Camp Jao

The completely rebuilt and revamped Jao Camp will retain the same high stilted main area built into the tree canopy, with more private areas in amongst the trees. The camp will comprise two villas and five twins with private plunge pools, lounge and dining areas, kitchen facilities plus en-suite bathrooms, including indoor and outdoor showers. The new Jao Villas, accommodating four people each in the two identical guest rooms, which share the main area, will feature a private vehicle, guide, chef and butler.

Why Steel was chosen

 “Over the years traditionally camps have been built using local hardwood and tinkers. This was not good as the forestation is a real issue. Certified plantation tinkers treated were the next step in the evolution of the Bush camp….. However, The CCX treated tinkers request a lot of maintenance and stress on the roads, service people, low of income dining maintenance and general frustration.

For this reason, we have worked to use pre-manufactured steel structures by SE Steel. This gives us a maintenance free structure that is manufactured off-site and assembled on our pristine site.”

“Having to replace our old substructures provided us with the opportunity to enhance the special features that we always loved about Jao, to make improvements and incorporate extra touches. We are making the most of our camp environment, with buildings set to blend into the tree canopy whilst offering stunning views and honouring our commitment to be as eco-sensitive as possible”, says co-owner of the Jao Reserve, Cathy Kays.

Lead architects, Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens, who designed the original Jao in 1999, shared their approach to the rebuild: “We have taken a fresh and contemporary approach to the sense of adventure Jao always had – creating a feeling of not knowing what to expect around the next corner, and the element of surprise and delight in this ever evolving sculptural architectural language. The architecture is a collection of different spaces that take the visitor on a spatial adventure as one enjoys being in the Delta The everchanging architectural structures take their clues from forms found in nature but in a fresh innovative way. Conventional materiality is replaced with a more eco- sensitive palette as the bouquet of spaces and sculptures evolves.

The way one is couched, protected from the environment, is blended into a series of highly sculptural emotive spaces that amplify the blur between the concept of shelter & art/ sculpture & architecture.

The visitor’s poetic mental space is taken to a higher level. The choreography of 24 hours in the Delta has been crystallised into structures that artistically house and heighten each event and ritual experienced when visiting Jao. A family of concepts have been evolved by the architects specifically for the Jao concept”.

The main area will feature both indoor and outdoor lounges, dining areas, a satellite kitchen and several private dining areas, along with a fire deck. The spa at Jao will be tucked in amongst the palms for privacy and is surrounded by water to provide a calming and tranquil atmosphere. The gym will be built on the edge of the island, presenting stunning views over the lush waterways, while the main pool, with its unique canopy pavilion providing shade, will project out into the floodplain with 270-degree views of the Delta.

A colour palette of creams, greens, soft purple and splashes of yellow will be used, incorporating a unique botanical theme with special emphasis placed on the water lily. A range of beautiful new furnishings will be crafted to reflect the theme. A mix of wood and light-coloured Eva-tech decking will contrast with the red balau wooden walkways and lighter floors in the internal areas. The walkways reflect the old camp and provide a striking difference to the room interiors, which will be more refined in appearance. Comfort is provided through cooling and heating systems, complementing the camp design. Using Climate Wizard, an Australian cooling system, the suites and villas will be cooled with an indirect evaporative cooler that delivers a large amount of cold air with no added moisture, for a fraction of the energy used by conventional air conditioning systems. Self-igniting Calore stoves will provide heating during the colder months.

Design choices amplify the eco-sensitivity of the structure. The steep angling back wall and roof are made with fibre roofing material, with the interior clad in fibre reed and the exterior clad in fibre palm tiles. The rest of the walls are constructed from a combination of canvas and gauze, with minimal glass in front of the bed and bath. Using aluminum frames, large parts of the front of the room will open up. The main structures are all made out of steel that is painted a gum pole colour. The roofs will also feature gum poles and latte poles to support the fibre roofing on the inside, with wooden plyboard to which the reed is attached. For maximum eco-efficiency, built walls will feature Cavitybatt insulation and an added board of plywood, with waterproofing and fibre palm attached to the top layer. We have made great use of natural lighting – parts of the roof feature sky lights covered with latte poles to provide shaded, dappled lighting. All buildings will have a latte verandah roof to provide extra shade.

