertical integration system. Due to the positioning of the two levels, this meant that the staircase would be at the forefront of our trading space on the ground floor and a conventional staircase design would consume a very large portion of our trading floor area, these are both limiting factors when you consider that retail rental space in Rosebank comes at a high cost and every effort is made to maximize ROI.


Finding the right solution for this store put us on a very lengthy design process (almost 4 months), where we tested multiple staircase designs and configurations between the Nike Designers in Europe, our local Architectural Partners (TCRPv) and CADCON in South Africa.


The Nike Designers drew inspiration from European multi-level residential structures that have limited floor area to accommodate conventional staircase designs and as such make use of spiral staircases to connect the levels. These staircases are often quite minimalistic in design and don’t have to carry multiple occupants simultaneously unlike retail environments, so in order to beef up our design to carry the weight of simultaneous users, we had to develop a unit that was structurally sound without becoming overly weighted (from a visual sense) with heavy and multiple support posts, we wanted the consumer to be able to experience both levels of the store as they used the staircase and not feel as if they are navigating through a silo. We transitioned the timber floor finishes from the First Floor environment onto the staircase treads to give the unit a softness and to help us link the two gender split retail spaces.


These factors brought us to the design that you get to experience in the store, a structure that consists of mild steel plates running on two separate stringers, with its full weight (about 4 tons) being carried on only two foot plates. Over and above the staircase design, there was also major structural work done to the existing Basement and First Floor level slabs to give us the opening to see the ground floor as you descended the staircase and to give us the support to carry this staircase mass.
This spiral staircase is certainly a first for Nike across our global footprint of retail stores and I think can safely say that there is no other retail space in South Africa that uses this unconventional vertical integration method.
It was both challenging and eye-opening to see this structure being designed, manufactured, delivered and installed, while still constructing a retail space around it, definitely something I will always remember. – Europe


What is the purpose of the structure/ project?


The staircase was a critical architectural element in the Nike Store as this needed to be an element which would both physically and visually connect the two floors and in order for the store to maintain a sense of “connection” and “cohesiveness” despite the store being split over 2 levels. In terms of the stores overall design, the staircase had to make a statement; one which would create a sense of interest (spatially) but also be inviting to shoppers to explore whilst also strengthened the flow and movement through the store and irrespective of the change in floors. Careful thought and consideration was given to the ergonomics of the staircase to ensure that more than one person could travel between the levels simultaneously.


• What was the brief to the architect?

One of the biggest challenges with the Nike Rosebank store was to successfully connect the two store levels as there was limited opportunity, and area, where the floors could overlap. The existing slab construction and extent of existing services further limited the staircases positioning. Ultimately through careful co-ordination and team work, a possible position was identified at the front of the store, ideal for maximum visibility to shoppers, but now further restricted by the glazing line of the actual store, but which was ultimately overcome by the compact stair design which you see today.

• Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes, steel was always envisaged as the preferred material for the stairs.
We believe that the flexibility and durability of steel adds a dynamic element to a building project, allowing designers to think outside the box.

• Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used and why?

It was important to Nike that the structural design of the stair would not detract from the greater “sculptural element” that we needed to achieve. To achieve this, the following needed to happen;
• The balustrade and stringers needed to be made seamless.
• Due to the distance in height between the two floors, a landing was required to ensure a comfortable journey between floors. This concept although simple, complicated the structural design of the staircase.
• The risers needed to be designed as open to keep the structure visually as “light” as possible.
• Each tread needed to be bent from a single metal sheet so as to avoid unnecessary joints and junctions.
• The treads needed to be filled with concrete to stabilize and mitigate the vibrations whilst walking between floors walking. It is noticeable how solid the staircase feels when a person is walking on it.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project   

 

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

  

 

Oxford Street

The Zone

Rosebank 

GPS Co-ordinates    

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  20/11/2019 
 Completion date of full project  30/11/2019 
Tons of structural steel used  3 Tons 
Structural profiles used  Combination of Platework and Tubular 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PX5 Warehouse Conveyors Structures

 

 

The PX5 Warehouse and conveyor structures project entailed the construction of fertilizer storage and distribution building.

The building consists of concrete bases and retaining walls with a structural frame comprised of castellated sections.

Due to the very onerous nature of fertilizer on the corrosion protection, as well as the adverse effect of fertilizer to galvanizing, the team was forced to use a very onerous paint specification.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PROJECT OVERVIEW 
Physical address of the project     

Street Address  

Town  

Province 

South Coast Road, Rossburgh, Durban 
Google Maps link    

 

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK 
Completion date of steelwork  30/8/2019 
Completion date of full project  10/10/2019 
 Tons of structural steel used  2,500 Tons 
Structural profiles used  Combination of Rolled Profiles and Tubular 

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.