A key feature is the museum and gallery, described by Rech and Carstens as follows:

“Imagine a building that houses all our thoughts pertaining to visiting the Okavango Delta This is how the concept of the Gallery and Museum was borne. This creates a centre where visiting scientists and researchers can present their research, and where items can be displayed for educational purposes. There are also always a large number of found objects that are interesting from a guest perspective as they give a greater understanding of the area such as local plants and animal bones, as well as geographical maps and artworks of the region. We are building a double volume structure that has the Gallery on the upper level- where these items can be displayed to greater effect, rather than just render them décor items and the Shop on the lower level. Among the Gallery items will be a series of prints from the National herbarium in Pretoria of Botanical pressing made by Cathy Kays great grandfather- E.E Galpin- who was one of the pre-eminent botanists of his time and has been called the ‘Prince of Collectors”. He left 16000 sheets to the herbarium and a number of plant species have been named after him. We are selecting plants of the region that he identified. Other items on display will be a series of animal skeletons, mounted and displayed like a museum, for educational purpose. The current plan is for a giraffe skeleton. Obviously, these are skeletons of animals that have died from natural attrition, so they take some time to source.” From waterways and lagoons to dry Kalahari grasslands, Jao’s location on a remote island in one of the most picturesque concessions in the Delta provides both land and water Okavango experiences, with day and night game drives all year round.

“We are delighted with the progress of the rebuild to date, and look forward to welcoming our guests back to our new and enhanced Jao Camp in 2019”, Cathy concludes.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork March 2019
Completion date of full project June 2019
Tons of structural steel used 330 Tons
Structural profiles used Tubes and I-Beams all cold rolled
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Client/ Developer Ngamiland Adventure Safaris (Pty) Ltd
Architect silvioRECH + lesleyCARSTENS Architecture and Interior Architecture
Structural Engineer PLB Engineers
Engineer PLB Engineers
Quantity Surveyor Q24U
Project Manager SE Steel Fabrication SE Steel Fabrication SE Steel Fabrication

QS4U

Main Contractor Lodge Builders Botswana
Steelwork Contractor SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Steel Erector SE Steel Fabrication (PTY) Ltd
Cladding Manufacturer Fibre Roofing

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Durban Christian Centre – New Auditorium Campus

The “Jesus Dome” roof structure at the Durban Christian Centre was a well-known feature roof very visible on the sweep of the N2 coming into Durban. The auditorium burnt to the ground in a devastating fire in 2016 leaving the local congregation, some 3500 strong, without a place of worship. The rebuilt was commissioned in 2017 and the Team was gathered.

The Concepts

The Client wished to retain the memory of the original dome into the future, unfortunately, a shape which belies the modern understanding for acoustic performance. To produce a world-class auditorium the Architects, EPA, threw the memory of the dome up into the air and a tri-bifurcated arch was conceived. Simple, smooth extruded box shapes rising over a sheeted, duo-pitched and acoustically attenuated free-spanning roof structure. On plan confined onto a hexagonal concrete ring beam squeezed to focus on the stage.

There seemed little purpose, other than feature, for the arches if they were not to be used to hang the roof below. So two possible schemes were followed in parallel. One with no arches – the roof structure truss grillage made deep enough to free span, and a second with the arches used to hang the primary apex girder so economizing on the truss grillage. This gave cost comparisons to the Client in respect of the spend to achieve the arches over a more conventional structure.

Taking it to the Ground

Steel arches need pouncing points – for our structure, these were some 15m off the ground. Off shutter concrete prisms seemed to fulfill the need in every way. The primary arch buttresses needed to be slimmed to allow access on a restricted footprint so this arch was tied – the primary girder running under the primary arch forms the arch tie, interconnected in a bold move through large welded steel elbows set into the 2.5m wide reinforced concrete buttresses.

The secondary arch buttresses were free to sweep to ground along the steel arch thrust lines, or thereabouts.

For the balance of the roof structure, a chunky concrete ring beam sits atop 7m high concrete columns and tied into the double story structures at front and back of house.

Making the Geometry Work

The arches are, as a trio, wedged from a single sphere, with the origin deep below the floor slab. Each arch is the rind of a perfect slim slice through the origin of the sphere and as such, in radial section, is very slightly trapezoidal – this variation was so small that the shape could easily be rationalized to rectangular allowing the designers and fabricators to select UC sections radiussed about the major axis. The Hulabond cladding box adopted the final trapezoidal form. Round tubes were used for the lacing in combination with web plates.

With the concept realized and agreed with the Architect, the structural design team got to work developing a parametric algorithm in the visual programming environment of Dynamo, which works seamlessly with Revit. This was then used to solve the geometry of all of the arches by iterating through the parameters of the sphere, and the arch truss centerlines imported into the global OASYS analyses and REVIT models and ultimately into TEKLA.

Getting the Design Done

The internal truss grillage is a simple 6×6 grid, allowing the designers some latitude to offer up future-proofing for spot loads at the intersections, as well as providing a sensible patchwork for the arrangement of acoustic lining, services reticulation and suspended acoustic blades above the 3500 seated auditorium array.

Simple IPE purlins set up a bottom flange shelf frame for the acoustic lining and a platform for the Klip-Tite sheeting system. A clamped bracket was devised for all the in-roof services so that post erection drilling or screwing could be prohibited globally.

A series of global analysis models were set up, augmented by a suite of simpler two-dimensional model checks. The primary software used was the OASYS GSA Building Suite program allowing the import and export of geometry into and out of both Revit and Tekla.

Global buckling considerations paid attention to the arch arrangement, and overall stability, as well as serviceability for pre-cambers, and interim construction step models incorporating temporary support towers to protect the geometry during erection.

All the arches end with exactly the same “cheese wedge”, terminating on articulating pot bearings designed to resist pull-off (when the wind blows).

Getting to the Fabrication

Negotiating with a chosen fabricator, Impact Engineering was hotly debated at the outset. For such an iconic structure it is our view that this was a primary factor in the success of the project. Agreeing on fabrication methodology and understanding fabrication economies with the fabricators during the design development is a process most designers would wish for. We applaud our Clients and fellow Professionals for engaging in this way.

NJV decided from the outset to partner with a selected detailing house, Strutech 3D Modelling. The final negotiation TEKLA model became the fabrication model in a fluid process which eliminated in our estimate 4 to 6 weeks of critical path time.

Impact Engineering fabricated the arches as a whole, one in each of their fabrication sheds. Once complete they were carved up for blasting and painting. The arch crossover units were then preassembled for fit in the sheds before transport to site.

Innovating for Erection

Steffanuti Stocks have been exemplary in their attention to setting out of the large HD bolt sets ( note from Author: in 30 years of practicing as a structural engineer both here and abroad the use of survey and delivery of accuracy by both Steffanuti Stock and Impact Engineering was at a level of excellence I have not witnessed before).

Program necessitated that the arch pieces be pre-clad with the Hulabond panels almost entirely prior to lifting, this required coordination and care between Façade Solutions and Impact with only a small window of time after the fact to access the arches utilizing cherry pickers for snags and joint sealing.

An erection plan well considered reduced the temporary tower suite to two, one under each hanger intersection. To say that site access was tight would be an under-exaggeration, and every truss piece lift brought the site action to a halt and a gathering audience. Each piece was maneuvered into position, lifted and slipped into place – no double lifting, no cladding damaged and no site work required. After each lift pre-set survey points were checked and structural behavior deflections matched with expectations of the analytical OASYS models.

The eight tubular hangers lay green at the fabrication works until the primary girder was de-propped and then each was site measured and purpose made to fit. Once the arches were de-propped and the roof was hanging the trusses could be completed below the arch formation and the cladding installed.

The arches will be accessed for cleaning by rope access cleat methods devised under consultation, the cleats having been installed prior to the arch cladding.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork March 2019
Completion date of full project October 2019
Tons of structural steel used 280
Structural profiles used Hot rolled sections, nominal tubular
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding March 2019
Cladding profile/ type used Klip-Tite 700 0,53mm CIS
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 3300m2
Nominator NJV Consulting (Pty)Ltd
Client/ Developer Durban Christian Centre
Architect Elphick Proome Architects Incorporated
Structural Engineer NJV Consulting (Pty)Ltd
Quantity Surveyor Abakali
Quantity Surveyor (Lead) RLB Pentad Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager M3 Africa Consulting
Main Contractor Steffanuti Stocks Building KZN
Steelwork Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty)Ltd
Steel Erector CMGC Projects
Cladding Manufacturer Global Roofing Solutions
Cladding Contractor Impact Engineering (Pty)Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Phoenix Galvanising
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Top Coat
Fabrication detailing Strutech 3D Modelling
Corrosion Consultant          T.H.C.P.S.
Bearing Supplier Nova Engineering Works (Pty)Ltd
Access Consultant Façade Solutions
Arch Cladding Sub Contractor Scope Of Work

Christian Revival Church

Christian Revival Church (CRC) on Witkoppen road in Douglasdale Johannesburg features structural steel in the main auditorium roof, the spiral ramp and the feature ring structure supporting the main staircase.


The structural framing

The lower and upper gallery seating accommodates 4500 congregants and is enclosed with a curved structural steel roof consisting of triangular radiused roof trusses spaced 10m apart over an area of 80m x 68m. The seven unique structural steel triangular space frame trusses (also referred to as ‘Toblerone trusses’) are manufactured from circular hollow sections with varying spans up to 50 m. These radiused trusses support the purlins, roof sheeting, insulation, air-conditioning ducts, a service walkway, and audio-visual systems.

The auditorium roof structure was analysed using the Prokon frame analysis program with loading modelled in 20 different load combinations. The Toblerone trusses which span across the entire main auditorium building, are supported by reinforced concrete columns with corbels at each end of the trusses as well as by an intermediate reinforced concrete ring beam. The trusses are constructed from a variety of circular hollow sections with two top chords and one bottom chord connected with diagonal members along the span. The top chords, which under most load combinations are in compression, are braced together with horizontal circular members. The trusses are roughly 1.9 m deep and 2.4 m wide in plan and are curved to provide a curved roof profile and suitable slope for rainwater disposal. 

Each of the seven space trusses is unique as these have intermediate support from a ring beam which is curved in plan and which forms the rear perimeter of the auditorium. The intermediate support point of each of the trusses consequently occurs at a different point along its length resulting in changes to the arrangement of each truss.

The size of the steel trusses makes thermal expansion and contraction a significant consideration which was dealt with by providing movement joints and flexible connections thereby allowing the trusses to move freely when expansion and contraction occurs. These movement joints, which consist of steel plates with PTFE sheets between, have been provided at the steel to concrete connections on the corbels for each bottom chord and at the ring beams above for the top chords on each end of each truss.

Due to the length of the steel trusses, each truss was constructed into 3 or 4 units to facilitate transport to site. Each unit was welded together in the workshop and provided with connection plates at each of its ends so that these could be bolted together during erection on site. The steel connections consisted of steel end plates and stiffener plates welded to the ends of the two top chords, one bottom chord and two diagonal chords. The plates were provided with bolt holes of varying number and diameter bolts determined by the maximum load being transmitted through each connection.

The spiral ramp is a significant architectural and structural feature in the entrance hall of the church. The ramp starts in the lower parking basement and provides safe and comfortable vertical access to all floors for all users including those in wheelchairs.

One central reinforced concrete column in the center of the spiral ramp supports a circular reinforced concrete beam and slab system at the roof of the spiral ramp. This slab and beam system is braced by perimeter columns and beams which also support the glass facade. 55mm Diameter steel hangars with adjustable couplers are hung from the slab and beam system and support the inner steel stringer channels. The outer steel stringer channels are connected to the inner stringers with I-beams and are braced at various points to the columns surrounding the ramp. A reinforced concrete slab forms the floor of the ramp and is supported between the two stringers and intermediate I-beams for the length of the spiral ramp.

 

The steel ring structure was added to overcome an aesthetic challenge encountered during the initial design of the concrete staircase. In order to achieve the required aesthetic outcome, the design of the staircase was modified by removing the reinforced concrete columns which initially extended from the first landing to the second landing and replacing these with a circular hollow section steel ring structure.

The steel ring structure is supported at its base on either side of a reinforced concrete column beneath the landing of the first flight. This is the base of the circular structure and from here it circumvents the first flight’s staircase landing and meets the base of the second staircase at the apex of the circle. The steel structure is fixed to the base of the second flight staircase landing where it provides support to the staircase. The steel structure is connected at either side of the landing of the first flight for stability.

The steel ring solved an aesthetic challenge and provides a unique structural and architectural feature in the building and introduces a fun element on the side where the children’s church is located.

From the Project Manager’s  Perspective

Main Roof.

The first issue we had from an erection point of view was that the tower crane was in the wrong position and hence caused issues when erecting the final 3 bays.

  • Transporting of the sections to site was also a logistical challenge to the amount of trips required.
  • The setting out and drilling of the M30 anchors on the concrete ring was also a challenge which was overcome by the use of templates and coring the holes.
  • Working out and erecting a support scaffold for the 3rd and 4th truss bay was a challenge and we overcame that by allowing for scaffold jacks and timber batons on the top of the scaffold so we could fine tune the support structure.
  • The installation of the last section of each truss was difficult due to the tight 50mm (design) tolerance from the back of the truss to the RC upstand this was often down to 15mm.
  • Doing tandem lifts on the last 3 trusses with a tower crane and a mobile crane and having to walking though the truss that was partially suspended to connect the splice connection. This often took a few hours as the trusses where picked up with a 4 sling rigging system and caused deflection of the truss sections when suspended. The use of mechanical lifting and pulling equipment assisted greatly in ensuring every splice had no gaps.

Spiral Ramp

Setting out of the levels of the eyelets on the hanging rods was a challenge due to access and when installing a section below a section that as set we found that rotation was happening and changing the levels.

  • Installation of the spiral stringer sections was difficult due to access and don’t being able to use a mobile crane for the first ring due to head clearance from the soffit above.

We overcame this by having cast in sleeves positioned in the slab above to allow for lever hoists to do the lifting and manipulating of the ramp sections.

  • The access scaffolding had to be adjusted and lowered for every section to be installed.
  • Once all sections where installed we noticed significant creep was happening on the ramp which in turn caused the handing robs to be out of plumb. This was overcome by shortening and lengthening the ramp sections and cutting off and rewelding the fin plates that connected the ramp sections to the eyelets on the hangers.
  • Finishings to create an aesthetically pleasing structure took a significant amount of finesse with the grinder and body putty work.

Construction Director’s Perspective

The CRC Church developments roof structure looks simple at first glance until one realises that it is made up of curved triangular “Toblerone” main support structures with varying spans brought about by an intermediate, curved in plan, concrete support beam which heads the back wall of the main auditorium.

The seven number Toblerone trusses span an opening of 68 meters and are made from circular tubular sections of varying diameters and wall thicknesses to match the varying spans and in order to make them all to the same curved shape they were fabricated incrementally in a layout jig approximately 30m in length in the workshop.

These trusses were further complicated by walkways which are in the lower ‘V’ of the truss mounted on welded on brackets on the bottom chord at approximately 920mm.

The Toblerone trusses were fabricated in transportable lengths taking into account their shape and curvature which are bolted together using stiffened pipe flanges of varying thicknesses.

Erection of the trusses was fairly straightforward using the site tower crane and mobile cranes where the tower crane was unable to reach with the only real problem being the close tolerance between the perimeter ring beams which required some interesting manoeuvring of the suspended sections to coax them onto their holding down bolts.

A second more interesting structure from a constructability point of view is the spiral ramp at the car park entrance to the church. This ramp starts at basement level and services three levels through the structure.

The spiral structure is suspended from the concrete roof by suspension bars on its inner stringer with the outer stringer bolted to perimeter concrete and steel columns in unsymmetrical locations.

The ramp structure was fabricated in a specially designed jig framework in our workshops which allowed for the various unsymmetrical support locations to be accommodated.

Due to the inner stringer of the ramp being supported on suspension bars the structure had to be erected from the top down which presented some really difficult challenges in terms of headroom to get the top sections in and the entire structure wanting to rotate as more sections and weight were added.

Cast in sleeves in the roof slab with tirfor cables passing through were utilised to install the initial sections and the entire structure had to be installed first and then aligned from top to bottom to get the rotation out such that all the suspension bars were vertical in the final setup.

A third interesting feature on the Project is the “Feature Ring” supporting the mid landing of the concrete access stair at the one end of the entrance lobby. Although not particularly challenging from a fabrication and installation point of view it does provide a unique structural solution for supporting the stairways second landing which is aesthetically pleasing and provides an interesting talking point for the congregants.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork November 2018
Completion date of full project February 2019
 Tons of structural steel used 200 tons
Structural profiles used Hollow sections, hot rolled sections, CFLC
 SA content – if this is an export project 100% SA Content
CLADDING
Cladding profile/ type used 0.53mm ISQ550 Novotexi 440 profile sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 8520 m² (47 tons)
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Tass Engineering
Client/ Developer Christian Revival Church 
Architect DBM Architects JHB (Pty)Ltd.
Structural Engineer Fortem Consulting Engineers (Pty)Ltd.
Civil Engineer Tekciv Consulting Engineers 

 

Quantity Surveyor Mellet Quantity Surveyors
Project Manager Deo Gloria Developments (Pty) Ltd
Electrical Engineer NALA Consulting Engineers(Pty)Ltd
Mechanical Engineer PV3 Engineers
Main Contractor Mike Buyskes Construction (Pty)Ltd

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Fezile Dabi Stadium, Parys

The roof structure provides protection from the elements to the main grandstand and adjoining stands.  The stadium was officially opened in 2013 but without a roof. As part of the upgrade of the stadium, a new roof was proposed.


What was the brief to the architect?

Provide a roof on the existing stands that is both practical as well as aesthetically pleasing on the eye.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes proposed as steel from the beginning

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The roof trusses and supporting columns are made entirely from Circular Hollow Sections (CHS)

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

The bull-nose on the stadium roofs were a concern. A mock-up was carried out at the steelwork fabricator’s premises and approval was given to continue as planned

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The fabrication process required several fabrication jigs to be made up to accommodate the 84-no trusses required for the project. The tubular sections were rolled into various radii and the cross bracing were individually profiled cut to allow a stub-on connection to the main truss struts. The challenges faced during erection involved fitting a new roof onto an existing structure. Interface connections that were not in the envisaged locations, resulted in modifications having to be carried out on new steelwork.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding
in this project?

The project is aesthetically appealing in that a previous stadium is now provided with a roof which enables the spectators to have some protection from the elements.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

Constant communication between the Steelwork Contractor and the Structural Engineer was critical to get agreement on being able to fit the new roof to the existing stadium stands.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork March 2019
Completion date of full project April 2019
Tons of structural steel used Approx. 300 tons
Structural profiles used Tubular Steelwork up to 220mm diameter in roof
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding March 2019
Cladding profile/ type used 0,58mm IBR Chromadek Sheeting
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 7920 m2
Nominator CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Aecom
Quantity Surveyor WBHO
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Steel Detailer MONDO CANE
Cladding Supplier Clotan Steel
Cladding Contractor CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Dram Industrial Coatings

Fourways Mall – Promotions Court

The roof structure provides protection from the elements.  As part of the upgrade of the Fourways Mall, a new roof was proposed. The fabrication process required several fabrication jigs to be made up to accommodate the roof design for the project. The roof was built on ground level and erected on temporary roof support steelwork. tubular sections were rolled into various radii and the cross bracing was individually profiled cut to allow a stub-on connection to the main truss struts. The challenges faced during erection involved fitting a new roof onto the temporary structure and accuracy of fabrication & erection was of the essence.

What was the brief to the architect?

Provide a roof on the new Mall extension that is both practical as well as aesthetically pleasing on the eye.

Was the project envisaged in steel from the start? If not – why was it built in steel in the end?

Yes proposed as steel from the beginning

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The roof trusses are made entirely from Circular Hollow Sections (CHS), Cruciform Columns supporting the roof was made out of plate

Give a brief description of the cladding process (complexity, difficulty, innovation etc)

Cladding to the roof was done by TDS, the roof was covered with Shutter board, Spider-P waterproofing & Synthetic TPO membrane

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding
in this project?

The project is aesthetically appealing in the shape of this roof design.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

Constant communication between the Steelwork Contractor and the Structural Engineer was critical to get agreement on being able to fit the new roof.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork 28-02-2019
Completion date of full project TBA
Tons of structural steel used 160t
Structural profiles used Tubes, UB, UC & CFLC
SA content – if this is an export project 100% local procured
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Azrapart (Pty) Ltd
Architect Boogertman + Partners
Structural Engineer WSP Africa
Engineer WSP Africa
Quantity Surveyor Quanticost QS
Project Manager SIP Project Managers
Main Contractor Mota-Engil Construction South Africa
Steelwork Contractor CADCON (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector Ijaca
Cladding Contractor Hulabond Cladding
Skylight Rainbow Skylight S.A. (Pty) Ltd
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
TDS Contractors

 

Naspers Skybridge

The Naspers Skybridge is a pedestrian link between the CTICC 2 building and the Naspers building. The client tasked the architect with designing a new bridge between the new CTICC 2 building and the NASPERS building. This would aid in daily access for Media24 staff, as they did not have enough parking of their own and could then utilize some of the parking bays in the CTICC buildings. This new bridge had to link CTICC 2’s Second Floor with NASPER’s Fourth floor, roughly 13.5m above the road level.

The architects developed various concepts for the design of the bridge. Inspiration was taken from the shape of a tree, interpreted in different architectural expressions. Through workshops with the client (both CTICC and NASPERS) and the professional team, multiply small-scale physical models were built to convey the different design ideas, including an option of steel laser cut panels that form a sculptural support and leaf-pattern balustrade, and another version with steel support “branches”. Ultimately, the design was refined to form a simple yet “raw” aesthetic, with the architectural and structural logic informing the details. A composite wood decking floor in a staggered pattern was used to enhance the “raw” aesthetic, with Rheinzink roof sheeting chosen for aesthetic and practical reasons due to the slanted and curved roof. Panoramic views of the city can be experienced through the full-height glass façades.

Due to the location of the entrances to the buildings, the bridge curves for about half of its length. This creates an interesting architectural experience as one crosses the bridge, while making it possible to see the bridge’s exterior from the inside. Structurally the challenge was to support the curved section only on two columns, with the end part at the CTICC not being able to be supported by the existing building (thus creating a large cantilever that had to have minimal movement at the façade entry point).

The bridge was always envisaged as being constructed out of steelwork – to allow maximum views to the sides and to enable construction with minimal disruption to the street below. The bridge structure comprised mainly Universal Beam and Column sections, with some angles added to support the flooring and a CHS safety rail for window cleaning.

Engineer Interview

Challenges arose due to the weight of sections, which made moving these sections a challenge during both fabrication and erection. The bridge sections were assembled into just two pieces adjacent to the road, allowing these two large pieces to be erected using a 440t crane during a road closure on a Sunday. The two parts had never been spliced together before erection, with all dimensions being theoretical. The first real fit was therefore on site, and everything fitted perfectly.

Another challenge was erecting the bridge on a windy and rainy day, forcing the contractor to wait for a lull before lifting.

Since the bridge was modelled in 3D, an IFC export was provided to the contractor to aid them in the shop drawing process. In turn, they provided their fabrication model in 3D for approval by the engineer and architect, which ensured that the aesthetic intentions of the professional team could be met.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork October 2018
Completion date of full project March 2019
Tons of structural steel used  
Structural profiles used UB, UC and CHS sections
CLADDING
Completion date of cladding No cladding
Cladding profile/ type used Rheinzink
Cladding area/ coverage and tonnage 165m2
PROJECT TEAM COMPANY
Nominator Anchor Steel Projects
Client/ Developer Cape Town International Convention Centre
Architect Osmond Lange Architects + Planners
Structural Engineer Sutherland
Quantity Surveyor Turner & Townsend
Project Manager Lukhozi Engineers
Main Contractor Superway Construction
Steelwork Contractor Anchor Steel Projects
Steel Erector Anchor Steel Projects
Cladding Supplier Two Oceans Metal
Cladding Contractor Naturally Slate

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

CTICC Skybridge

The CTICC Skybridge was intended as an above-ground link between CTICC 1 on the West of Heerengracht Street and CTICC 2 on the East. The client asked the Architects to design an enclosed pedestrian skybridge to connect the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC 1) with the CTICC East Expansion (CTICC 2) across the busy Heerengracht Street. Development of the CTICC skybridge was considered critical in enabling the two buildings to function as a single integrated international events hosting venue and providing a seamless visitor’s experience.


The curved skybridge with its slender slanted steel columns has an unusually dynamic aesthetic from outside. The curved route inside provides a dynamic visual experience as one moves across the bridge in anticipation of an obscured end destination. The indirect travelling direction guides the visitor’s gaze outwards and across the historic Heerengracht Street and allows the bridge to become a unique destination in its own right. This purposefully iconic structure pays tribute to CTICC’s core purpose of ‘connecting people’.

The bridge was always envisaged as being constructed out of steelwork – to allow maximum views to the sides and to enable construction with minimal disruption to the street below. Universal Beam and Column sections were chosen to frame the concrete floor and roof, which were both cast in sections in between these steel members, with support provided by Bondek sheeting. Universal Column sections were also chosen for the Vertical members, in order to frame the glass panels.

Circular hollow sections, however, were chosen for the diagonal members to minimise the disruption of the view. The same members were also used for horizontal bracing at the roof and floor level, to keep the section sizes down. Large circular hollow sections were also used for the slanting support columns.

Engineer interview:

Challenges arose due to the weight of sections, which made moving these sections a challenge during both fabrication and erection. The bridge sections were assembled into

just two pieces adjacent to the road, allowing these two large pieces to be erected using a 440t crane during a road closure on a Sunday. The two parts had never been spliced together before erection, with all dimensions being theoretical. The first real fit was therefore on site, and everything fitted perfectly.

Another challenge was the temporary support of the bridge during erection. This was overcome by introducing the temporary towers, which made the installation much simpler and safer.

Since the bridge was modelled in 3D, an IFC export was provided to the contractor to aid them in the shop drawing process. In turn, they provided their fabrication model in 3D for approval by the engineer and architect, which ensured that the aesthetic intentions of the professional team could be met.

Project motivation editorials are provided by the project nominator. If any technical details, company names or product names are incorrect, please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK
Completion date of steelwork September 2018
Completion date of full project November 2018
Structural profiles used UB, UC and CHS sections
PROJECT TEAM ROLE COMPANY
Nominator Anchor Steel Projects
Client/ Developer Cape Town International Convention Centre
Architect Convention Architects – a JV between Makeka Design Lab cc, SVA International (Pty) Ltd and van der Merwe Miszewski Architects (Pty) Ltd
Structural Engineer Sutherland
Quantity Surveyor Turner & Townsend
Project Manager Lukhozi Engineers
Main Contractor Superway Construction
Steelwork Contractor Anchor Steel Projects
Steel Erector Anchor Steel Projects

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Makro Riversands

What is the purpose of the structure/ project?

The structure serves as a retail centre.

What was the brief to the architect?

To maximize space utilization and minimize construction time.

Give a brief description of the structural framing. What type of sections were used (e.g. hollow, cellular, I beams etc) and why?

The main roof structure consists of girders and castellated rafters. Castellated beams were used for aesthetics and to reduce the overall weight of the sections along the span. Also to increase the spanning capabilities.CHS were used in the barrel vaults as an architectural feature.

Were there any challenges in the fabrication of the project from the engineer’s design – if yes, please tell? Tell more about fabrication and erection process if it was complex, difficult, innovative etc.

The fabrication of the barrel vault needed to be completed to a tight tolerance in order to ensure correct fitment of barrel vault sky –lights.

It was complex due to the fast-track nature of the project. Whereby close coordination was required between the civil contractor, steel contractor, building contractor, sheeting contractor, fire services, mechanical services in order for the works to be completed in the required sequence within the building footprint.

What is special/ unusual/ innovative/ aesthetic about the steelwork/cladding in this project?

The structural steel barrel vault arches on Makro structures have become a nationwide symbol of the Makro brand.

How did the project team work together (e.g contractor involved early, challenges/ ease of communication etc.)

MPW detailing office worked in close communication with the engineering and architecture team in order to ensure discrepancies were picked up within the detailing phase, to allow for adjustments to be made prior to fabrication. This resulted in a structural system which very closely resembled a Mecano set. Therefore it allowed us to reduce erection time on site. All contractors on site worked in close unison moving from section to section ensuring all the requirements were met timeously.

Tons of structural steel used 480 TONS
Structural profiles used CASTELLATED, TUBING, UC, UB

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator MPW Steel Construction
Client/ Developer Makro / Century Properties
Architect R&L Architects
Structural Engineer L&S Consulting
Engineer Not provided by nominator
Quantity Surveyor Not provided by nominator
Project Manager MPW Steel Construction
Main Contractor Concor
Steelwork Contractor MPW Steel Construction
Steel Erector MPW Steel Construction
Cladding Manufacturer Grs
Cladding Supplier Grs
Cladding Contractor Roofing Guarantee 
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Not provided by nominator
Photographer, Photo competition MPW Steel Construction
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

Time Square Maslow Hotel

 

Tons of structural steel used 700 tons
Structural profiles used Structural Hot Rolled, Tubular Steelwork up to 1000mm diameter, etc.

Project team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Cadcon (Pty) Ltd
Client/ Developer Sun International
Architect LYT Architects
Structural Engineer WSP
Engineer WSP
Quantity Surveyor MLC
Project Manager Not provided by nominator
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon (Pty) Ltd
Steel Erector On Par
Cladding Manufacturer Not provided by nominator
Cladding Supplier Not provided by nominator
Cladding Contractor Chartwell Roofing
Corrosion Protection
Galvanising
Not provided by nominator
Corrosion Protection
Paintwork Contractor
Dram Industrial Coatings
Photographer, Photo competition Sun International
Photographer, Other submitted images Not provided by nominator

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.

PwC Tower – Triple Height Lobby

PwC Tower is PwC’s new head office in Johannesburg. The floor plates of the 28-storey building rotate by 1.2 degrees per floor, which results in a doubly-curved surface for the building’s façade and the structural line behind. The reception is housed in a triple volume lobby area at ground floor. This triple volume space flows into the adjacent meeting centre, and is used as a café and informal meeting space.

A steel and glass atrium roof covers the link between the tower and the meeting centre, whilst a steel link bridge with glazed balustrades connects the two floors at first floor level with a steel feature stair forming the principal link up to the second floor of the meeting centre. Whilst the majority of the tower floors are post-tensioned concrete, the first and second floors of the tower are formed in steelwork with bondek slabs and are hung from the third floor, to increase the column-free space in the lobby below. The northern part of the lobby features a triple volume steel and glass façade, gently following the twist of the tower. Within the atrium and outside the glass façade the sloping and spiralling columns of the building are encased in steel tubes to act compositely with the concrete inside; this increases the capacity of the reinforced concrete columns where they are unrestrained over the three floors and means that the overall section sizes can be similar to the rest of the tower which allows us to achieve the preferred architectural aesthetic. All of these components feature the use of steelwork in a complex geometric form and in the majority of cases the painted steel is exposed to form the finished surface.

Rectangular hollow sections were used on the skylight. The suspended floors were built out of BOND-DEK on cellular beams, with curved edge beams rolled horizontally. The hangers are circular hollow profiles. The bridge and stair are predominantly formed from welded plate with concealed connections and preformed slots for the cantilevered glazed balustrades. The façade mullions, spanning over three floors are I-sections, and are laterally restrained by circular hollow profiles. Rolled square hollow profiles are used over the main entrance doors. The structural columns in the tower are encased in large diameter circular hollow tubes.

The geometry of all this steelwork was generated by parametric scripts. The steel profiles were explicitly modelled in 3D by the design team. Conventional plans with all setting out information were produced for use on site but the 3D steelwork model was also issued to the contractor to use as the basis of their steel shop model and then later used to check the steel shop model.

Tons of structural steel used 250t
Structural profiles used RHS, CHS, UB, UC and plates

Project Team

Project Team Role Company
Nominator Arup
Client Attacq
Developer Atterbury
Architect LYT Architecture
Structural Engineer Arup
Quantity Surveyor Brian Heineberg & Associates
Main Contractor WBHO
Steelwork Contractor Cadcon
Steel Erector Cadcon
Cladding Manufacturer Geustyn & Horak (G&H Aluminium)
Cladding Supplier Geustyn & Horak (G&H Aluminium)
Cladding Contractor Geustyn & Horak (G&H Aluminium)

If you were a part of this project, and your company details are incorrect or missing – please notify the SAISC so that the error can be corrected.